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Full text of "S.F. News Letter (July-Dec. 1898)"

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Vol.LVIf 



SAN FRANCISCO, JULY 2, 1898. 



Numher 1. 



Printed and published retry Saturday by the proprietor. FRED MARRIOTT 
V% Kearny street. San Francisco. Entered at San Francisco Post- 
office at Second-class Matter. 

The office of the NEWS LETTER in New York City is at Temple Court; 
and at Chicago. 90S Roycs Building (Frank E. Morrison, Eastern 
Representatirej where information may be obtained regarding subscrip- 
tion and advertising rates. 

GENERAL H. G. Otis is wisely establishing a rigid 
guard line about the regimental camp, and barring 
therefrom questionable characters day or night. This 
should have been done long ago. The civil and the mili- 
tary have been far too intimate. 

OAKLAND has a "divine dealer," who is making cures 
among the simple-minded folk of that place. Religious 
frenzy characterizes his meetings, and men and women fall 
upon each other's necks in all the abandon of temporary 
erotic idiocy, and bear tumultuous testimony to the power 
of this first-class fraud. There is no one in Oakland who 
requires healing so much as this charlatan, or whose cure 
could be more quickly effected. A coat of tar and feathers, 
and an order to vamoose, would be the only prescription, 
applied by the ungentle laying on of stalwart hands. 



LATE conversion evidently has its beneficent uses, es- 
pecially when its saving impulses are embraced by a 
member of the San Francisco Board of Education. Direc- 
tor Gallagher has experienced a change of heart, and now 
loudly proclaims that reckless extravagance in the Board 
and the loose, not to say downright dishonest, way of 
making repairs and letting contracts must end. As 
chairman of the Finance Committee, Gallagher is a heavy 
weight on matters of dollars and cents, and his opinions 
are entitled to consideration. His heroic determination 
to save the wreck and patch up the hopeless, disfigured 
reputation of the Board, affords a spectacle of courage in 
the face of insuperable obstacles that is almost touching. 

ALL the bombastic talk and bluster of the Spanish 
press and far more unreliable American newspapers, 
to the effect that Camara's fleet is headed for Manila, may 
be accepted as bosh. Nothing short of suicide could coun- 
cil such a course. If the Spanish fleet were at Manila to- 
day it would be annihilated by Dewey. That Camara 
would travel six thousand miles solely for the purpose of 
being sent to the bottom of the sea, is not to be contem- 
plated. The only possible reason for such a naval demon- 
stration would be found in a secret understanding with 
Germany, which must be promptly rejected if we are to 
credit the "Mailed Hand" with common intelligence. 

TWO weeks ago the attention of the Union-street Rail- 
way Company was called to the fact that the entire 
neighborhood wherein is located its power-house, was suf- 
fering from soot and smoke that pours from its chimney, 
and request made that the nuisance be abated. Nothing 
has been done, and hundreds of homes are deluged with 
showers of smut that issue from the smoke-stack at all 
hours of the day. A petition demanding the abating of 
this annoyance, signed by a number of the sufferers, will 
result in legal steps for its suppression. The people are, 
averse to such extreme measures, but if they cann&ti ob- . 
tain relief by other means they will be compelled to direct I 
the attention of the authorities to that incormajble'ckjm- 
ney. As there is real cause for complaint, ancKMJe c Q&f(, 
pany can correct the nuisance, it should do 
further delay. 



^WjgiSut 



DURING his term of office Mayor Phelan has done 
many graceful acts, but he has done nothing that 
should be more generally appreciated than his recent gift 
of a library building and ball, together with an admirably 
selected library, to the city's poor. The practical value 
of this benevolence and the kindly sympathy for the friend- 
less and distressed will keep the Mayor's memory green 
among the unfortunate and afflicted as long as the gift re- 
mains and distress can pulsate with gratitude. 



OF the many instances of flagrant disregard of business 
interests of the city and absorption of the tax-payers' 
coin, the manipulation of the new City Hall on Kearny 
street by contractors with a pull, is the most indefensible 
and disgraceful. Bateman Bros, appear to run things 
exactly as they choose. They make any promise de- 
manded, but utterly fail to keep their word. Business 
along Kearny street has been injured, the public incon- 
venienced, and contracts violated through their inexcus- 
able neglect. Protests by property owners and mer- 
chants create only a temporary interest in the Board of 
Supervisors. The contractors come to the front with any 
excuse at hand, and the extension they ask for is granted 
without reluctance or delay. The Supervisors should have 
long ago availed themselves of the provisions of ordinances 
that permit the city to drive off the derelict contractors 
and finish the work at their expense. 



SAN FRANCISCO will have on the Fourth of July an 
immense number of guests. The parade will undoubt- 
edly be the most imposing ever witnessed in this city, and 
thousands of people from the country will visit us on 
that day. It will be impossible for the police force to con- 
trol the throng that will congregate along the line of 
march. The crowd, unless restrained in some other way, 
will overrun everything, swarm the streets, and interfere 
seriously with the procession. We suggest that the com- 
mittee having charge of this part of the exercises shall 
string wires along the streets through which the proces- 
sion passes, confining the crowds to the sidewalks. With 
such a cordon drawn from one end of the blocks to the 
other all confusion would be avoided. The streets would 
be kept clear, and the entire view of the procession unob- 
structed. There is ample time to do this. It is a custom 
that prevails in the East, and there is no reason why it 
should not obtain here. We hope the committee will stake 
out the line of march. 



SS the News Letter has from time to time pointed 
out, Insurance Commissioner Clunie has found himself 
to be an impertinent intermeddler in the affairs of the fire 
companies doing business in California. Under the laws 
of this State he is given autocratic powers; and upon his 
election the Commissioner immediately began to harass the 
insurance business of the city. Possessed of the idea that 
his rulings were not appealable, he undertook the virtual 
confiscation of property. His rulings were preposter- 
ous, and his demands, without benefiting policy holders or 
the public if they had been complied with, would have en- 
tailed almost endless inconvenience and serious loss to the 
^companies. Now Judge Morrow holds that Clun:'e's ruliDg 
-tfi&t the bonds of the companies were invalid, and without 
w^iibb they could do no business, was not justifiable and 
mUsOTall to the ground. The office of Insurance Commis- 
sioner is an important one, but it is not nearly so great as 
' ' e Bersonally estimated head of the present incumbent. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 2, 1898. 



A WORD TO THE RED CROSS SOCIETY: 

THE most skeptical will admit that the ladies of the 
Red Cross Society in this cily have done much good, 
and are now engaged in a.labor of -great practical value. 
They have shown a determination to relieve the tempor- 
ary hardships of the soldiers who come here on their way 
to Manila, and at much personal inconvenience have acted 
the part of the true Samaritan. The scope of their use- 
fulness has, perhaps, exceeded the original intent of the 
organization, but for the most part they have accom- 
plished a gracious work. Following carefully the line of 
present operations, the Red Cross Society can count upon 
the support of the generous people of San Francisco. 

The Nbws Letteh notes, however, that the society has 
launched a proposition to buy and properly equip a hos- 
pital ship at the moderate cost of $300,000. This scheme 
should be dropped at once for several reasons. It is not 
the province of the Red Cross Society ladies to buy or build 
and equip a ship for the use of the Government. They have 
not the money in hand for that purpose, and should use it 
in other directions if they had. The Government is fully 
cognizant of the necessity of such a vessel, and has at 
hand every facility for its acquirement. If the Red Cross 
Society lets it be generally understood that it is going 
into the shipbuilding business, the Government will nat- 
urally abandon the work and wait for the gift — which 
would be a long time coming, if it ever got here. A hos- 
pital ship would have to be porcelain-lined; all articles of 
urniture would have to be made of material that could be 
made antiseptically clean. The use of antiseptics has 
practically obliterated hospital gangrene; but such a ship 
as the promoters of this scheme contemplate in the very 
nature of things would fall far short of the rigid require- 
ments of a properly constructed and properly equipped 
vessel. Anything else would be a distinct step backward, 
and, instead of a boon and a blessing to the suffering, 
would soon become saturated with the germs of disease. 
Built upon right lines, a hospital ship would be of ines 
timable value. Good sewerage, perfect ventilation, in- 
dividual isolation of the patient, pure air — all these would 
make it immensely superior to similar service in the best 
arranged tents, where all these Decessary conditions are 
practically impossible. The society should not become too 
ambitious. Its sphere of usefulness is within present 
limitations. It should stick to them, and allow the Gov- 
ernment to build its own vessels for hospital or any other 
service. 

It is also unfortunate that there is a certain element in 
the Red Cross Society who display more bigotry than 
patriotism, and who appear to be content only when they 
are made conspicuously, not to say immodestly, prominent. 
It had been supposed that any respectable lady might, 
without criticism, take part in the work of the society. 
That it was not necessary that she should be able to trace 
her ancestry back to the Mayflower in order to do gracious 
acts. A cup of coffee or ham sandwich conveyed to the 
hand of a weary volunteer by Mrs. Smith, Browu, or 
Jones gratifies the taste and satisfies the cravings of the 
hungry soldier quite as quickly as if the simpering Miss 
Vere de V'ere or aristocratic Mrs. Knickerbocker per- 
formed that kindly deed. But it is equally true that there 
are members of the society who show a persistent desire 
to draw a miserable sociaf line, and inject into this noble 
charity the distinctions that are native to small, el 
minds. This disgusting feature is so pronounced that 
several of the most prominent ladies of the society have 
retired from active effort, immeasurably humiliated and 
discouraged by this substitution of overblown and self- 
conscious individuality for the courteous, kindly grace 
that is a woman's sweetest charm. 

San Francisco is a generous city, and never fails to re- 
spond to worthy appeal for aid: yet there are certain soli- 
citors for the society who unpleasantly demonstrate the 
fact that the bigotry of patriotism is more objectionable 
and unreasoning than the bisrotry of religion. Pailui 
respond to the demand of these over-zealous and under- 
wise ladies bring down upon the persons appealed to in- 
sinuations against their patriotism; impertinent sugges- 
tions as to the cause of delays in- refusals; and the right 
of individual opinion and influence of personal environment 
are ignored. Such a course is inexcusable in this city, 



and the society owes itself the duty of ending it at once. 
As we observed in the outset, the Red Cross Society is 
eDgaged in a noble work, is accomplishing much good, and 
will be encouraged. by every right-thinkiog citizen so long 
as it clings to the beaten path. The criticisms that are 
made are based upon present conditbns that brings it into 
disrepute and that should be promptly removed. 

Problems Of No two wars are precisely alike. There 
The War. are all sorts and conditions of wars, just as 
there are all sorts and conditions of men. 
There are bloody wars, and wars in which comparatively 
little blood is shed. There are wars absolutely destitute 
of all generalship, and wars in which the skill of the man 
in command wins the day and ends the campaign. There 
was the war in which big guns were first used, and there 
was one in which oows and arrows were discarded and 
something resembling the modern quick-firing rifle was 
used in their stead. Most wars evolve something new. 
Unexpected conditions require and produce new machines 
and methods of both destruction and defense. Our own 
civil strife gave us the Ram and the Monitor and thereby 
revolutionized the naval warfare of the world. It is too 
early yet to determine what the present Hispano-Ameri- 
can car is going to add to man's experiences, but it is 
never too soon to begin to watch for opportunities to learn. 
If peace were to come now, it would be entitled to be 
called "the bloodless war." With the memorable excep- 
tion of the mule's, there has been little blood shed on either 
side. The first three months' fighting has not caused us a 
loss of a score of men, all told. Dewey destroyed, or cap- 
tured a whole fleet without the loss of a single man, and 
this although the ships were tiring at close range. A 
handful of our marines took possession of Cuban soil for a 
loss of some four or five men. Sampson, all this time, has 
been blazing away at the Morro Castles and forts, but, so 
far, has not taken one of tbem. Cervera and his fleet have 
been bottled up, along line of Coast has been successfully 
blockaded, and numerous prizes have been captured, but, 
with the exception of little telegraph destroyer Winslow, 
not one of our vessels has been hit. All of this is a re- 
markable showing. It is being said that enough has been 
done on both sides to justify a peace with honor. If that 
be so, it results that the United States and Spain have 
taught the Nations how to make a great war without doing 
any killing to speak of. 

Well would it be if we could close the account at this 
point. It may be that Hy the time this reaches the 
reader's eye there will be a different tale to tell. It looks 
as if hard fighting may be taking place just now around 
both Santiago and Manila, and it may very well be that 
we shall lose two thousand men before those cities are 
ours. In both places the Spaniards must either fight or 
surrender on demand. Being surrounded, there is no 
such thing for them as retreat. A crisis is at hand that 
will likely be serious for both sides. A lamentable amount 
of slaughter seems inevitable, and that in these enlight- 
ened days, when nobody is supposed to be particularly 
anxious to kill his neighbor, even though that neighbor 
should be a stranger, and the owner of a tine property, 
which it would be contrary to nature not to covet. The 
common people of this country were not conscious that 
they were suffering from anything Spain had done, or left 
undone, until the politicians and the yellow journals told 
them that they were. That they were so ready to believe 
what they were told only shows that a restless people, 
after a long period of depression, were ready for the re- 
creation and excitement of a little blood-letting at the 
first opportunity. The effect is to divert their attention 
from more important considerations, as well as to enable 
their great benefactors, the financiers to wit, to amass 
vast sums of money out of war expenditures, which, in the 
end, the people will have to repay, with interest. 

Perhaps the principal lessons this war will teac'u, is the 
readiness with which a nation may be iuduced to change 
its mist cherished national policy, when tempting fruits 
of foreign conquest appear in sight. Our whole litera- 
ture, history, and national life, have up to now been in- 
stinct with the idea that America was large enough for 
Americans, and that we should never ejtangle ourselves 
in the fruitful causes of strife involved in possessions be- 
yond the sea. In the twinkling of an eye, as it were, all 



July 2, 1898. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



that bas been changed. When Dewey made himself 
master of Manila bay, he enthralled the judgment of his 
countrymen. From that hour to this, no one has oelieved 
that we shall ever let fro of that which he seized. That 
being so. the greatest proolems of the war are about to 
■ iut of our holding of the Philippines. We may per- 
mit the insurgents to manage local affairs, but we shall be 
to tbem as a national government, all the same. The 
making of war, the regulating of commerce, the imposi- 
tion of import duties, and the collecting and expending of 
taxes for general purposes, we shall keep in our own 
hands. Already we have commissioned and dispatched a 
military Governor to attend to these things. It would be 
interesting to learn what instructions have been given 
General Merritt, and there would seem to be no sufficient 
reason why Congress should not call for them. Our mer- 
chants ought about this time to be sending goods to 
Manila, and they are entitled to be informed as to what 
duties they will have to pay, if any. Is our policy of inter- 
State free trade, and protection against all the rest of the 
world, to prevail? Or are we going to adopt England's 
policy of open doors in the East, which we so much ap- 
proved before this war began? That is likely to prove 
the most serious problem arising out of this war. 

The Clergy In It is a noticeable fact that the clergy of our 
The War Eastern States, and particularly of New 
England, are all aglow over the possibili- 
ties of the war. They decline to see in it anything of an 
earthly war making power. According to tbem, the de- 
claration of Congress and the proclamation of the Presi- 
dent of the United States bad nothing to do with letting 
our soldiers, and our war ships, loose to kill, slay and des- 
troy. They see the hand of God in it all, and plainly trace 
His motives and His purposes. He did not design, they 
tell us, that this great and enlightened Republic should 
always remain "a hermit Nation." The expression is 
that of the Reverend Dr. Storrs, the foremost of Congre- 
gational Ministers. Speaking to a recent meeting of his 
fellow clergymen, he said that "God had raised up this 
Great Republic to fulfill a destiny that was everyday be- 
coming more and more manifest. He did not plant here 
more than seventy millions of people and give them the 
Bible, the Schoolmaster and the Preacher, with the inten- 
tion that they should content themselves with beiDg a 
mere hermit Nation. To whom much was given much 
would be expected. America cannot escape or avoid her 
responsibility to share with others the work of carrying 
civilization, enlightenment and progress to the uttermost 
parts of the Earth." All of which, of course, meant that 
we should keep the Philippines, insist upon open doors into 
China, and spread ourselves out over foreign conquests. 
It is, at least, consolatory to know, now that our Jingoes 
are getting their way, that the designs of Providence and 
their plans are identical. We should never have thought 
it, had not so high an authority assured us of the fact. 
We had supposed that the supreme rule of christian con- 
duct was "to do unto others as ye would have them do un- 
to you." It is clear that the taking of the Bible into the 
Philippines is becoming a strong underlying motive in this 
war. 

Times That Are He went up like a rocket and 

Prolific Of for a time dazzled the financial 

Financial Filibustering, sky with his lofty pyrotechnics, 
but now he has come down like 
the stick, in ominous darkness, and with a dull and 
heavy thud. Mr. Ernest Terah Hooley was a multi- 
millionaire a tew weeks ago, but now he is a bankrupt. 
Two short years since he was a stockbroker in a provin- 
cial town in England. By a financial coup, he, at once, at 
the early age of 37 bounded into the first rank of the new 
rich. The sudden rage for bicycling gave him his first lift 
skywards. He bought out the Pneumatic Tire Patent. 
•and the Company that had been formed to operate it, for 
$15,000,000, and within a few weeks had refloated his stock 
upon the public for $25,000,000. To rake in an immense 
fortune of $10,000,000, in less time than it will take our 
officers and men to reach Manila, is certainly a dazzling 
feat. It sufficed to stamp Mr. Hooley as the financial 
genius of the day. The numerous middle classes of Eng- 
land, who are hard set these times to tell how to invest 



their morey, were at his feet. Possessing a talent for ad- 
vertising, he had the "smart" journals interview him, and 
for a time he became a popular rage or mania. He con- 
tinued to shoot upwards in a blaze of notoriety and appar- 
ent prosperity. The stock of companies he floated were 
often subscribed for three or four times over. With more 
golden ducats than he knew what to do with, he soon dis- 
covered that money would buy almost anything. He found 
himself hail-fellow-well met among the younger nobility, a 
favorite among the clergy, and the accepted candidate of 
the Tory party for a seat in Parliament from his native 
town, with a baronetcy in prospect. The purchaser of old 
castles, and ancient demesnes, he became conspicuous as 
"a lord of the soil." Already a churchwarden in his 
native parish, he ingratiated himself with the clergy by 
the munificence of his gifts; among which was the presen- 
tation of a gold service to St. Paul's Cathedral of untold 
value. The Prince of Wales's yacht, the Britannia, and 
Lord Lonsdale's Verona, went to his ownership. But 
enough. It w.ould take columns to tell of the many things 
of which he possessed himself. And now be is bankrupt 
and compelled to ask the law to absolve him from the pay- 
ment of his just debtsl At the pace he went, he would 
have reached the same end, even if he had owned the Bank 
of England. It is said that he endeavored to buy the 
London Telegraph newspaper, but that its present Jewish 
proprietors refused to sell; else England might have been 
treated to a second edition of Young Hearst, and yellow 
journalism. Like Leiter, the erstwhile Wheat King of 
Chicago, Hooley lost his head. 

Had either one of them been a little more cautious in his 
actions and a great deal more moderate in his desires, he 
would not to-day be floundering in dishonor. But these 
were just the lessons that neither of them learned. How 
should they? In their swift, meteoric ascent, neither had 
an opportunity to acquire wisdom and sobriety. Prom the 
moment a young man becomes a recognized millionaire, he 
lives in an atmosphere of sycophancy and publicity, in 
which level-headedness cannot survive. The brain reels, 
the head topples over, and the man is gone. But the lesson 
will not be taken to heart and there will be more Hooley's 
and Letters. The, present plethora of money in England 
and the war expenditures in the United States, are in- 
centives to, and producers of sudden fortunes. It is well 
that these should be dissipated like the morning dew be- 
fore the summer's sun. 

Voting On Federation That was an interesting election 
In Australia. which took place in Australia the 

other day. It was a plebiscite to 
determine whether or not the respective Colonics should 
federate under the terms of a constitution recently framed 
by a convention held in Melbourne, Each Colony, or 
State, as we should call it, was to decide for itself whether 
or not it would come into the proposed Union. If any 
three of them ratified the proposed constitution, the agree- 
ing States were to be free to go ahead and form one 
Dominion; leaving the disagreeing ones to stay out, or 
come in at some future time as they might see fit. The 
result is that by a very narrow majority, New South 
Wales elects to stay out, while Victoria, South Australia 
and Tasmania, by a vote of four to one, decide to unite. 
Neither Queensland, nor Western Australia voted upon 
the question: they being desirous of seeing how the scheme 
worked before adopting it. The action of New South 
Wales was disappointing, but not altogether a surprise. 
Everything possible was done to induce her to cast in her 
lot with the sister Colonies. She was permitted to take 
the lead in the movement all through. Prom the days if 
Sir Henry Parkes down to the present time, her Stales- 
men have been coaxed, and wooed as if they were so many 
coy maidens. Her delegates to the constitutional conven- 
tion were permittrd to have pretty much their own way, 
although they could have been out-voted at any time. The 
other Colonies made sacrifices while she got everything 
sne asked for, save one thing, and that was left an open 
question. Sydney wanted to be the carital of the New 
Dominion, but the convention decided to reserve the ques- 
tion for the decision of the New Federal Parliament, which 
might or might not favor some other city. It being be- 
lieved that, in that case, Sydney would be out of the run- 
ning, and that Melbourne would be the choice of the other 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Julj 2 ,1898. 



Colonies, New South Wales refused to ratify the proposed 
constitution, and elected to stay out and nurse her sore 
head all by herself. It is to be presumed that the three 
Co onies that have been able to agree, will proceed to es- 
tablish a federated government, elect a House of Repre- 
sentatives, and a Senate, levy taxes, and do pretty much 
as our own Colonies did. We, too, started housekeeping 
without all the members of the family being present. But 
in due time they all saw that it would bf more comfortable, 
and in every way better, to be inside. So will it be ulti- 
mately in Australia. There, as here, the recalcitrants 
will get over their pouting and wry faces, and accept the 
good things the gods have provided for them. Meanwhile 
the United States of America salute the United States of 
Australia. 

The Coming The political war horses are prancing 
State Election, around, champing the bits in their 
mouths, and sniffing the battle from afar. 
In other words, the people who make a living out of 
politics are busy preparing for the election of November 
next. The Democrats are the most busy, probably be- 
cause they realize that to have any chance at all, they 
must bring out their best men, organize as never before, 
and put up a most vigorous fight. Under normal condi- 
tions, the State is pretty evenly divided between the two 
great parties, but the conditions at the coming election 
are not likely to be normal. The country is in the midst 
of a most popular war, and is in no humor to weaken the 
administration that made it, and that is, so far, carrying 
it on successfully. The feeling at present is entirely the 
other way. It would not be deemed quite patriotic, at 
this juncture, to harass the Government at home and 
lessen its prestige abroad, by condemning it at the polls. 
If the elections could be postponed for a year, so as to 
give time to pass upon the great issues that are bound 10 
grow out of the war, it would undoubtedly be a good thing, 
and political results might then be different. With pas- 
sions all alive that are being engendered by the pending 
conflict, there will be no sober second thought, and no 
halting on the road on which things are now traveling. 
Unless some unexpected turn in events takes place within 
the next four months, it may be confidently predicted that 
the political current will amount to a torrent in favor of 
the Administration and its party. For this reason, it be- 
hooves honest independent Republicans to see well to it 
that all nominations are such only as are fit to be made. 
It will be lamentable if a party tidal wave is made use of 
for no higher purpose than to carry a host of corruption- 
ists and scoundrels into office. That is the danger, when 
it is known in advance, that a nomination is equivalent to 
an election. We venture the announcement thus early 
that that is the danger which now menaces the Republican 
party in San Francisco. The machinery is being put in 
working order that is intended to give the Bosses such a 
grip on politics as they have not had since Buckley and 
Rainey found it necessary to levant to Canada. We have 
too long watched the signs to mistake their portend. Now 
as ever, the rival Bosses are in fact silent partners, and, 
no matter which wins, the city loses. The war ought to 
purify the atmosphere, exhalt virtue, and intensify love of 
Country, and these things, in their turn, ought to spur us 
to take politics out of the unholy grasp of the marauders 
and thieves who have too long battened and fattened upon 
the body politic. Decent Republicans will dishonor them- 
selves, their city, and their State, if they do not see well 
to the nominations for public office, soon to be made. A 
bad year for Democrats, though it is likely to be, they may 
yet win the local offices, by the superiority of their candi- 
dates. It will be the only way they can win. 

THERE is not much doing from now until next Tuesday. 
Just the time to take a run out to the springs in 
Sonoma County over the San Francisco and North Pacific 
Railway. Fine service, half rates, and splendid scenery. 

Modern Civilization. 
It is observed that nature's supply of lood for iofants is lacking in 
the higher civilization; but the deficiency is perfectly supplied by 
the use of the Gail Borden Eagle Brand Condensed Milk. 

For Sale— Fancy grocery, bakery, nod notion store. Fine location 
Cheap for cash; owner going away. Mrs, M. Horn, -J03H Howard street. 



BLACKMAILERS INDICTED. 

IT is not probable that iu the whole history of California 
there can be found record of a more brazen and disrepu- 
table gang of blackmailers than the operators who made 
an unsuccessful attack upon Captain W. A. Nevills' char- 
acter, and who were indicted last week by the Grand Jury 
for extortion. The black characters of the conspirators 
are so thoroughly established that they are matters of com- 
mon repute; and wherever these people are known their 
power to slander and malign is gone. In Fresno County, 
and out in Tuolumne County, tbey are valued at their true 
worth. In Fresno they looted the farm of the man they 
subsequently levied blackmail on; they were not content 
with stealing his property, but it can be proved that for 
some reason that is not now apparent beyond a brutal de- 
sire, they plotted against his life. The near relatives of 
some of them have been convicted of crime and paid the 
penalty by confinement in jail or penitentiary. Worthless, 
vagabondish by instinct, choice, and practice, the whole 
outfit presents degraded passions and a total absence of 
qualities that entitle them to respect or belief. 

It is an open secret that these people are the will- 
ing dupes and tools of someone who had the brain to hatch 
this miserable plot against Nevills. They were made the 
eager instruments of others, and as is usual in such cases, 
while richly deserving the punishment they seem likely to 
get, their joint agents of infamy will escape. This dis- 
reputable gang adds the basest ingratitude to their other 
wicked accomplishments. The fellow Myron Azhderain 
was picked up by Nevills, given employment, put on bis 
feet and cared for. He repays kindness by conspiring to 
rob his benefactor and ruin his reputation. The women 
in the case are equally culpable. They were befriended 
in a substantial way, and imposed on the man by whose 
generosity they profited. They are known in this com- 
munity, and come of the notorious Neal family that has 
figured as defendants in the criminal docket of this city. 
Turbulent, dissolute, law-breaking, these women have 
added in this case a blacker reputation to a name already 
stained with crime. They cannot plead youth or inex- 
perience. They are middle aged and are cold-blooded, de- 
signing schemers, who took advantage of the unsuspecting 
generosity of the man who assisted them in their hour of 
distress, robbed him, and deliberately undertook to destroy 
his family and blast his reputation. 

This in brief is the record of the gang of blackmailers 
who have been indicted by the Grand Jury for extortion. 
If guilt already established, crimes proved to have been 
committed, and names that are almost everything that 
integrity and virtue are not, avail anything, this band of 
conspirators will be presently landed in the penitential y. 

THE Holmes' Mines, the Georgene Mines, and the Prin- 
cess Mines, a group of sixty-five claims at Cande- 
laria, Nevada, is under option to General S. C. Boyntnn, of 
New York, and a clientele of the Chemical National Bank, 
New York, for $3,500,0110. The examination to confirm 
the vendor's statement will begin about July 7th. The par- 
ties interested in this venture are skilled New York oper- 
ators, and upon previous examinations of the property be- 
lieve it to be one of the best in the West. The Holmes 
Company includes the property originally owned by the 
Northern Belle Company, which produced 113,000,000 and 
paid over $4,000,000 in dividends. The Georgene pro- 
duced upwards of $1,250,000 at a good profit. The 
I'rincess property is fully developed up to a depth of 570 
feet, with a complete hoisting works. The ores in these 
various properties have heretofore been considered valua- 
ble only on account of the amount of silver. It is now 
■monstrated, as they carry nearly $3 in gold, that, had 
they been worked for gold, they would have been consid- 
ered a fairly good low grade proposition. The ores have 
never produced less than 20 ounces as worked, to the ton. 
The tailings and low grade ores, the product of 40 stamps 
for nearly thirty years, and seventy stamps for eight 
years are exempted for the benefit of those interested, as 
well as the low grade ores which did not average more 
than twelve ounces of silver, which were put in separate 
clumps at the time of extraction. 

Jackson's Napa Soda water cures dyspepsia. 



July 2, 1898. 



SAX FRANCISCO XF.WS LETTER. 



!«©7IUPI 



New Tork. 




Jmu -. 



DARIUS Ogden Mills never does anything by halves. 
He heard that the ladies who are running the Red 
Cross Society were in need of funds, so he sentj tbem a 
little $5,000 check. Such good deeds cover a multitude of 
omissions. As a reward Mr. Mills always enjoys the best 
of health. His real estate investments all pay handsome 
interest, even the Mills lodging houses netting thirteen 
per cent., and, Midas like, everything he touches turns to 
gold — paper mills included. As an all around, easy-to- 
realize millionaire, D. O. Mills stands at the head of the 
California delegation — bar none. 

* * * 

Brigadier-General Fred Grant distinguished himself last 
week by having fine white sand spread over the floor of 
his tent. It is such original ideas of studied comfort that 
make Hobsons in the campaign. Fred will get there bye 
and bye, if sham battles and white sand count for any- 
thing. 

* # * 

There is a prospect of war in a New York home this 
coming Fail, and all on account of an innocent diamond 
bracelet that cost only $250 — a mere bagatelle in the 
annual expense account. The head of the house is a Cali- 
fornian, but he married into an old and wealthy New York 
family. He is given to periodical visits to his old 'Frisco 
home. He went in the early spring; he is there again now. 
A week since there came inadvertently to the New York 
home a bill from a leading San Francisco diamond house 
for a number of purchases made by Mr. Hubbie while 
away from Wall street. It was forwarded in regular 
course of mail to Mrs. Hubbie at her summer home, Nar- 
ragansett. She could place all the items except the dia- 
mond bracelet, and now she thinks she has him where Joe 
Leiter thought he had the wheat, There will be a hot 
time in hubbie's home when he returns, in appearance as 
guileless as a cherub and innocent as a lamb. 

* # * 

It is whispered in journalistic circles that the cause of 
M. H. de Young's rather extended stay in New York just 
now is a series of operations down in Wall street that he 
is nursing along with the skill of an Ives at cushion caroms. 
He coppered what "they all said" and came out ahead. 
Usually newspaper men are not adepts at the ways of 
Wall street, although "they say" that Willie Hearst has 
made several big killings since his advent in New York, 
and that he can run the Journal for a year on a single 
amp in Metropolitan Traction stock. De Young is re- 
ported to be sweet on Sugar and Western Union. 

* * * 

And so Nat Messer has had "inflooance" enough at 
Washington to prefix the title of "Captain" to his name. 
"Well, there won't be many handsomer men in the army 
than Captain Nat," said John Gray, who knew him on 
Pine street. But will it be necessary for Nat and "Jim/' 
Flood to part when duty calls? 

* * * 

Bishop John P. Newman's flocks in California will be re- 
j liced to hear that their prayers have been listened to; 
that the beneficent waters of Saratoga have been as the 
balm of Gilead to their shepherd, and he will not be com- 
pelled to sever his relations with his people, as he once 
feared would be the result of his continued illness. Sara- 
toga is a healthful place, and the average sick man who 
can afford to stay there awhile, drink the waters, and 
take in all the other dissipations, is sure of getting well. 
Bishop Newman will be a big ad. for Saratoga this season. 

* * * 

James R. Keene, so far this season, has entered but two 
horses in races, Gold Pick and Loiterer, and each won 
his race. Dropping in at a thoroughbred yearling sale 

Jackson's Napa Soda is the finest table water in the world. 



oae evening last week, Mr. Keene added to his already 
plethoric stable a couple of Hanoverian youngsters at a 
cost of little less than $5,000. Business on Wall street is 
looking up, they say, when Keene buys horses. 

* # # 

Handsome Olive Chamberlin can keep a secret. For 
■ix months she bad been married to a son of the Harpers, 
of publishing fame, and even her mother was not 
acquainted with the fact; finally it only leaked out — be- 
cause her husband was going to the war. If Olive isn't a 
Daughter of the Golden West, she ought to be, for her 
mother is the beautiful Emily Thorne Jordan, who had 
half San Francisco's beaux camping on her trail when she 
played at the old Metropolitan Theatre years ago. She 
was the daughter of Charles R. Thorne, who died a few 
years since, and married Prince John Chamberlin, of ter- 
rapin fame. The mother accepts the situation philo- 
sophically, and will chaperone her married daughter until 
the Captain comes marching home from Manila. 

* # # 

A few among the numerous Californians who have busi- 
ness in New York just now: Frank J. Carroll, Prince 
Poniatowski, Z. S. Spaulding, C. F. Curry, H. L. E. 
Meyer, William H. Crocker, Ben Schloss, H. T. Dutton, 
F. J. Devlin, Charles B. Hawley. 

* * * 

The late Mr. Charles A. Dana's Sun and the present 
Mr. William R. Hearst's Journal have pooled all their 
issues for joint attack upon Mr. Pulitzer and his World. 
The Sun and Journal each have the only dispatch boat that 
ever gets in the line of fire when Sampson bombards the 
fortifications. It is the "Simpson," Captain O. Leary, 
which does duty for both. Somebody once said that oil 
and water wouldn't mix. 

* * * 

Advertising for the fall season in the theatrical world 
has already commenced, and Edna Wallace ex-Hopper, 
the charming little Californian, is the pioneer. The papers, 
announce it as a remarkable case of "nasal hemorrhage," 
which simmers down into a pronounced nose bleed, caused 
by a heroic attempt on the surgeon's part to improve her 
vocal organs. She wants to catch on to high C or some- 
thing. 



Up in Newport every villa has a distinctive name, and 
when Mr. Potter Palmer, of the Palmer House, Chicago, 
took the Havemeyer place, he was somewhat surprised 
and delighted at its suggestive designation — "Friedham" — 
but Mrs. Palmer was not quite so sure that it was signi- 
ficantly appropriate. It was not translated to the Prince 
of Belgium while he was Friedham's guest. 



James B. Haggin has taken a brace of cottages at 
Narragarisett for himself and his young bride, and will 
open house Saturday, June 25th. He will have as 
special guests a number of his grandchildren, and only 
young people will have the entry to the cottages. 
* * * 

The boot is now on the other leg; it is plain John Chat- 
terton, alias Signor Perugini, who sueth to be divorced 
a rnensa et tho'ro from Lillian Russell Solomon Leonard 
Chatterton, the handsome prima ,<ionna, who goes pres- 
ently to Berlin to lay siege to Wilbelm's susceptible ad- 
miration. Everybody was curious to know the grounds 
alleged for the divorce, but it simmers down to prosaic 
"desertion." Entke Nous. 

THE finest country for a few davs' outing is along the 
line of the San Francisco and North Pacific Railw 
in Sonoma County. Half-fare from now until July 5th. 



H/WE YOU ft SON, BROTHER. 



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25c. package of Allen's Foot-Ease, a powder for the feet. All 
who march, walk, or stand need it. It cures aching, tired, sore, 
swollen, sweating feet, Tind makes hot, tight, or new shoes easy. 
Feet can't Blister, get Sore or Callous where Allen's Foot-Ease 
Is used. 10,000 testimonials. All druggists and shoe stores sell 
it, 25o. Samples sent FREE. Address Allen S. Olmsted, Le 
Roy, N. Y. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 2, i? 



A=r^. 




Pleasures v^nd 

" We obey no wand but pleasure's."— Tom Moore. 



THE pomp and circumstance of war 
were lavished over the Columbia 
Theatre last Monday evenicg, but not all 
the flying of flags in the vestibule, the boxes stuffed with 
warriors, the descent of a gigantic stars and stripes for 
an act drop, a Brigadier-General in full regimentals re- 
sponding to the " author " calls, could hide the hand of 
the amateur in the play. It leaves its clumsy prints on 
every act. 

The information that General King speaks slightingly of 
his own literary efforts, and says that soldiering is the 
business of his life, was not very encouraging, in spite of 
the popularity of his war stories. It is the attitude of an 
amateur playwright to think that anything is more impor- 
tant than writing plays. Passable stories may be written 
with second best attention, but good plays never. The 
name of Miss Evelyn Greenleaf Sutherland as collaborator 
was not encouraging either. We saw her prettily con- 
ceived and badly made IV Whiti Trath the week before 
last. She, like General King, evidently desires to make 
the drama literary, and so inclines to the ling and irrele- 
vant speech. All over the play ihere are these descriptive 
speeches which novelist-playwrights cannot get away 
from, during which the actors who are being recited at 
have to stand or sit like dummies, or else indulge in the most 
absurd and inhuman bye-play,— for any bye-play is absurd 
and inhuman under such circumstances. In the second 
act, for instance, Mr. Edwards aDd Miss La Verne are 
trotted out to do a comic turn in the snow. Miss La Verne 
has a long speech about her stockings, her waist measure, 
and such things, after which oxeunt, without Mr. Edwards 
having said a word or having any provision whatever 
made for him by the authors. Now what can an actor do 
with a scene like that '! In the third act the same pair 
have another comic turn in the middle of a ballroom, the 
rest of the company standing round in a semi-circle like a 
grand opera chorus: no provision made for them either. 
And this is not the only instance of the kind. To forget to 
provide for the actors who are not speaking is the hall- 
mark of the amateur playwright. 
• * # 

Fort Frayne was originally written as a play, then the 
manuscript was lost; then it was written as a novel, and 
now it is a play again. As the programme eloquently 
puts it, "Fort Frayne, by Brigadier-General Ohas. King, is 
adapted from the drama of the same name, of which, in 
collaboration with Evelyn Greenleaf Sutherland and Emma 
V. Sheridan Fry, he is the author of." 

It consists of three acts of melodrama and one of farce 
comedy. The curtain rises on the villain (a private, Troop 
C, 12th U. S. Cavalry), an Indian private, and a group of 
supes who are decorating the barracks for Christmas. 
All the characters dribble in during this act, some with 
purpose and some without. " The long arm of coincidence" 
is busy among them. The villain is the husband of the 
heroine, who is the hired companion of his mother. Both 
ladies have spasms of recollection whenever they catch his 
eye, but neither knows him for the man until at the 
of the act he reveals himself to the heroine, a meek and 
tearful person who was hoping she was a widow. The 
villain's mother is also ignorant that her companion is her 
daughter in-law. It is really very complicated. It takes 
the whole first act to present the hypothetical situation. 
There is an incident in this act, so abruptly introduced 
and ended that it seems to flare up and fizzle out as sud- 
denly as a sky rocket, and leaves you wondering what it 
was for. The hero, a Captain of the 12th, rushes on and 
finds the Indian on the point of murdering the villain. He- 
separates them with a few appropriate remonstrances, 
but does not punish them because it is Christmas. 

The same situation occurs again in the second act, when 
the Captain rushes on just in time to prevent the villain 
from maltreating the heroine. This time, Christmas or 
no Christmas, he orders him to the guard-house, for he 



loves the heroine. The villain thereupon proclaims her to 
be his wife, murders the Indian, and goes off with the 
ffuards. But there are other repetitions more unsophisti- 
cated still. At the beginning of this second act Mr. 
Frawley and Miss Campbell, the serious juveniles, march 
C, have a misunderstanding, and exeunt severally. Im- 
mediately afterwards Mr. Hickman and Miss Winter, the 
frivolous juveniles do precisely the same thing, as if 
burlesquing the former scene. Next come Mr. Edwards 
and Miss La Verne to do their little comic turn, — the one 
I have already mentioned, in which Mr. Edwards has no 
part to play, — then exeunt. Three short detached lovers' 
scenes in succession, like so many variety turns. 

And wWt does it all lead up to? A mere cul de so. of a 
situation. The villain sets the guard-house on fire, — 
alarums and excursions. The hero is blinded, for no pur- 
pose that I can see except to let him wear a green eye- 
shade in the last act. The villain of course is killed. He 
is borne into the ballroom on a stretcher. His mother 
lifts the cloth to look at his face, not knowing that it is 
the face of her son. She is implored not to look at him. 
She soliloquizes, drops the cloth without looking, and the 
corpse is borne out. Could anything be more exasper- 
ating? Every license of coincidence taken, all these 
preparations and then no climax — nothing but a farce- 
comedy act and a wedding. 

# * * 

The Frawley Comuany deserves every indulgence from 
the critics this week. I offer them my sincere condolence. 
Seventeen characters in the play and not one good acting 
part among them. The principals are treated the worst. 
Mr. Bell simply walks through his part and speaks his 
lines, like a soldier and a gentleman, without attempting 
to act, but what else can the poor man do? In the scene 
after the discovery that his love is already a wife, he is as 
unprovided for as Mr. Edwards earlier in the act, and has 
to stand and listen while Miss Bouton makes a long speech 
about a baby, pantomiming the imaginary infant with her 
left arm. Miss Bouton is frankly mtlo-dramatic, and again 
I say what else can she be ? A regular Morosco part hers 
is. She traipsies around in the snow, suitably attired in 
a long black cloak with the hood falling off behind, hysteri- 
cal over her wrongs and remembrances. She makes a 
good deal out of her sobbing exit. Her business in the 
third act is to sit and look out of the window while the 
others dance the lancers, to pluck at the Colonel as he 
goes bv in the grand chain and takes no notice of her, and 
to shriek in chorus with all the other actresses. Mr. 
Burke is the conventional villain of melodrama, slouching 
and snarling. Miss Carey is cheated out of anything like 
a strong scene because her authors have given her heart 
disease, and so she has to content herself with being a nice 
old widow lady, gazing affectionately at her husband s por- 
trait, and smiling maternally upon her young friends and 
relatives. Mr. Frawley and Miss Campbell both have 
thankless parts, though the former gains thunderous 
applause with a topical speech. Mr. Roberts can only 
show bis an in a triumphant makeup as the Indian. 

The comedians are supposed to have the parts, especially 
Miss La Verne as the impossible amorous old maid, and, by 
employing every eccentricity of dress and laugh, she does 
succ* ed in amusing ber audience a good deal. Mr. Ed- 
wards makes all that could be made out of the very scanty 
opportunities bis farce part gives him. Mr. Hickman as 
a priggish officer, and Miss Winter as a horrid girl, sup- 
ply the rest of the comic relief. In the last act they are 
to be married, but a swollen river divides them. Lean- 
der swims the Hellespont to reach Hero. While he is in 
peril of his life, Miss Winter, as Hero, is engaged in comic 
tantrums, while the rest watch him from the window, ex- 
i '1 aiming: " He swims acros«!" "He sinks!" "No! — he 
ts the tide!" "Ha! — be is safe!" etc., and, when 
I 'under enters, Hero refuses to have anything to do with 
him because he is wet. A farce treatment of a romantic 
situation, but of course it gains a laugh. What a play ! 

* * » 

Mr. George Foster Piatt certainly knows how to write 

interesting play. His Hatter of Ceremonies proved 

that, and if his Frederick the (irmt was all up to the level 

■ second act, he would have written a very brilliant 

comedy. The swiftness, the humor, and the variety of 



July 2, 1898. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



this act are admirable. All the acts are entertaining, but 

tl that he shows himself likely to tx 
a dramatist of distinction. There are delijrhtful CO 

- and situations in it. That excellent situation where 
Friti Hiitsen is forced, by his own prevarication, to make 
love to the Countess Swart zfeld, while his infuriated 
father, to whom the lady is affianced, is held off bv Fred- 
erick, is too long sustained in the performance, but that 

mlt of sta>;<> direction and not of the play. Frederick 
- full of action and good acting parts, as be- 
comes an actor's play, but an author of so much resource 
as Mr. Piatt should really have got beyond using the 
soliloquy and the aside to such an extent, or at all: these 
devices are distinctly immodern and unskillful. I must 
criticise, too, the easy fate of Baron von Trenck, who for 
a traitor, and in return for repeated insults offered to the 
royal person, is let off altogether too easily to suit artistic 
justice. The dialogue is moderately good; comparedjto 
most of the plays we see on the stage it is very good. 

The best acting is done by Miss Roberts, and Mr. Piatt, 
the author. Miss Roberts is excellent in the excellent part 
r.f La Barbarina, an Italian dancer kidnapped by His 
Majesty of Prussia. Her indignation at the coldness of 
the Prussian court when she dances before them, she — an 
artist — with all Italy at her feet: her naivete wheu she 
recovers her temper, — the extreme femininity of the pet- 
ted and capricious artist: here is an excellent comedy 
character, and Miss Roberts shows due appreciation for 
its truth and its humor, and wears a superb Italian make- 
up. Mr. Piatt is a good actor, with an excellent voice 
and delivery, and he plays the part of Fritz Hiilsen with 
great good humor. Of course, Mr. Lewis Morrison has the 
star part of Frederick, and he plays it with all his accus- 
tomed artificiality and exaggeration, and seems always to 
be posing for prints of the old actors. If Mr. Denithorne 
has a natural way of speaking and a natural way of de- 
porting himself, I wish he would employ them on the 
stage, for his absurd affectations, which I used to hope he 
would outgrow, — for he seems young, — have become a 
chronic trouble. Mr. Wallace Shaw as Voltaire, is treated 
about the least well by the author, but he treats himself 
to an excellent make-up. The smaller parts are mostly 
fairly well filled, but the pitch of Miss Foster's voice is 
getting too high again. The uniforms and dresses are up 
to the high standard of the Alcazar, ever since the "cos- 
tume" season began. 

* * * 

Von Suppe's Boccaccio has been doing well at the Tivoli 
this week, which shows that a good light opera will attract 
the people even though it be an old one. The Mikado is 
to be revived next week, when Mr. West and Miss Sea- 
brooke return to the Tivoli. The next revival will be Von 
Suppe's martial opera, Fatinitza, and after it comes The 
Circus Queen. 

Next week, Mrs. Alice J. Shaw, the American whistler, 
known throughout Europe as "la belle siffieuse," and the 
most famous of all whistlers, will appear at the Orpheum. 
She will be accompanied by two whistling daughters. 
Douglass & Ford, dancers, will also appear, and the hold- 
overs include Zamora the Mexican, and the three Watson 
sisters, who have been doing daring trapeze acts all this 
week, the Four Cohans, and several others. 

Fort F'-ayne will be continued at the Columbia for an- 
other week. 

Ballenberg's well-known orchestra will render a musical 
programme on the verandas of Haywards Club House, at 
the terminus of the Haywards Electric Railway, on Sun- 
day, July 3, from 12 to 5 p. m. Take Haywards cars at 
Fruitvale station, the terminus of the broad-gauge local. 

THE crowd that gravitates countryward is swelling 
rapidly, and an army departs every day for the sum- 
mer resorts along the line of the San Francisco and North 
Pacific Railway. This road reaches nearly all the popular 
springs that are the wonder of Sonoma and adjoining 
counties, and as its service is first-class, the trains of the 
S. F. and N. P. Railway are filled daily with depart- 
ing citizens and their families. 

Flag Pins, Buttons, Belt Buckles, Hat Pins, etc., sterling silver, enam- 
elled, and gilt. .1. N. Brittain, Jeweler, 22 Geary street. 



Kick if you dou't get pure Jackson's Napa Soda. 



THE handsome, double-plate half-tone that is presented 
with to-day's News Letteh gives a beautiful and in 
Struotlve view of the hospital drill corps, the blue-blooded 
Astor mountain battery, and a gun squad at practice at 
Camp Merritt. The pictures are full of life, and form a 
most appropriate complement to the military atmosphere 
that envelops the city, and the martial spirit and senti- 
ment of the Fourth of July. To-day's New s Letteh is an 
excellent companion for Sunday, or is just the thing to 
send to absent friends. 

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C' L ' Tl J_ The "Gem 11 Theatre of the Coast. 

OlUrnDia I hea'tre, Friedlander, Gottlob&Co., Lessees 

Tremendous success ! Continued for another week t Special 
holiday matinee Monday. The great Frawley Company, pre- 
senting Brigadier-General King's military drama, 

FORT FRAYNE. 

The most perfect play of its kind yet written. 
July 11th: Lost—24 Hodbs. 



Tivoli Opera House. 



Mrs. Ernestine Kreling, 

Proprietor and Manager, 

Last nights of the tuneful opera, BOCCACCIO. 
Next week, Gilbert & Sullivan's favorite opera, 

THE MIKADO. 

Great cast; reappearances of the favorites, Elvia Crox Sea- 
brooke and William H. West. Beautiful scenery; correct cos- 
tumes: appr 'priate accessories. 
Next: Fatinitza. 
Box office always open. (NoPhone.) Popular prices, 25c. and 50c. 



Orpheum. 



San Francisco's "Greatest Music Hall. O'Farrell St., 
between Stockton and Powell streets. 



Week commencing Monday. July 4th. 
Monday, July 4th. 



Special holiday matinee, 



MRS. SHAW AMD DAUGHTERS. 

World's famous whistlers and society entertainers; Douglas & 
Ford, songs and dances; Falk & Semoo, musical artists; three 
Watson sisters and Zamora,' wonderful aerialists; Charles 
Wayne, eccentric comedian; Anna Caldwell, comedienne; Jones. 
Grant & Jones, colored comedy trio. Last week of The Four 
Cohans; The Two Judges, acrobatic equilibrists. 
Matinees Wednesday, Saturday, and Suoday. 
Reserved seats 25c; balcony 10c'; opera chairs and box seats 50o. 

r\ 1 TL -L- Fred Belasco, Lessee. 

rUCaZar I heaXre. Mark Thall, Manager. 'Phone Main 254. 

Will surely charm you. Lewis Morrison in the historical comedy, 

FREDERICK THE GREAT. 

Monday, July 4th: Extra Holiday Matinee. Seats now on sale. 
Our original prices: 15c. 25c, 35c, 50c 
Seats by 'Phone, Main 254. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 2, 1898. 



GAMING AT MONTE CARLO. 




Eiilran<-e to Monte Carlo. 



Dear Blanche : We arrived in this Eden from Mar- 
seilles about 6 v. m. I fully expected to be disap- 
pointed, as I have been in so many others, and accordingly 
was, for Monte Carlo was far beyond the realization of all 
my expectations. 
We came with no w— 
hopes of " break- I 
ing the bank," for 
we are aware that 
the Prince receives 
an annual income 
of five millions from 
it independent of 
the profits of the 
game, which are 
enormous. 

During dinner on 
the evening of our 
arrival w e were 
pleasantly startled 
by the very familiar 
strains of " The 
Man that Broke 
the Bank at Monte Carlo," from the band, which plays 
in a caff near ; but out on the terrace overlooking 
the sea there is a grand concert from 8 to 10 every 
evening of an entirely different class of music. It is like a 
beautiful dream to wander up and down the white terraces 
in the warm evening, listening to genuine music, and 
breathing in the tropic odor of the flowers; but I assure 
you it is even more entrancing to sit at the roulette table. 
What shocking taste, you will say ? Please, don't ! You 
never sat there, or you would not dispute my word. 

The evening of our arrival, Asthore did not seem in- 
clined to hasten our introduction to the alluring game, but 
he finally yielded to my entreaties. There is a certain 
amount of red tape to be gone through in procuring ad- 
mission cards, and many questions are to be answered, 
some of them ridiculous and absurd. They have to take 
precautions here, however, and no one is allowed to enter 
without showing the card, for no resident of Monaco is 
allowed to gamble. The casino, as you enter, is bewilder- 
ingly beautiful and bright, and Asthore and I approached 
one of the tables merely to watch the others play. 

The long green covered tables have the wheel in the cen- 
ter, on either side of which sits a banker who takes in or 
gives out the money lost or won; and there is also an 
accomplice sitting at each end of the table. The game has 
represented on the table thirty-six points, also zero and 
rouge et noir, which can be played for any amount from 
five francs up. The contagion subsequent to watching 
others play is rapid and sure, so presently I slipped a five- 
franc piece on the table at random. Presto ! I had fifteen 
francs in my possession. Here is where common sense 
generally departs and one becomes a hopeless victim. My 
doom was sealed; Asthore looked upon me with pitying 
eyes. I continued to play, in absolute ignorance of the 
game, likewise the hour, or the year, sometimes losing, 
sometimes winning, until I was dragged away, still fifteen 
francs richer than when I began. Before attacking the 
game next day I had a complete understanding of its 
works, and we each started in with a certain amount to 
play, to win or lose, and stop, without losing more. This 
is the only way to do, unless you have money for fuel. Luck 
was ours — the usual luck of the novice, which was too 
good to last, for we eventually contributed our mite 
towards the Prince's support. 

My first winning of consequence was in placing the five- 
franc piece (we were not plungers), on the line between 
two numbers. I won nicety frai cs. This was a long shot, 
the chances being two out of thirty-six. for if either num- 
ber divided by the line had come out in the wheel, I would 
have won half of what a number alone wins. Oh, there 
are devious alluring ways to win or lose in this game, as 
in the little game at Ingleside. 

In a brief period of time and with a small capital one can 
run the gauntlet of all emotions peculiar to this game. I 
know I had my share of joy and misery out of it. We 



only played for the experience to be gained! Well, event- 
ually we became bankrupt; and while Asthore went off to 
smoke his chagrin away, I, like many a fool before me, dived 
into my own private purse, determined to win back our 
vanished sheckels. Strange to say, and contrary to tra- 
dition, I did win them back and a splendid sum besides, 
which I laid away pending our return to Paris. My luck 



Terror* of Monlt Carlo Looking Seaward. 

was really marvelous, but as I played carefully (five francs 
at a time), I did not break the bank, as I might have done 
had I played as recklessly and extravagantly as a rich, 
misguided Englishman I saw. He would drop two-inch 
stacks of louis d'or here and there on the table, and see 
them swept in every time. I never saw him win, yet he 
kept on doggedly, persistently, and was so engaged when 
I, feeling I had won enough for respectability, left the 
game to tell Asthore, whom I found promenading the ter- 
race in the moonlight with a guard following him. It was 
too funny. He told me he had had occasion to jot down 
something in writing, when the guard spied him, and from 
then on followed him, believing him to be a despondent 
would-be suicide leaving his last will and testament. He 
must have been relieved when he saw me march him vic- 
toriously away. 

One sees many amusing characters around the tables 
here, nearly all superstitious in the extreme. If one table 
is unlucky, another is tried; some people are hoodoos, 
others are not; the majority are hoodoos, however. 

Beautiful Monte Carlo ! We shall have to leave soon. If 
we stayed here much longer, I shouldn't care whether I 
ever saw the Roman Forum, Saint Peter's much-kissed 
toe, the gondolas of Venice, the streets of Cairo, or even 
dear old San Francisco. Dixie. 



There was a biographical sketch of Gladstone pub- 
lished in a Turkish paper in 1876. It stated that he was 
Bulgarian by birth, but, going to London with some pigs 
which his master desired to sell, and desiring to become 
an Englishman, he changed his Bulgarian name, Orozadin, 
for Gladstone. 



Rich Creamy Head 

Evans" Ale 

Ripe Mellow Flavor 

Evans 1 Ale 

Without Sediment 

Evans* Ale 

Clear to Last Drop 

Evans' Ale 

SHERWOOD II SHERWOOD 

Pacific Coast Agents 

Portland, San Francisco, Los Angelea 





FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




A PATRIOT— a patriot of 1898 !— went out last Monday 
in a State tuc to deliver his good wishes to certain of 
the soldiers bound Manilaward. This patriot has a thirst 
and so has his friends. He remembered that another true 
patriot had mysteriously handed him a package and as 
mysteriously begged that it be carefully handed up to cer- 
tain officers on one of the transports. It was hot on Mon- 
day, and one patriot, who gives excursions at the expense 
of the State, remembered the package. "We can't get 
near the Para, can we ? " he soliloquized. "It's entirely 
too dangerous now, ain't it ? " Then he saw Captain Phil 
Browne. "Why, there's the Governor Markham. Does 
she not plow up the water ? It is quite dangerous to be 
near her," and then he ordered the tug to hold away from 
the transports. "Boys," said he, "let us drink to the 
health of those brave men who are going to Manila," and 
he produced some bottles of whiskey. The health of the 
boys was drunk enthusiastically, and particularly that of 

the officer to whom the liquor was to be sent. 

* * * 

A good story is rife anent the recent 
paper chase at San Rafael, and some 
gossip is current about a couple of par- 
ticipants that strayed from the sport 
and went off on a trail of their own on 
i the "q. t.," the man being well known 
as a thorough hound and the woman as 
a hare well worth chasing. It so hap- 
pened that the long June day was so 
lovely under the shade of the trees, and 
as no lengthening shadows came to warn 
them of its dying, the contented couple 
sat on, oblivious that the hour was long 
past when the "finish" was expected. 
It was fully nine o'clock when they reached 
the hotel, and of course ran the gauntlet 
of a shower of interrogation points. The 
garrulous old Dame was on watch, too, at the front win- 
dow, so no wonder gossip began. 

* * * 

A rare illustration of the gracious qualities that distin- 
guish some lovely women may be observed in all their de- 
lightful excellence at the docks whenever the troop trans- 
ports sail away for Manila. Hordes of well-dressed women 
flock thither and boldly march on to tugs hired by private 
parties; or if they happen to possess a friend who has some 
influence with a tug boat company, then, verily, that 
man's life is made a burthen. There is not the slightest 
patriotism about these women. What they want is a free 
outing on the bay. Society women to the pestiferous lot- 
tery peddler rush madly to these boats and drive the crew 
almost insane in their frantic efforts to get aboard. They 
have no conception other than that their own sweet selves 
should have their tastes gratified. Their cry is, "We are 
going to let the boys know that we are wishing them god- 
speed." Nice patriotism ! It is the same sort of patriot- 
ism that made those two young women on Hyde street and 
other streets openly hug and kiss a brace of volunteer 
officers; the same patriotism that is going to be the cause 
of a new batch of divorces; the same patriotism that made 
the wife of an officer of a departing regiment take to her 
hearth a strange officer the night her husband sailed away 

on the Peking ! 

* * * 

What is sweeter than a night in June — especially such 
nights as we are now having, not to speak of the days — 
but ah, what is so sweet as youth — sweet, innocent youth. 
When the forty line limit is reached and there is a tendency 
toward increasing waist — well never mind. The youth 
with the saintly face, the Vandyke beard, the faraway 
eyes and the general make-up of a dilettante has been 
hunting lilies-of-the-valley. Florist stores almost close up 
shop when this love-striken youth appears. San Jose, San 
Rafael, Sausalito, Santa Barbara, Los Angeles and San 
Diego have been telephoned to supply these flowers. One 



dollar a spray is offered. And why'.' Because a girl ex- 
pressed a wish for it. Happy girll Unhappy man!! And 
ten chances to one she will pin it in the lapel of another 
man's coat when she receives it. 



IF you don't like the noise and confusion of the Fourth of 
July go into the country over the San Francisco and 
North Pacific Railway, the picturesque route of California. 



The very best gentlemen's underwear, shirts, collars, cuffs and 
neckties are kept by John W. Carmany, 25 Kearny street. His 
stock of gentlemen's furnishing goods is complete. 



When playing poker drink Jackson's NaDa Soda. 

CERTAIN CURE ' INDIGESTION. 

DR. PAGET, the famous English practitioner, says the only cure as 
well as preventative for dyspepsia is ; 

" 1st— Eat slowly. 

"2nd— Drink weak whisky and water with your meals. The White 
Horse Cellar— bottled in Scotland— is in my opinion the hest for purity 
and age. 

"3rd— Give over drinking tea with butcher meat; it is a certain source of 
indigestion, and so are cheap wines and spirits. 

'' 4th— Rest half-an-bour after eating, and take plenty of exercise in the 
cool of the day; and, bar accident, one may live to a mellow old age." 

Direct from distillers Always the same 
pure, mellow, matured Scotch malt. 

Sold by all respectable dealers. 
Being a high-priced whisky, many don't 
keep it if they can sell another brand, 
therefore insist on getting it. 

MACKiE <6 COY, DISTILLERS, LTD. 

Islay, Glenlivet, and Glasgow. 



WTKe Old Blend 
Whisky 

f h M Horse 

FROM THE 

Origigai. 

- Recipe 




Sole Agents. 



CHARLES MEINECKE & CO, . 

314 Sacramento St . , S. F 



Moet& 
Cbandon 



White Seal (Grand Cuvee) of ex- 
ceptional bouquet and dryness. 



-Court Journal. 



Ring Up Main 122 



United Carriage Company 

rr , Palace Hotel. Carriages, Coupes, and Victorias 

at all hours 

Ring Up Main 12 

Pacific Transfer Company 

20 Sutter Street. Only company which, checks hag- 
gage at residences. 

Josepn Gillott's Steel Fens, 

Gold Medals. Paris, 1878-1889. These pens are " the 
best in the world." Sole agent for the United States, 
Mr. Henry Hob, 91 John street, New York. 
Sold by all Stationers. 



DR. cJ. NICHOLS, 



(Formerly County Physician of Amador County.) 
Office: 21 Powell street, corner Powell and Ellis. Residence, 
St, Nicholas Hotel, Market St. Hours : 1 to 4 p. m. ; 7 to 8 p. m. 
Established since 1872 in San Francisco. 



JoTOTiia. 



As a table water is unsurpassed. 
— London Hospital Gazette. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 2, 1898. 



NOT A SANITARIUM. 

CALIFORNIA bas many beautiful pleasure resorts— 
many places where the grand and the picturesque 
are blended, but among them all stands pre-eminent Lytton 
Springs, which is situated seventy miles distant from 
'his city on the San Francisco and North Pacific Railway. 
The ride to this famous pleasure resort is through a coun- 
try of delightfully changing scenery, and the guest is con- 
veyed from the depot to Lytton through a vista of stately 
oaks, with charmiDg glimpses here and there of the further 
distance. 




1;.*>*-T 



Lytton Sprl 

About the hotel in picturesque arrangement are scat- 
tered pretty cottages, where perfect privacy may be ob- 
tained without sacrificing any of the comforts of the mod- 
ern residence. The hotel at Lytton is a model, and it is 
lighted by electricity, steam-heated throughout, broad 
verandas, shady walks, bright sunny rooms, picnic grounds, 
and out-door games make up a home that never fails to 
delight the guests. Lytton Springs is not a sanitarium. 
It is not a place specially maintained for the care of sick- 
people. It is in no sense a refuge for those who are ill. It 
is a delightful home for those who want a month's rest 
from business cares, who love pure air, out-door exercise, 
— hunting and fishing. The hotel grounds comprise one 
thousand acres of beautifully wooded hills, glens and lawns, 
from which the most magnificent views are obtained. Lyt- 
ton is an ideal place for a summer's outing, for any or all 
classes, but Mr. W. M. Ward, the capable and energetic 
manager, desires it to be distinctly understood that it is 
in no sense a sanitarium. 

The rates at Lytton are most reasonable, running from 
$8 to $12 per week. 

THERE is as much patriotism in the country as the 
city. A half-fare ticket is issued by the San Fran- 
cisco and North Pacific Railway, which will give you a 
five days' outing in the romantic Redwoods of Sonoma 
County. Leave business for a few days and take a glimpse 
of the splendid scenery along the line of that road. 

A Panorama 440 Miles Lonj 
From the Observation Oar on the New York Central a living pan. 
orama 440 miles long may be seen. This includes the Oenesse, 
Black Kiver and Mohawk Valleys and 143 miles of the Hudson 
River, including the foothills of the Adirondack Mountains; the 
Capitol at Albany: the Catskill Mountains: the Palisades of the 
Hudson and the New York Central's magnificent approach to the 
metropolis— this being the only trunk line whose traiDr enter the 
city of New York. 

The fact may not be generally known but a large quantity of 
J. F. Cutter and Argonaut whiskey was taken by the fleet of troop 
ships that sailed away Monday for Manila. Officers are excellent 
judges of good liquors and they all wanted these fine brands, for 
which E. Martin & Co.. 411 Market street, are sole Pacific Coast 
Agents. 



FiNEstationery.steelana copper-plate engraving. 
Marbetstreet.San Francisco- 
Sober up on Jackson's Napa Soda. 



Cooper & Co , 748 



3unnER R E SOR TS 




fMot^l £1 pa$o d^ I^oblojs 



Under new management 



BEST CURATIVE 

AND BATHING 

WATERS 

IN AMERICA 

Cuisine First Class. 



Appointments unsurpassed. Tub, plunee.mud 
and swimming baths in most powerful sul- 
phur waters In the world, insuring quick 
and permanent cures for rheumatism, liver, 
kidney and skin diseases. Magnificent re- 
treat for pleasure and recreation. Very hot 
sulphur Mud Baths, 122 F. ; Soda Springs, 
77 P.; main Sulphur Sprlntr, 107 F Terms 
$10 to $28 per week Two blocks from rail- 
road station. Further particulars apply to 
Traveler, 20 Montgomery street, or 
Otto E. Never, Prop., Paso Robles, Cal. 




}Hotels C^azad^ro ar>d El i/T\ 

IN BEAUTIFULS0N0MA COUNTY 

Ga'eway to Paradise, at terminus North 
Pa- iflo Coast R. R. No staging; only ten 
tui li*s fr. m ocean; hotels short mile apart 
uui'er one management; best of attention, 
bo» Hog riding, tennis, driving, fishing, 
aho >tlng and outdoor swimming Open 
all vear. Rates. |H to 114 per week. 
Further particulars, 
F. M. Can-D, Manager, Cazadero. 

Or at 504 Kearny treet, S. P., room 10. 
CALIFORNIA S IDEAL BIG TREE AND FAVORITE RESORT. 

{Pacific Congress Springs, 

SANTA CRUZ MOUNTAINS, 
SANTA CLARA COUNTY. 

Remodeled and under new management. 

A new swimming tank has just been completed--175x80 ft. 

It takes O hours and Z. dollars to get there. 

JOHN S. MATHESON, Manager. 



ffiubicon Springs, 

On Rubicon River, 10 miles from 

^fcKtnuey's. LAKE TAHOE. 

Primitive, clean tar me cooking. 
New management; new furnishing: 
new stages; tine fishing and boating 
on river and lakes; tbe drive to the 
springs is the most picturesque for- 
est drive in California. These springs 
are noted for medicinal value in stom- 
ach, liver, and kidney troubles, and 
relief for obesity. 

I? to 10 per week 

a ABBOTT, Manager, 




The Discoverer of Rubicon Springs. 



|[ VAII JIRF CF FlflNft f»r a delightful and healthful resort 
7 VU ni\L dL'LlvlliU for !1r- summer months for vour fam- 
ily, not so remote from town but that 
you can be with them without neglecting your business ; 

1 1 yiiu are in search of a good table and comfort utile sleeping aparimeuts 
only an hour and a half's travel from San Francisco with half-hourly com- 
cation, day and evening; 
If it is your wish to confine your summer's outing by a moderate outlay^ 

..„r attention I. directed .0 flflV U/flRDS PflRK, 

At the terminus of the Oakland, San Leandro and Haywards Electric Ry. 
i T if you are fond of tenting here you will find a large number of comniodimis 
platforms arranged convenient to tbe hotel '.lining room, on one of which 
you may erect your tent : 
A choice musical programme is rendered every Sunday afternoon on the 
;i nt the club house. The cars of the company run into the Park. The 

thly commutation rate is only $5; room and board if8 per week; board 

lor campers $5 per week, tampers and roomers have the same service from 
attendants. Address, MRS. DORA SHANE, Haywards Club House. 

If you have any doubt, consult tbe 

California Title Insurance and Trust Co. 

Insurance policies guaranteeing titles to be 
perfect Issued and abstracts made and con- 
tinued. Money to loan on real estate. 
Office-Mills Building. 

.'has. Page, Pres,; Howard E. Wright, Secretary and Manager. 



IS YOUR 

TITLE 

PERFECT? 



July 2, 1898. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



mm 




,5uriMER Resorts 




Jhe St. [lelena 5ar>itarium. 

lis special features unrlniled and not found elsewhere on the coast. 
SCENERY. Located amid groves on the western tlope of Howell Mountain. 
It overlooks the beautiful Napa Valley in its most charming section. 
Premises inolude sixty acres of well-kept lawns, beautiful gardens, and 
extensive groves of pine, live oak. madrona. Charming walks and drives. 
EQUIPMENT. Buildings consist of a main five-story structure, the "New 
Cottage," and ten other well-equipped buildings, including cottages gym- 
nasium, chapel, laboratories, natatorium. besides thirty tents. Well fur- 
nished, steam heaud. electric calls, elevator, complete soient'fic appara- 
tus. Every accompaniment of a well-conducted institution of its kind. 

SERVICE. Three regular physicians, thirty trained nurses, forty assist- 
ants; sumptuous and classified dietaries; skilled operators for application 
of massage. Swedish movements, and all kinds or electric and water 
treatment. Infectious and offensive patients not received, 

Address, ST. HELENA SANITARIUM, St. Helena, Cal. 



fldams Springs. 







LAKE COUNTY. 

Best Water In (he World lor STOM- 
ACH, LIVER, and KIDN:v 
TROUBLES. 

Long Distance Telephone. 
Take Southern Pacific It. R. f 
foot of Market Btreet. Kound 
Trip Tickets, $ 0. 
For further particulars, aiklress 
Dr. W. R. Prather, 1* op. 



^ei^ler Sprigs, 



-LAKE COUNTY, CAL, 

This delightful waterlngiplace is located in the midst of the Coast Range. 

/Iburjdapee of /T\ir;eral Sprites. 

Hot and cold plunge baths, large swimming tank of mineral water, fine 
stone dining room; telephone connections, electric light*, livery a room* 
modation ; good trout fishing and hunting, Round trip tickets at Sou hern 
Pacific offices, $10. 

John Spaulding, Proprietor 

J Wallace Spaulding, Manager. 



/Ipderson Springs. 




Only natural Mineral Steam Baths in 

LAKE COUNTY. 

Hot Sulphui and Iron Baths. 
Board : $8 to $14 per week. Baths Free. / ddress, 
J. Anderson, Anderson Springs, 

Middletown, Lake County, Cal. 
Fare, San Francisco to Springs and return re- 



duced to $8. Send for circular. 

4S-JU11 particulars at "Traveler,' 



) Montgomery St., S. F. 



Jti^Iapd 5P rir ? < ? 8 - 



■LAKE COUNTY, CAL. 



BEST PLACE IN CALIFORNIA FOR HEALTH OR PLEASURE, 

Thirty of the greatest mineral springs in America; all kinds of amuse- 
ments: aew swimming tank, baths and bowling alley. First-class accom- 
modations; rates reasonable; write for illustrated pamphlets. 

San Francisco office, 316 Montgomery street. 
Address, Highland Springs, Cal. 



J-larbip 



J4ot Sulphur aijd 
Tror? Sprii?$s. 



LAKE CO., CAL 




Most accessible and most desirable. 
Stage daily from Callstoga to Springs. Round trip 
tickets at Southern Pacltio Office. 18. Fine hunting 
and fishing. 

Absolutely wonderful waters ; all kinds of skin dis- 
eases cured in marvelously short time; kidney, 
liver, and stomach troubles Immediately relieved; 
rates $10 to $18 per week. Long Dlstanoe telephone. 

Address, J. A Hays, Proprietor, 

Lake County, Cal I 



Jtotel Bepvepue, 



LAKEPORT, CAL. 



LAKEPORT'S LEADING SUMMER RESORT. 

Situated overlooking the shore on Clear Lake, Hotel and grounds 
cover two full blocks; special facilities for accommodating families with 
children; well-furnished cottages for those who desire them; home cook- 
ing, boating, bathing, hunting, and superior fishing; no Chinese employed. 

FRANK & A. M. SCALES, Proprietors. 



QlepbrooK, lake do., cal. 

REM EM BER -If you want to hunt; if you want 
to fish; if you want to recuperate; if you want 
the best of recreation; if you want pure air and 
sunshine; ifyouwantto enjoy an exhilarating 
climate, COME TO GLENBROOK 

O. W. R. Tredway, Prop. Glenbrook Hotel. 




paraiso 



J4ot 



MONTEREY COUNTY, CAL. 



SprilJdS. The Carlsbad of America. 



For health, rest, pleasure, climate, accommodations scenery, flower 
beds oleanliness, table, cotsoda tuband plunge baths, hot sulphur tub and 
swimming tanks, massage treatment, special bath houses for ladies and 
lady attendant, hunting and fishing, child' en's playground, coquet, lawn 
tennis, and dance hall. > or families Paraiso stands unsurpassed in the 
State. Plenty of enjoyment for young and old. Take train at Third and 
Townsend streets, San Franoisco. 9 a. m.. and at Oakland from First and 
Broadway at 9 : 10 a. m. daily for Soledad. Return trip ticket $8, to be pro- 
cured at the Southern Pacific office, 613 Market street, under Grand Hotel. 
Seven miles by stage. Telephone and postoffloe. 

For illustrated pamphlets and special inducements for 1898, address 
R. ROBERTSON, Lessee and Manager. 

i( — ..__._ j r* _— :_.*** picturesquely situate? amidst thepine 
r10U/3rd SDriDOS. forests of Lake County— the Swltzer- 
9 •! » 5 ' land of America- elevation 3300 feet. 

No fog; climate perfect Natural hot 
mineral plunge and tub baths, fine medici- 
nal drinking water. Excellent fishing and 
hunting. Post office and telephone on the 
premises. Rates, $10 and $12 with special 
terms for families Accommodations, 
table and service first-class. Round trip 
from San Franoisco via Napa, Callstoga, 
$10, inoluding fine stage drive. 

For accommodations and further particu- 
lars address 

Mrs. R. J. Bebjby, Prop., Putah P.O. 




Qarlsbad. 



MOST BEAUTIFUL SPOT IN LAKE COUNTY. 




The mineral springs are well known for marvelous cures when every- 
thing else failed, especially in cases of stomach, liver, kidney and bladder 
affections. Good bathing; new hotel; superior accommodations ; $8 to $10 
per week; roads excellent; good trout fishing and deer hunting on prop- 
erty. For particulars write W. R. McGOVERN, Carlsbad, Lake County. 



ij < . » RKbOKT. Pleasantly located in 

nOD6rQ S a Pine forest three thousand five 
I 5 ** hundred feet altitude ; highest 

elevation, lowest price. First-class family table and 
pleasant rooms, seven to eight dollars per week; 
surrounding scenery unsurpassed by any springs In 
the immediate vicinity. Stage daily. Buy ticket 
direct for Hoberg's, Lake County, Cal. 

George Kammerer, 
Mrs. M. Hoberg, 

Proprietors. 



DO[)ai)Za ^>pniJ§S. ground: 5 different mineral and 2 pure water 
springs. We oater to campers only. Fishing 
and hunting ; cottages to rent, $1.50 up per week ; pure water piped to eaoh 
cottage. Hot and Cold Mineral Baths. All necessaries can be purohased 
on the grounds; hammocks, swings, and croquet; summer houses in shady 

groves. R. F. Dockery, M. D. Dockery, Proprietors. Putah P. O. 

" JCenilworth Snn. * J 

A New and Strictly First- Class Hotel. 

Steam heat, electric lights, and running water in every room; billiards, 
croquet, tennis, and shuffle board. Saturday night hops; one hour from 
San Francisco; in beautiful Mill Valley; 'bus to and from trains. 

W. E. VEAZIE, Proprietor, Mill Valley, Marin County, CaL 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




July 2, 1898. 



Criminal proceedings have just been 
Things Done taken against men in Kimberley, S. A., 
In the Night, who are charged with salting a diamond 
mine, at the instance of the Crown Prose- 
cutor. Here a charge of the kind is passed over with a 
laugh at the discomfiture of the "salters." The sole 
crime lies in being found out. So much for the ideas of 
morality at two ends of the world. The charge now lies 
against the Mountain Mines, Limited, an English corpor- 
ation, and they must either clear their skirts of it or bear 
the onus which attaches to a proceeding of the most dis- 
graceful character. If some unprincipled prospector, 
poor in purse as well as character, had committed the 
offense, it might be passed over as a natural co-incidence, 
but the same apology cannot be vouchsafed in the case of 
a company of presumably well : to-do people when the 
charge lies at their doors. The Mountain Mines people 
were desirous of selling their property to some wealthy Ca- 
nadians. The latter send an expert to examine the mines, 
and someone "salts" his samples. There is no hesitancy 
about the statement. The charge is made in writing, and 
the report is now in the hands of the Canadian syndicate, 
containing full particulars. That this is not the first time 
the same treachery has been perpetrated on people in- 
vestigating the merits of this property, will be seen by 
the perusal of the following synopsis of the report re- 
ferred to made by J. H. Tibbits, an engineer of experience 
both here and in South Africa, whose standing is vouched 
for by prominent mining men in all parts of the world: 

"In closing my report, I regret very 
Synopsis of much to say that my experience in in- 
Tibbits' Report, vestigating the Mountain Mines was 
somewhat unfortunate. * * * I 
learned from reliable sources that John Taylor & Son, 
while experting the Mountain Mines in behalf of the Lon- 
don people, had their samples salted. The miner that 
was selected to do the work still resides in Sierra City. 
Under the past experience of John Taylor & Son, I fully 
made up my mind that no such work would be perpetrated 
on me, and in order to protect myself that I would be able 
to render a practical and honest report for all concerned, 
I employed my own assayer at $5 per day. * * * My 
assarer, Hudson, was a graduate from Grass \ T alley, 
under A. Cooper of the latter place, is steady, competent 
and reliable. On Monday, May 30th, 1898, Mr. Hudson 
took charge of the assay office, and was far enough ad- 
vanced in his work to make a fire test on Tuesday morn- 
ing, but on arriving at the office that morning, he, 
Hudson, discovered that five samples, which had been 
pulverized and sieved ready to select an assay to-> 
for the test, had been tampered with. On my arrival at 
the office Mr. Hudson imparted the above information to 
me, and we both weut to work and discovered later on 
that the gold found in the five samples never went through 
our hands, as it was so coarse it never went through 
the sieve that Mr. Hudson used the day previous in pre- 
paring the samples. The five samples salted were out of 
the winze, and reports in my hands denote that by careful 
sampling the winze ore gave $12 per ton. Mr. Hudson 
and I took three of the samples out of the five tampered 
with, and from a panning test gave $250 per ton, which I 
consider very rich ore from a vein three feet wide." Mr. 
Tibbits then goes on to say that George M. Pinney, a 
Mr. Van Slooten, and H. F. Wild were at the mine with 
him, that Pinney refused to allow any men from the Sierra 
Buttes to enter the mine as his assistants. Van Slooten 
suggested that possibly rats had tampered with the 
samples, while Wild admitted with tears in his eyes that 
"there was no question about the samples being salted, 
and that the salting was a bungling job." Are the 
directors of the Mountain Mines, Limited, of London, go- 
ing to permit this charge to pass unchallenged, or will 
they probe the matter to the core and fix the blame 
where it belongs? Unless they do so they can hardly ex- 
pect to maintain much confidence among investors, who 
naturally will look to them for protection under the cir- 
cumstances. 



"Nothmg in Klondike," says the Lon- 
Derv.shes of the don Financial News, "has panned out 
Yearning Sack. so well from the promoter's point of 
view as Mr. William Ogilvie. His lec- 
tures and statements to interviewers have been prospected 
with the utmost diligence, and samples of them have been 
made to do service in place of the detailed report and as- 
says, which usually form the substratum of a mining pros- 
pectus." No one will deny this. The Canadian Govern- 
ment, which has allowed him to be paraded in an official 
capacity, must regret that they did not exact a royalty 
from him, for if ever a man had a right to claim a douceur 
for spieling in any interest, Ogilvie has, and to an extent, 
at that, which should have proved as big a bonanza as any 
claim ever yet thawed out on the now famous El Dorado 
Creek. San Francisco, judging from the financial difficul- 
ties of transportation companies, is exercising its usual 
caution in the matter of emigration north. The exodus 
has been checked, as the enthusiasm waned which sent the 
hungry-eyed horde off on a race for Dawson when the first 
gold came down, scampering over the frozen wastes at 
great expense, in order to be first there and corral 
everything in sight, so as to be ready for the slow coaches 
who preferred to await further developments and fine 
weather. It takes the jingle of twenties on the tombstone 
to awaken the dead in this quarter, and when the hoarded 
gold of a twelve month, held back for effect, comes down 
in a lump, the hungry-eyed will, doubtless, be again in evi- 
dence as before. The vagaries of the money grubber, 
with the eternal cry of the horse leech, "give! give!" are 
never more interesting nor instructive as when the species 
is excited by the propinquity of the yellow metal, more 
especially before the coiner has robbed it of its natural 
allurement. The river is now open, and the Dervishes of 
the Yearning Sack may soon again dance for the edifica- 
tion of those who can afford to look on and laugh at the 
frenzied crew. 

The collapse of Hooley has served 
Thieves' Gold Paid to explain much that has been diffi- 
for Silence. cult to understand regarding the 

silence which a number of prominent 
London financial papers have maintained at a time when 
it was clearly their duty to protect their readers from 
bare-faced robbery. Also, how such schemes as the Great 
Northern Industrial, with its mountain of ore going for a 
song, and a dozen other scandalous affairs, have been 
puffed or hushed up as the case may be. Mr. Hooley was 
ruined by blackmail. One paper got £40,000, and for a 
single article another bled him for £10,000. " These state- 
ments," says the Capitalist, "are most important, and it 
is to be hoped will receive the fullest investigation and ex- 
posure." Mr. Hooley promises to show the public what 
sort of a life is that of a successful company promoter. If 
he does so, he will be a benefactor, more especially if he 
exposes the rascals who have been catering to thieves and 
robbery for years past. 

The " Consolidated Gold Mines of 

Good Money Going California," whatever this repre- 

After Bad. sents, has just been reconstructed 

in London, which means that an- 
other set of unfortunates are to suffer under the wine- 
press. The liabilities are stated at between £7000 and 
C8000, which warrants the inference that the original 
capital has vanished in smoke. An attempt was made 
by some members of the Stock Exchange who held stock 
in the concern to stop any further possibility of loss, but 
the weight was on the other end, and the game was played. 

The old Dickens' Custer mines have been 

Progressive revamped, materializing again under the 

Capitalization, old name, after masquerading to no profit 

as the Idaho Exploring Company. The 
modest capital is £420,000. Probably this is due to carry- 
ing on old losses, in the way of the Magalia Con., which 
Mr. Evans tells us was made to pack £180,000 lost by the 
Golden Feather Company. By this progressive plan there 
is no limit to the possibilities of a company's capitaliza- 
tion, althoigb most people will be inclined to question its 
propriety. 

COMMUNICATION regarding Garden Valley mine 
affairs arrived too late for use this week. Will take 
up next issue. 



July 3. 1898. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



13 




' Hear the Crier"' 'What the devil art thou!' 
'Onethat will Dlar thedevll. sir. with you." 



SAN FRANCISCO is noted for the intelligence of its 
salesgentlemen and salesladies, especially for its sales- 
ladies. These salesladies are generally as haughty as the 
gold-grinding ladies in the Miut who are all noble patricians 
and who all have a pull. But now to the story. There is 
an Englishwoman in town. Quite a swell in her way, be- 
ing the daughter of an Earl and quite Clara Vere de Vere 
in her manners. "Ob." she said, the other day. "I am 
really quite surprised that some intelligent person does 
not get out a pocket dictionary of American phrases and 
sell them on the steamers. They would take you know. 
For instance, now, I have already learned never to say 
blouse, I must say waist. But the funniest thing of all was 
this: a friend of mine went into a shop and asked for a reel 
of cotton. The girl stared and stared and then pityingly 
replied: 'Oh, you mean a spool of thread.' My poor friend 
felt quite crushed don't you know." 

THE alleged million dollar private left, thank Heavens, 
last Wednesday. His life, according to some of his 
entimes, was made a burthen to him by the girl in gasses. 
She hung about him with that charming perseverance 
which is so noble a characteristic of a hen with a lone 
chick. Poor fellow! He could not stir without this win- 
some lass being at his elbow, she was as conspicuous about 
this fellow as the bath-tub bearing female was when the 
first expedition sailed. God bless her sweet and young 
heart. It is only love, a sweet, fresh, pure and innocent 
love, which will make a girl hang about a man and carry 
him rubber bath-tubs — and he is only married. Wife? 
Yes! But where? Bath-tub bearing women are enough 
to break up many a happy home, and send a man to 
Manila. Better death than such solicitude. 

THE much-advertised Astor Battery 
has come and gone. Because they 
were a little different to the ordinary 
soldier, and bad some self-respect for' 
themselves, they were howled and yelled 
at by the proletariat. They had only 
one champion, Mrs. Requa. The story 
tells itself. General Merritt undoubt- 
edly selected that battery to go on 
board his ship because he knew they 
were a well-behaved set of men. But 
there is a disposition on the part of a 
certain class here to deride a man be- 
cause he wishes to have the carriage 
and appurtenances of a real soldier. 
However, the stay of the Astor Battery 
here worked a revolution in the office 
of the yellow journal. The ex-peanut 
butcher sent out a man to the Astor 
camp to find out the name of each man 
and their past occupations. He failed. 
Then there was a row, and the end was, that Thomas Gar- 
rett, who has been city editor for several years, and many 
of the staff, walked out. If the Astor Battery could only 
have removed Andy from off the face of the earth, they 
would have been forgiven any crime they could possibly 
commit. 

ft CERTAIN Dr. P. J. H. Farrell had himself appointed 
Surgeon to the First California Regiment, with rank 
of captain, and put in as a recommendation that he had 
been in the British army. Incidentally, the veracious 
Farrell hinted that he was a surgeon in the English army, 
and had served in India. India is a long way off, thought 
Farrell, and being so far off be gave out that he was the 
nephew of Sir Jim Jams Marmalade Farrell, who too was 
a doctor and was head of all the Indian medical depart- 
ment. Well, Dr. Farrell, having graduated in Kentucky 
from an obscure school, surgeon with the rank of captain, 
has been an officer in the British service ! And he was a 
police officer in Australia ! ! They are not generally called 
police officers. They are "bobbies." Perhaps Farrell 
was called a "larrikin." 





JOSEPH JORDAN is a stout, short, genial young man, 
with an infectious laugh and a repose of manner which 
would do credit to Dickens' famous fat boy. He was walk- 
ing along the waterfront one day, when he saw the Gov- 
ernor McDowell and on it General Merritt. "Ah, ha," 
thought Joseph; "I'll get on board and interview the 
General." Tbe distinguished officer saw Joe step aboard, 
and by his authoritative airs he imagined that Joe had 
been hurled out here from Washington to supersede him. 
Joe familiarly approached him, and giving him an affection- 
ate dig in the ribs, exclaimed : "Ah, General, when's the 
next expedition going to sail ? " The General looked 
severely at him: "Who are you, sir?" stiffly asked the 
soldier. "Why, General, don't you know me? Why. I am 
the Examiner." "Oh, indeed," said the General; don't 
you know, young man, that you are a Spaniard. Sir, you 
are worse than a Spaniard, for you are conveying to the 
Spanish information of these fleets and their armaments. 
Now, what do you think of that ? " "Oh, I don't know," 
said Jordan. " I thought not," replied the General;" "your 
paper shows very plainly that it does not know anything." 

PRIVATE letters are floating up from 
Honolulu telling of gay times there 
where the private was nourished on 
turkey and .pot, and where they watched 
the hula-hula and other innocent games. 
Of course the Californian boys were the 
lions of the day. Maidens hung garlands 
around their necks, and casting their 
dusky arms about their waists, bodily 
carried them off to their homes and 
offered to marry them off-hand. That is 
the modest way our boys write. "We 
were the admired of all." "The rest 
were not in it." Now, there is nothing 
more commendable than self-pride; but 
our boys carry matters a little too far 
when they try to make us believe that 
they were the only one and all on that - 
expedition worth looking at. The curse of California is the 
conceit of our young people, and of which nuisance there 
seems no abatement. 

1WI R. George Dryden is a gentleman who holds a State 
11 position and necessarily Mr. George Dryden is a 
gentleman to whose adamantine cheek the blush mounts 
easily. He has also a keen idea that whenever anything 
is going on he must be strictly in it. That is the way all 
petty State officials have. Monday George was in a tug 
where there was a galaxy of feminine beauty, and prodig- 
ious aggregation of literary talent. George was thinking 
of future promotion, setting his mustache curl upward, 
and while not talking philosophy was helping the ladies. 
One fascinating young creature in blue and white tried to 
mount a towing bit. She failed. "Only have reliance," 
said Georgie, "and you can do it. Reliance is everything." 
And she again made the essay. Snap! went something. 
George thought she had a fire cracker in her dress, and 
then what did the incomprehensible girl do. She sat 
abruptly down. And then the skipper called out: "This 
here excursion is a ladies' excursion. Gentlemen go aft 
and gaze for fifteen minutes seaward." 

IN these days there is no man more sorely tried than 
Captain Howard. Now, the Captain is known to be an 
amiable man. He never growls or scolds, but his temper 
is as placid as the bosom of a sheltered pool. Last Sunday 
the Captain ordered that no woman or man should be' al- 
lowed to enter the Oceauic dock while the troops were 
embarking. The dock was clear, and then it suddenly 
began to fill up with the gentler sex. Captain Howard 
was in a quandary. He soon discovered the cause. The 
women were jumping in through the office window and 
were displaying yards of lingerie, much to tbe delight of 
those who could not get in. Captain Howard is a man of 
action. He promptly locked the women in the office, and 
then told a policeman to make them get out as they came 
in. "Let them tear their petticoats off getting out," 
was his majestic reply when the officer said that the girls, 
poor creatures, did not like to leave by the window route, 
as they were afraid of destroying their clothes. 



M 



SAX FRANCISCO XEWS LETTER. 



July 2, 1898. 



BANKING. 



cueGeaerelBu*kte<l»js 



Bank of British Columbia. U.J U a -:;\£i ":^- SS 

Capital Paid Cp -*M0M«" tonmrm I SOM°* 

BEAD OFFICE. «0 Loauu SrmxST. LO*SO« 

-Vletoris Taamrcr. Xew Westssiaster. Kaasloops. Xsa" 

F - »-: gaaawa 

s^j ■ewsalaw*- 
)eei to Cheek~*Dd Bpeeial Deposits reeeiTed. O m h iJ i I CrosiM granted 
» -i Ihsclaa para :' :•-■■ Ml : MB*""* «£ : ' : J -- ?;. .V 1 ""« 
imudconod lallam il ii hi 11 Draw* direct »t carreat rates 
JS^ltraemAoSSStSS!bem,»ai*woa its Aon. as •»"<»"- „ 

LiniKoi^Nora ud Booth Wsles But; Bcoruro-Bf.tUi Llien 
CcasIeeYr IsSAAro-Baek of Irelsed : Mmc^I^ondoa BsAkof Meteo: 
aSSTiiawci-Lc-dc Buk <X Mexico ud Sowh A— ^O™* "J 
jAJ>A*-CkerteredB»ah of Htt,,M MH — *. a i "gLAggg*if A - M * 
v n zsalabt>— Baak of Asstrslssls sad Cbcsaaeretsl H a afcTeFCaw aea Bj ot 
gSrT^TDiaSiiJ 2ed Tbistdad CWeet btey-OrtaWI^Sr 

Atooo»D»w«ooCitr.Yai.io District, in» i|Mim hoTlat; tea Made 
with the CaevHst teak o: r«avrrr weerebj it U prepared to lame 
diafta aad Letters of Credit on that Baak at above ootst. aad trssssct 
other beaktsc baslaess Termaapoe a pw H cs rt os 



Bank of Galifomia, San Francisco. 



Cart tall 
WILLIAM ALV0BD Presides! ICHAM^ILIBSHOP. Vlee-Pres-i 

ALLEX M. CLAY Secretarr THOMAS BROW>_. £*•"** 

SPsss-rua Smith Ass"t Cashier I L F. Mocisow id As* t Cashier 

OORRESPOXDEXTS. 
Xaw Tou-leun. Laldlaw A Co.: IkeBaakof New Tort. X B A. 
BiLTmoaa-Tbe Xstlosal Tir hse» v Baak. Bowros-Tfee Traaoet Xs- 
Uasel Baak: CHiCACO-niiaots Traat aad Sanaa Baak: Caloa Xatioaal 
Baak. PnusauWA-Failaaelpala XsOoaalBesk. St. Locis-Boet- 
eas's Beak- Viasuu Crrr Ser ,—Ageeej of The Back of Celltorsla 
X. M Rothschild * Soss: Pa 



SB* -1: 
LwawM I 




Bxaxxs- Direct lee der Dtaeoato Gesellschsfi Cbisa, 
J at as aad East Lsdi as— Chartered Baak of India. AaatraUa aad China. 
agwtbaua aad Xrw Zaaia*©— The Ualoa Baak of AaatraUa, Lid., aad 
Baak of Xew Zesls nd 
Lett ers of Credit laaaad aratlable la aU pane of the world. 

The San Francisco National Bank, 

Boatheast Coraer of Plae aad fl s n s ra a r streets. S. F. 
Ja« K Wiuoa Preside*!. E A. Bsrocisss, Yiee-Prestdect 

Lxwu I. Cowcha, Cashier. P. W. Wolte. Asslsiaal Cashier. 

Capita: MM" 

Dracroas: ]u. K. Wilaoa. D. J. Staple*. Wi. Plane Johosoe Geo. 
A. Pope. E A. Brarnere. Ed. 6. Lsheaa Charles C. J ■ H a rm 

Asms: Xew Tork— BAaonr Xatioaal Baak. Cease Xatioaal Baak: 
Bastes— XaUoasl Baak of the Cooaaoeweslih. FkUadettUa— Drexel * 
Co. rkliai.il Oeilleianl XaiJoeel Baak. St. Loals— The Mech**Ucs' 
Baak. Kaases CUT— First Xsttoeel Beak. Townjia niuai Ship ej * 
Co. Pari*— More**, HaQca * Co. 

San Francisco Savinos Union. 

S8 CALirOBSIA SUBSET 

Deposit* Jaa. I, Mte teTZLia 

PsliCpCsp'.isIssdSarpls* USW iir 

E B POND. Presides! W. C B. Ds FBEMEBY. Vle*-Presldeat 

LOTELL WHITE. Cashier. 
Directors: George W Bearer. W. A Mac*. Albert Miller. Robert Wall, 
Geonre C Boarasssa, Daalel E. Msrtls. George Tsahstra, E B. Poed 

1 Ssa Fracciseo sad Oakland Seal Estate, aad Faras aad 

BecetTes Deposits. Cosatrr resalttaaees asu be aude la cheeks pajsble 
■ aaal^aassero Pc-- ■-.:• -.r w«. - F»n kCs^hlaaey Oaten •reoai 
by Eiaties. bat the respoaslbtlltT of this baak riaaaiiain oaly with the 
rec*.p: <: the ■ ::-, 

Mo charge u aside sar pas* book or eatraaee tee 

Oaee Hoars: tLaulp at . aad Satardaj erenlsgs, for receipt of de- 
posits sal;. 4 40 to B o'clock. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 

M Foci Sna*T. nus KA»a»r Mac assies' I s s ri i u i h Bcildiss 

Gurscteed Capital at ajaa s * Paid-Up Cap'.-.s. 11X1090 

JAMES D. PBELAX. Pres'.dest S G MTRPHT. Vlce-Prealdeci. 
GEO A BTOXT Oaat -r JOHX A. HOOPER, Tlce-Prea Ideal. 

C. B HOBSOX, AssUtaat Cashier. 

D. Paelaa. L P. Dreiler. Jots A. Hooper. C. G 
.JaastaMoatt. S. G. Msrehj, Frsak 1. Salllrse, Robert MeElroj 
ID. Orsas- 

Iaterestpasdoa Depoelu. Loaas 00 a pysu i m seeantles. 
Depoalu a«sf be seat bj postal order. Wells. Fargo * Co , or Exchaace 
eaCMy Basks. Whes n p ia t i * s L i uexi ta seed slgostsie 

Swiss American Bank ofi>KAExo.6^ixeriaad,a»d 
Galifomia Mortflaoe & Savinos Bank, *£2£g7? n 

Paldsp Caplui aad ReserTes. aajajMa. 
A geserslssrlscs sad m aaa m i l al baaklBg basiaess trsasscted. later- 
t paid oa sarhsts depo s its. Loses os spprored real estate secarttj. sad 

.- J- C Reed. E Msrtiasel. 
H Brssaer, McD R. Teaable. A. 6. Wlelssd. 
Msrtls. C Mtret.P. Tor -sad!. 

Crocker- Wool wonn National Bank of S. F. 

Oonm Maker MonsosnT, 

An Post Oisasis . 

Pald-C; Ca. 1 „ „ 

WM. H. CROCKER.. . r n Ideal 

W _£"5 B S W £. Vlce-Pr.sWlusl 

GEO. W . BXIXE :A!;.er 

DiaacTOBS— Bearr T Scon E B. Poed. Hj. 1. Crocker, Geo. W Scott 



ICE AMD FIRE. 



WITH ORIGINAL ILI.l-TRA : 

THEY met at the lop of a long flight of marble steps in 
an old, ruiDed foreign garden. When he saw the face 
of the girl a wave of reminiscence swept over him. Surely 
be had seen her before — but no: she was a peasant, and 
bis wanderings in provincial Italv had not been extensive. 
Folds of rough blue homespun fell around her in graceful 
lines. A little square of white linen was pinned on her 
black hair which bung in soft, thick braids to her knees. 
She was brown from the sun's kisses and the wind's mis- 
chief, and ber eyes, dark and liquid, bad a shadow of pain 
in their depths. 

The landscape bad taken on the sombreuess of early 
twilight, and the one bright spot in it seemed the sash of 
scarlet silk around her waist. It was faded and old, and 
hung limply, but lovingly around her. 

'lam looking for the well," he said to her, and bis 
Italian betokened that he was no child of Italy. 

" You are sitting on it, signor.' she answered simply, 
with a suspicion of laughter around ber lips. 

Trembling on the brink,' as it were. May I borrow 
your gourd? I am very thirsty." 

With a pretty motion of hospitality (hospitality is so 
sweet in these southern lands!; she stooped over the side 
of the well and fiiled the cup for him. 

'• Drink, signor. It is always cold, this water. There 
is a legend — " and here she stopped, as if fearing to ap- 
pear bold. 

'Tell it tome, please." he said, eagerly. 

"Centuries ago a rich and handsome signor feU madly in 
love with a fair miladi from the north. For seven years 
he wooed ber. She was always good, always cold: cold as 

e One day be pleaded his passion to her with all the 
warmth of bis nature and our language. He waited for 
her to speak. Her answer meant so much to him. At 
iast she said: 'Will you oblige me with a drink of water 
from the well?' 

"With his heart on fire he drew ber to him suddenly and 
threw her into the w&ll, and since then the water — do you 
not find it colder than ice, sign' 

■'I wish," he said, reflectively. " I had not taken that 
water.'' and then they both laughed. 

He came often to the old well, up the flight of steps of 
whitest moss-grown marble. He hesitated to ask her of 
her past. At intervals came that thrill of recollection. 
He bad seen her before, but where, 
■chert? One thing he bad discovered; 
she was no peasant, although she 
seemed poor and wore gowns of home- 
spun. Her bands were small and 
beautiful and like ivory. 

One day, at the foot of the steps he 
beard some one singing in the garden 
overhead— a beautiful, passionate 
voice, betokening exquisite cultiva- 

•' How much it sounds like Divina 
Gabbori's voice," he thought. 
Gaboon had been setting all Italy on 
fire with ber voice, her beauty and 
her badness the winter previous. "A 
woman men long to seU their souls for' 
some one had said of ber not without 
reason. 

When be came to her with out- 
stretched hands she looked a little dis- 
turbed and shy. 

• • Was that you singing, carissima?" 
•red. 

''I. signor? I do not sing. Perhaps 
it was miladi in the next 1 

Through the sweet summer hcurs, in 
the dewy mornings, the hot yellow 
mons, the cool moon-swept evenings, 
these two dreamt their love dream, 
as the young and lovely have dreamed 
their dreams since the beginning of 
the world. The futility of all things 







July 2. 1898. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




does not impress youth. 

One night they sat on the rose. 
wreathed stone wall together: one 
slow mellow night. The air was full of 
the fragrance of a thousand flowers 
and the nightingale poured out its 
little song in the myrtle trees. Sud- 
denly she spoke: 

" Did you ever hear Gabbori sing? 
They say she is wonderful." 

" Yes, she is wonderful, but her ex- 
cesses and extravagances, her total 
want of womanliness, take away 
for me much of the charm of 
her matchless voice. A pure soul 
should go with such a voice, a soul 
like yours." 

Warm as the night was she shivered. 
" You could not love a woman who 
was not pure, could you?" This 
wistfully. 
" I could never love a woman who degraded her soul; a 
woman who wore Prince Colonna's jewels and sold her 
body for his money. But why talk of these things, little 
one? I love you. Some day when my pictures make me 
famous I shall make you my wife." 
In the moonlight her face was radiant as an angel's. 
" And you, signor. Ah! Sancta Maria, hew I love you I 
Come, let us walk to the old well." 

Hand in hand they came down the path. The moon 
spread a trail of silver glory over the well as they sat on 
its edge. Suddenly a woman appeared with a long snowy 
wrap in her arms. 
The girl on the well's brim turned and saw her. 
"Here is the signorina's wrap. The night is too chill for 
the signorina — it will ruin her voice." 

Frigid and staring with a hard look in her eyes she 
turned to the man. She seemed carved of marble, so 
white and still she stood. 
He rose. 

"Who in Heaven's name are you?" he asked. 
"I love you," she said, softly. 
" Who are you?" 
" I love you," she repeated. 
"Tell me who you are," and his voice shook. 
" I am Divina Gabbori!" 

He took her suddenly by the shoulders and then, lifting 
her up, hurled her into the well. 

"MyGodl My God 1" he said, under his breath, as he 
stumbled down the long flight of marble steps. 

Afterward the well was covered with a stone and sealed 
up. The water was too warm to drink. The people at 
the villa had it brought through a pipe from the village 
brook. 

Some one said the lifeless form at the bottom of the steps 
meant a murder. Others an accident. But the roses 
and the nightingales knew better; the man's heart had 
broken. 

GET the wife and babies out of town and away from the 
bustle and heat of the Fourth by securing half-rate 
tickets over the San Francisco and North Pacific Rail- 
way, to the delightful redwoods or springs in Sonoma 
Countv. Tickets are good until the 5th. 




Smokinq Tobacco ## 



There are many ailments that are peculiar to the warm summer 
weather. Impure food and had digestion are agents of misery and 
friends of the physician. Pure food is a warrant against ill health. 
The specialties at Swain's Bikery, 213 Sutter street, are gluten and 
whole wheaten hread and they are recommended by doctors as the 
most nutritious and wholesome breads made. Swain's delivery 
wagons are prompt and their customers are not only sure of the very 
best cakes, pastries, and breads but of a punctual service as well. 
Try Swains. 

Ins st Upon Having Your Ticket to New York, Boston, or 

Other Eastern Cities 
Read over the Nickel Plate (N. Y. C. & St. L. K. R.), 'he popular 
low-rate short line. Quick time, unexcelled accommodations, and 
no extra fares charged. Jay W. Adams, Pacific Coast Passenger 
Agent, 37 Crocker Building, San Francisco, Cal. 

Jackson's Napa Soda knocks rheumatism. 



BANKIN G. 
The Anglo- Galifornian Bank, Limited. 

Capital authorized 16,000,000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 

Paid Up 1,500,000 

Reserve Fund 700,000 

N. E. Cob. Pine and Sansomb Sts 
TTwAn Office— 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 

Agents at New York— J. & W. Seligman & Co,, 21 Broad street. 

The Bank transacts a General Banking Business, sells drafts, makes 

telegraphic transfers, and issues letters of credit available throughout the 

world. Sends bill* f or collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange 

and bullion. IGN. STEINHART 1 Mftnft „ ftrR 

P. N. LILIENTHAL ; Mana Kers 

The German Savings and Loan Society. 

No. 520 California Street, San Francisco 

Guarantee capital and surplus 92,109,000 99 

Capital actually paid up in cash.. 1,000 000 00 

Deposits December 31, 180V 26,369,633 36 

OFFICERS: President, B.A.Becker; First "Vice-President, Daniel 
Meyer; Second Vice-President, H. Horstman; Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; 
Assistant Cashier, William Herrmann ; Secretary, George Tourny ; Assist- 
ant Secretary, A. H. Muller; Attorney, W. S. Goodfellow. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS : B. A. Becker, Daniel Meyer. H. Horst- 
mann, Ign. Steinhart, N. Van Bergen, E. Rohte, H. B. Russ, D. N. 
Walter and N. Ohlandt. 

Wells Fargo & Go. Bank. 

N. E. Corner Sansomb & Sutter Strbbts 

John J. Valentine President 

Homer S.King Manager 

H. Wadsworth Cashier 

F. L. Lipman ..Assistant Cashier 

Cash Capital and Surplus 16,250,000 

BRANCHES. 

N. Y. City, H. B. Parsons, Cashier. | Salt Lake City, J. E. Dooly, Cashier 

Portland, Or., R. M. Dooly, Cashier. 

Directors— John J. Valentine, Benj. P. Cheney, Oliver Eldrtdge, Henry 

E. Huntington. Homer S. King, George E. Gray, John J. McCook, John 

Bermingham, Dudley Evans. 

London, Paris and American Bank, Limited. 

N.W. Cor. Sahsomi & Sutter Sts. 

Subsorlbea Capital 12,500,000 

Paid Up Capital 12,000,000 

BeserveFund I 850,000 

Head Office , 40 Threadneedle Street, London, E. C. 

AGENTS— New York— Agency of the London, Paris, and American 
Bank Limited, No. 10 Wall Street, N. Y. Paris— Messrs. Lazard, Freres 
& Cie, 17 Boulevard Poissoniere. Draw direct on the prinoipal cities ot the 
world. Commercial and Travelers' Credits issued. 

Securitu Savings Bank. 

222 Montgomery St.. Mills Building, 
interest paid on deposits. 

LOANS MADE. 

DIRECTORS. 
William Alvord S. L. Abbot Jr. H.H.Hewlett 

Wm, Babcock O. D. Baldwin E. J. McCutohen 

Adam Grant W.S.Jones R. H. Pease 

Continental Building & Loan Association of California. 

Established in 1889. 222 Sansome St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Subscribed Capital, $7,000,000 Profit and Reserve Fund, $100,000 

Paid-in Capital - - - 1,000,000 Monthly income, over - - 75,000 

Dr. Ed. E Hill, President. Capt. Oliver Eldridgk, Vice-President. 
Wm. Corbin, Secretary and General Manager. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 2 1898. 



Without a Rival 

POE BILIOUS AND NERVOUS DISORDERS 
such ns 

Weak Stomach 
Impaired Digestion 

Disordered Liver 
Sick Headache, etc. 

IN MEN, WOMEN OR CHILDREN. 
Beecbfl aken as directed, will 

(tore females to 1 iplote 

as they prom] ol istruo- 

torn. 

Beecham's Pills 

Annual Sales over 6,000.000 Boxes. 

25o. nt iill Drug Stores. 



CITY INDEX AND PURCHASER'S GUIDE 

RESTAURANTS. 
Maiton Tortoni, French Rot isscrie, 111 O'Farrell street. Private dining 

rooms and banquet ball. S. Constantlnl, Proprietor. 
Poodle Dog Restaurant, S. £. cor. Grant ave. and Bush at. Private 

dining and banquet rooms, Tel. 429. A. B. Blanco & B. Brdn. 
Bay State Oyster House and Grill Room, 16 Stockton street and 109 
O'Farrell street. N. M. Adlec Proprietor. Telephone Main 5057. 

MEDICAL. 
Dr. Hall, 59 McAllister St . . near Jones . Diseases of women and children . 

POSTAGE STAMP DEALERS. 
Hawaiian Stamps a specialty. MAKINS & CO 506 Market street. 
Selections on approval: any plaoe In world. W. F. ORE ANY, 827 Brannan 
The W. H. Holtls Stamp Co., (Incorporated), 105O'Farrell St.,S. F. 

BOILERMAKERS. 
P. F. Dundon's Ban Francisco Iron Works, 314, 316, and 318 Main street. 
Iron Work of every description designed and constructed . 



Houses Built to 
Suit Purchaser. 



Most Desirable Location in 



Z/jelveciere 



Easy terms on monthly payments. 

Apply, Dr. Byron W. Haines, rooms 16-17, H.Graot avenue, City. 

H. ISAAC cJONtfS, M. D. 

Eye, Ear, Nose, and Throat. 

Office, 222 Post street, between Grant avenue and Stockton Sts., S. P. 

Hours, 10 a. m. to -l p. it. Sunday by appointment. 

Tel. Grant 101. 

DR. BYRON W. HAINES 



14 Grant Avenue 
Rooms 16-17-18-19 



Dentist 



d. D. SULLIUAN 

Mttorney-at- Law 
Rooms 34-38, 3d Floor Chronicle Building, San Francisco. 




In Th Our World, by Cbarlotte Perkins Sletson: published by 
Small, Maynard & Company, Boston, 1898. 
This nicely printed and got-up little volume contains a 
collection of Mrs. Stetson's verses, grouped under the 
headings of The World, Woman, and The March. We like 
best a little poem entitled "Fire with Fire:" this has life, 
vigor, and movement. While Mrs. Stetson's verses show 
some power of expression, they are often very common- 
place; as for example: 

" Of all most aggravating Ihings 

If you are hot in haste. 
Is to have a roan in front of you 
With half a day to waste." 
This is not even good doggerel. As might naturally be 
expected, Mrs. Stetson's notions on woman's suffrage find 
expression in her verses: she tells us that some of the 
Anti-suffragists are: 

" Ignorant women— college-bred sometimes, 
Bat ignorant of life's realities 
And principles of religious government, 

And how the privileges they enjoy 
Were won with blood and tears by those before—" 
And that others are: 

"Selfish women— pigs in petticoats, 

Rich, poor, wise, unwise, top or bot- 
tom round, 

liutallsublimelyinnocentof thought 

And guiltless of ambition, save the 
one 

Deep, voiceless aspiration — to be 
fed!" 

We are utterly unable to sea 
in what respect this differs 
from prose, except in being 
printed with a capital letter at 
the beginning of each line: and, 
even allowing that it is verse, 
it is open to the objection that 
politico-economical contro- 
versy is ill-adapted to poetical 
treatment. If people wish to 
expound sociological doctrine, 
let them employ the natural 
medium of expression— prose. 
It is unnecessary to hamper 
their exposition with the rules 
of verse composition when their 
subject is essentially prosaic. 

Christ in the Daily Meal: or the Or- 
dinance of Breaking Bread; bv 
Norman Fox, D. D.; published by Fords, Howard & Hulbtrt 
New York, and James Clark & Co., London, 1898, 
In March, 1895, Dr. Norman Fox read a paper on 
the Lord's Supper, before the Baptist Ministers' Con- 
ference of New York and vicinity, which was printed 
in The Independent and excited much discuss : on. The 
paper has been expanded by further references, and 
now appears in a neat little volume. Dr. Fox's view 
is that Jesus bade his disciples eat and drink "in remem- 
brance" of him, not oncertain special occasions, but when- 
ever they had a meal; that His words do not enjoin a 
separate meal, but a remembrance of Him at the ordinary 
meal; that nowhere in the New Testament do we find men- 
tion of a supper consisting of a mere morsel of bread and 
a tiny sip of wine, and that the love feasts of the early 
Church were substantial repasts. This view is stated 
clearly, simply, and temperately, without heat or ve- 
hemence, and certainly seems entirely reasonable. Dr. 
I'ox thinks that all devout persons, whether baptized or 
not, who desire to unite in remembering Christ, should be 
invited to the communion table. The everyday meal which 
nourishes the body is to remind the believer of Christ, his 
spiritual food. 

In an article on "American Literary Centres,'' in a re- 
cent issue of Literature, Mr. W. D. Howells writes as 
follows: "We had really no use for an American literary 
centre before the Civil War, for it was only after the Civil 




July 2, 1898. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



17 



War that we really began to have an American literature, 
t'p to that time we had a Colonial literature, a Knicker- 
bocker literature, and a New England literature. But as 
soon as the country began to feel its life in every limb with 
the coming of peace, it began to speak in the varying ac- 
- of all the different sections — North, East, South, 
W.'^t. and Farthest West; but not before that time. Per- 
haps the first note of this national concord, or discord, 
was sounded from California in the voices of Mr. Bret 
Harte. of Mark Twain, of Charles Warren Stoddard, 
and others of the remarkable group of poets and hu- 
morists whom these names must stand for. The San 
Francisco school briefly flourished from 18GT till IST'J or 
so, and while it endured it made San Francisco the first 
national literary centre we ever had, for its writers were 
of every American origin except Californian." These 
statements of Mr. Howells tend to confirm the conclusion 
expressed in these columns last Christmas that, if we ex- 
cept the work of Bret Harte, Mark Twain, and C. W. 
Stoddard, none of whom were Californians by birth, or 
even by residence for long, there is nothing that can 
properly be called Californian literature. Mrs. Atherton 
is not mentioned by Mr. Howells, yet she is a Californian 
by birth and education, and writes much of Californians, 
but then she has ceased to reside here. She may perhaps 
pay a visit to her native State to brush up her local color, 
but that is all she is ever likely to do. Mrs. Atherton's 
position in the literary world of London is far too assured 
and delightful to leave any serious craving for the pleas- 
ures of the Century Club and the Pacific Coast Women's 
Press Association. Even so essentially native a product 
as A. Gunter left us as soon as he grew, or fancied that 
he had grown, to be somebody, and could afford to drive 
fast trotters in Central Park. 
Before the Dawn, a book of Poems, Songs, and Sonnets, by Joseph 

Leiser. Published by The Peter Paul Book Company, Buffalo, 

N. Y. 1893. 

After saying that a volume of poems needs no preface, 
the author at once proceeds to write one, in which he in- 
forms us that "the poems of this volume are selections 
from the literary efforts of the last year in college and the 
first year in a professional career." We presume that the 
object of this remark is to win lenient consideration for the 
"poems" (the author does not ask it for the "Songs and 
Sonnets") on the ground of their being the production of a 
very young man. He goes on to suggest: "the words of 
my poems may be nothing, the drift and latency of them 
everything." As we believe poetry to be thought wedded 
to beautiful words, we fail to perceive how it is possible for 
the words of a poem to be "nothing," and the hidden mean- 
ing (for such we take to be the signification of "latency") 
"everything." We are constitutionally indisposed to 
search for hidden meanings, believing them to be rarely 
worth the trouble. Our notion is that, if a man has ideas, 
he may express them in prose or verse; that, ordinarily 
and for most writers and readers, the former is the easier 
and better mode of expression : yet, if one has the gift of 
graceful and rhythmical expression, he may essay verse. 
But it is impossible that verse in which the words are 
"nothing" should give pleasure to the reader. It is not 
surprising to find in the work of a writer by bis own con- 
fession indifferent to the art of expression such inelegant 
and faulty rimes as "evening" and "leaving," "tears" 
and "wears," "comes" and "homes," "fathers" and 
"hovers," "despondency" and "fancy," "roam" and 
"come," "mentor" and "censor," "worlds" and "whirls," 
and so on. Sometimes Mr. Leiser contents himself with 
making the second and fourth lines rime, leaving the first 
and third unrimed; and occasionally, as in the "Two 
Lovers," he abandons rime altogether, and trusts 
to "drift and latency." 

The Madness of Love, by Leonard Gill ; published by F. Tennyson 

Heely, London and New York. Neely's Popular Library; price, 

in paper covers, 25 cents a volume. 

Tom McHenry sees in a candy-shop on Kearny street a 

charming girl, with whom he scrapes an acquaintance 

some weeks later, as she is paddling in the waves at Ocean 

Beach. He buttons up her boots for her, falls madly in 

love, and, after a short acquaintance, proposes marriage. 

Miss Ocea Holt, as she calls herself, on his promising her 

a hundred thousand dollars on the wedding day, consents. 



To get the money he commits a fraud upon a rich uncle, 
whose property is in his charge. After a week at Mon- 
terey, Ocea clears out, taking the hundred thousand dol- 
lars with her. Later, McHenry learns that her establish- 
ment on California street was kept up by a handsome 
allowance supplied by his own uncle. But despite this 
discovery he is still infatuated, and after a prolonged 
search finds Ocea living with another man, whom he chal- 
lenges to a duel and kills. It is a coarse, vulgar, foolish 
story, poorly written, and in every way worthless. 

"Told in the Rockies, a Pen Picture of the West," by 
A. Maynard Barboar, has been issued by Messrs. Rand, 
McNally & Co., the Chicago publishers. It is well printed, 
and handsomely bound in a parti-colored cloth cover. 

"In the Name of Liberly," by Florence Marryat, has 
been issued in The Globe Library by Messrs. Rand, Mc- 
Nally & Co., the Chicago publishers. Price, in paper 
covers, 25 cents. 

For a cool head — drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The German Savings and Loan Society. 

For the half year ending June 30, 189^, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of four and twenty-hundredths (4.20) per cent per annum on 
Term Deposits, and three and one-half 13 5U) per cent, per annum on Ordi- 
nary Deposits, free of taxes, payable on and after Friday, July 1, 18<»3. 

GEO. TOURNY, Secretary. 

Offlce-526 California street. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Continental Building and Loan Association of California. 
For the year ending with the 30th of June, 1898. a dividend has been de- 
clared of per cent per annum on ordinary deposits, 7per cent on one ye»r 
term deposits, 10 per cert on Class 'F M stock, and 12 per cent to Class "A" 
stock. 

DR. ED. E. HILL. President. 

CAPTAIN OLIVER EL.DRIDQE, Vice-President. 
WM. CORBIN, Secretary. 
Office : 222 Sansome street, San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Savings and Loan Society. 
The Board of Directors declared a dividend for the half year ending 
June 31. 189-1, at the rate of four (4) per cent per annum on Term De- 
posits, and three and one-third (SM) per cent per annum on Ordinary De- 
posits, free of taxes, payable on and after Friday. July 1, 1898. Dividends 
not called for are added to and bear the same rate of d-vldend as the prin- 
ciple from and after July 1, 11:98. 

CYRUS W. CARMANY, Cashier. 
Office: 101 Montgomery street, cor. Sutter, San Franoisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Oceanic Steamship Company. 

Dividend No. 82, Fifty cents per share, of the Oceanic Steamship Com- 
pany, will be payable at the office of the company, 327 Market street, on 
and after Friday, July I, 1898. Transfer boons win close on Saturday, 
June 25, 1898, at 12 o'clook M. E. H. SHELDON, Secretary. 

Office— 327 Market street, San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 

For the half year ending with June 30, 1898, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of three and three. Quarters (33ti) per cent, per annum on all 
deposits, free of taxes, payable on and after Friday, July 1. 1898. 

Office— 33 Post street. San Francisco, Cal. GEO. A. STORY, Cashier. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

San Francisco Savings Union. 

For the half year ending with the 30th of June, 1898. a dividend has 
been declared at the rate per annum of four per cent on term deposits and 
three and one- third f3M) per cent on ordinary deposits, free of taxes and 
payable on and after t riday, July 1. 1898. LOVELL WHITE, Cashier. 

Office: 532 California street, corner Webb, Sun Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Security Savings Bank. 
Dividends for the half year ending June 30, 1 898, on Term Deposits at the 
rate of four (4) per cent per annum, and on Ordinary Deposits at the rate 
of three and one-third (3M) per cent per annum, free of taxes, will be pay- 
able on and after July 1, 1898. 

S L. ABBOT JR.. Secretary. 

Office: 222 Montg mery street, Mills Building. San Francisco 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Parafflne Paint Company. 

Dividend No, 28, 25 cents per share, on the capital stock of the Para- 
fflne Paint Co., will be payable at the office of the company, 116 Battery 
street, on and after Wednesday, June 29, 1898. Transfer books will olose on 
June 24, 1898. R. f. SHA1NWALD, Secretary. 

Office— 116 Battery street, San Francisco, Cal, ^^^ 

DIVIDEND NOTICE, 

Hiberma Savings and Loan Society. 
Office of cne Hibernia Savings and Loan Sooiety, corner Market. McAllis- 
ter, and Jones streets, San Francisco, June 29, 1898. At a regular meeting 
of the Board of Direotors of this Society, held this day, a dividend has been 
declared at the rate of lhree and thre»-flf ihs (3 3-5) per cent, per annum on 
all deposits for the six months ending June 33, 1898, free from all taxes, 
and payable on and after July 1, 1898. 

ROBERT J. TOBIN, Secretary. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




July 2, 1898. 



A PARTY of Produce Exchange men including Jimmie 
Everding, Chester Rosecrans and Charlie Mills, have 
just returned from a coaching trip over the Santa Cruz 
mountains. They made stoppages with sufficient frequency 
to enjoy innumerable ailventures and fished and shot at 
every opportunity. 

In his right hip pocket Charlie Mills carried a huge horse 
pistol and in the course of a day's sliding down the sides of 
precipitous rocks, the pistol wore a great hole in his 
trousers. He promptly transferred the arsenal to his 
other pocket, and soon the left side of his raiment was 
similarly decorated. These unpatched and yawning 
apertures caused no inconvenience to the debonair young 
"bull," who, in the hot weather, rather enjoyed the airy 
costume than otherwise. 

But when they reached the hotel at La Honda for din- 
ner, there was nothing but embarrassment in store for the 
usually natty broker. A number of pretty girls were 
staying at the place, but with two great rents in his 
armor, Charlie felt distinctly out of it. 

However, in the course of the evening, an impromptu 
concert was arranged, and Charlie, who possesses a sweet 
tenor voice, was pressed into service. A charming young 
lady played his accompaniment while he sang "Hard 
Times," which was rapturously encored. 

But when he tried to get out of sight his troubles began. 
All the girls crowded around him to tell him what a sweet 
voice he had, and, in making his escape, without revealing 
his holiness, Charlie was obliged to walk backwards, like a 
crab, all around the room. 

When the adventurers reached Santa Cruz, the condi- 
tion of the Mills garments suggested some of the wilder 
scenery along the Grand Canyon of the Colorado. Then 
Jimmie Everding met some girls he knew who insisted that 
all the jolly adventurers should lunch at their house. Of 
course Charlie said he could not accept, but Everding in- 
sisted and producing a second pair of trousers demanded 
that his friend wear them. 

Unfortunately, Jimmie is a willowy youth, tall and slight, 
while Charlie is exceedingly corpulent. The operation of 
forcing Mills into those trousers was something like put- 
ting a number five glove on a number eight hand, and re- 
quired the combined efforts of the entire party. 

After almost superhuman exertions, they managed to 
button the trousers, while Charlie held his breath. Then 
they went to the luncheon, which was a feast fit for a king, 
and which made ravenous travelers g'.ad they were living. 

But while his companions tucked in, like valiant trench- 
ermen, Mills sat motion!ess, cinched to the last notch, and 
afraid to stir for fear his buttons would fly off with the 
force of bullets. He dared not eat, and hungry though he 
was, he daintily sipped a glass of milk and reluctantly de- 
clined all solids. 

When he finally escaped back to the coach, he made an 
unhappy meal, trouserless, and on cold muffins. 

Then he wired home: 

"Send me eight pair of trousers by express. Pants will 
do." 

# ♦ * 

This week Mr. and Mrs. Chris. Jorgensen took their 
class into the country for a month's stay, and are located 
at Aptos. The class will have every opportunity for en- 
joyment and profit. They are comfortably quartered, aod 
have out-door life with alj the ence of home. Toe 

class will sketch from nature, and tl aeation will 

be made most profitable in an artistic and healthful way. 
The arrangements mailr liy Mr. and Mr ,rn are 

all that could be desired. The country about Aptos is 
ve'-y interesting, and the class will enjoy every p. 
advantage in the pursuit of their art. This is an u: 
departure from the usual vacation methods, and is a great 
improvement over them. 




With the passing away of Robert McMurray, the million- 
aire mine-owner, this State has lost one of her best and 
most progressive citizens. Thoroughly 
broad-gauge, he possessed all the best 
characteristics of the pioneer who 
made bis money in early days, and kept 
it, while spending liberally and living 
generously. 

Never forgetful of those to whom he 
was under obligations for some slight 
service, Mr. McMurray was apprecia- 
tive to a fault. Once, when nominally 
a resident of Nevada County, although 
really living at the Occidental Hotel in 
this city, he was made defendant in a 
suit brought for the sole purpose of 
annoying him. McMurray wished to 
avoid service of some papers and was ^ll\[[ 
desirous that his presence in this city "'[// 
should be unknown to his opponents. 
About that time a San Francisco news- 
paperman had interviewed him on some 
phase of hydraulic mining, but at the 
mine-owner's request, suppressed the 
interview in pursuance of his plan of concealment. 

When the suit had been adjusted out of court, McMurray 
sent the reporter a letter containing a number of en- 
closures. 

"Here are some notes concerning that hydraulic inter- 
view which you are at liberty to publish now," he wrote. 

Each of the "notes" bore the Treasury stamp and there 
were more than a dozen of tbem. 

When the surprised journalist protested that such re- 
muneration had been unearned by him, Mr. McMurray 
curtly bade him "put those notes in your pocket." 

To the day of bis death, the millionaire pushed that re- 
porter into positions, prominent and lucrative, so that for 
years his friends have wondered at the source of his 
mysterious "pull." 

# * # 

The most valued possession of a very nice and good old 
lady, who is by no means poor, is an exceedingly accom- 
plished parrot. The mistress is religious to a degree, and 
has educated the bird in the ways of righteousness. 
The parrot can repeat the Lord's prayer, even 
essays to croak a metallic imitation of "Nearer, 
my God, to Thee," and was just learning the Ten 
Commandments when the old lady fell ill. 

Other occupants of her Jackson-street residence 
are two graceless grandchildren. The grandson 
has always considered that the parrot's education 
was imperfect, and his grandmother's confinement 
to her room gave him the long-desired opportunity. 
He repeated a short sentence to the bird over and 
over, but the parrot gave no sign that it even heard 
him, and finally he gave up in disgust. 

When the dear old lady was able to leave her room, 
the first visit she paid was to the cage of her beloved 
parrot. 

"Well, Polly," she said, fondly, "are you glad to see 
me ? " 

" Go to h 1 ! " promptly responded the parrot, in a 

tone as if she meant it. 

The old lady almost cried with disappointment, but every 
time she comes near the parrot that ungrateful bird now 
screams at her and at her alone : 

"Gotoh 1! Gotoh II" 

The old lady is undecided whether to kill the parrot or 
to disinherit her grandson. 

# # # 

It is entirely probable that Major J. L. Rathbone will 
be soon nominated by President McKinley for a commis- 
sion in the Volunteers. Major Rathbone is at present 
acting as honorary aid to Major General Merriam. He 
is a West Point graduate, and performed very valuable 
service during the war of the rebellion. For a time the 
Major was Consul-General at Paris. When the war with 
Spain came on the Major offered his services, which were 
gladly accepted by General Merriam. Tl e most compli- 
mentary endorsements have been forwarded to Washing- 
ton by Generals Merriam and Merritt, and it is the desire 




July ;, 1898. 



SAX IRANXISCO NEWS LETTER. 



19 



of the latter officer that the Major shall be appointed as 
his representative here during the General's absence at 
Manila. 



A certain member of the Produce Exchange is so illiberal 
that he mav be said to have reduced penuriousness to a 
science. He is an inveterate smoker, and although he al- 
ways has the »pper pockets of his waistcoat lined across 
with a row of cigars, he would rather perish miserably 
thac give one away. At the same time, he has never been 
known to refuse one, but accepts joyfully any old thing in 
the shape of tobacco from a stogie to a perfecto. As soon 
as a cigar comes into his possession, whether bv gift or 
purchase, this Call Board broker lolls his tongue about it, 
and then stores it away in bis pocket. 

" Sorry I can't offer you a cigar," he says, when he en- 
counters an acquaintance, "but, you see, I've had these in 
my mouth," which, bis shuddering friends know, is no mis- 
statement of the facts. 



plaining volubly how it is now a peremptory requirement 
that there shall be a stamp on checks and a stamp on 
draftsand— 

Harry Gray interrupted the exposition with what the 
General considered unnecessary rudeness. 

"If there were a stamp on Hammond now," he said, 
musingly, touching his lips, significantly. "It might check 
that draft." 

IF you want a few days' fishing, or a rest in the most de- 
lightful region in California, take a half-rate ticket over 
the San Francisco and North Pacific Railway to any 
point on its line, good until July 5tb. 



No one questioned the truth of his 
statement when he vehemently as- 
serted that he was a member of the 
As'x>r Battery, as he presented him- 
self at the University Club. There 
were some, however, who were not so 
credulous, when he added that he had 
a card to the club, but that he had left 
the card in his tent. 

It was not so much his condition. 
They could stand that, even at the 
University Club. The real rock upon 
which they split was the "lady" whom 
the gallant artilleryman desired to 
entertain in the ladies' grill. 

They explained to him, as gently as 
possible, that "it didn't go," hintiDg 
ihat even a member of the Astor 
Battery might, on occasions, be 
prmna non grata. Then to break the 
force of the blow, they brought him a 
drink. Somewhat mollified he ac- 
cepted the proffered beverage, took 
a sip, — and promptly spat the liquor 
on the velvet carpet. 

"What's that?" he demanded, hold- 
ing up the glass. 

"Whiskey," courteously explain his 
hosts. 

"Whiskey be d— d!" fervently ex- 
claimed the'artilleryman. as he dashed 
the slass disdainfully on the floor. 

"Whiskey be damned. I want wine." 

* * * 

United States District Judge de 
Haven has a herculean humor. He 
also has a new courtroom steno- 
grapher and not infrequently these 
two possessions get mixed up. 

Attorney Tom Koegh appeared, 
the other day, in connection with some 
matter before the District Court, and 
in reading over his transcript, when- 
ever the name Koegh should appear, 
the stenographer read it Keyhole. 
The unhappy lawyer sat listening in 
disgusted silence, visibly shuddering 
at every fresh repetition of the 
travesty upon his name. Finally, 
after the sixth offence, Judge de 
Haven came to his rescue, having ob- 
served Koegh's growing restlessness. 

"You had better watch out, my 
son," he remarked paternally, to the 
stenographer. "They say worms 
sometimes turn. If Koegh turns 
through that Keyhole of yours, you 

might get locked up!" 

* * * 

They were discussing the war tax 
and General Dick Hammond was ex- 



Moopo's Poison Oak Remedy. 
Cures poison oak and all skin diseases. Sold by all druggists. 

Wedding and Birthday Presents. Magnificent assortment to 
select from at the art store of S. & G. Gump, 113 Geary street. 

Dougherty's Shorthand-Typewriting School. Day and evening classes. 
*fl per month. Typewriting neatly done, reasonable. Supreme Court Build- 
Ing. Larkin street, opposite City Hall. 



NEVER HAS ANYTHING BEEN SO HIGHLY AND SO JUSTLY PRAISED AS 






MARIANI WINE, the FAMOUS TONIC for BODY, NERVES and BRAIN. 

QEN. SIR EVELYN WOOD Says: MARIANI WINE is invaluable at 

this season of the year, when, owing 
to trying climatic conditions, the 
system is especially susceptible to 
attacks of debility and prostration. 

VINHARIANI fHARIANI WINE) 
has stood the test of thirty-five 
years' trial. It has written endorse- 
ments from more than 8000 Ameri- 
can physicians, in addition to hav- 
ing received cordial recommenda- 
tions from royalty, princes of the 
Church and of the State, and many 
notable personages. 



MARIANI WINE is a tonic pre- 
pared upon careful scientific prin- 
ciples. It contains absolutely no in- 
jurious properties. It gives power 
to the brain, strength to the entire 
nervous system, firmness and elas- 
ticity to the muscles, and richness 
to the blood. It has been aptly de- 
scribed as a promoter of good health 
and longevity. 

MARIANI WINE is specially indi- 
cated for General Debility. Weakness 
from whatever causes, Overwork, 
Profound Depression and Exhaus- 
tion, Throat and Lung Diseases, 
Consumption, Halaria and La Grippe. 




" Regarding the infantry marching in the recent ma- 
noeuvres, it was the best seen during my command at 
Aldershot. Many officers availed themselves of the 
tonic and reconstituent properties of the we'l-known 
Mariani Wine, the most certain as well as the most 
palatable method of inducing resistance to fatigue. 
From " The London Sketch." 
HAX O'RELL, 
1 he Renowned Writer and Lecturer, V 




lYour Vin Mariani is positively marvellous : one glass 
put me on mv teet : one bottle made a new man of me. 
Yours gratefully, MAX O'RELL. 

ALL DRUGGISTS. 
Paris: 41 Boulevard Haussman. London: 83 Mortimer St, 



MARIANI WINE Is an adjuvant in 
convalescence and a powerful reju- 
venator. For Overworked Men, Del- 
icate Women, Sickly Children it 
works wonders. Taken with (racked 
ice, it relieves Summer Prostration 
quickly and effectually. It southes, 
strengthens and sustains the sys- 
tem. 



To those who will kindly write to 
MARIANI & CO., 52 West 15th Street, 
New York City, will be sent free, book 
containing portraits with endorsements 
of Emperors, Empress, Princes, Cardi- 
nals, Archbishops and other interest- 
ing matter. 

AVOID SUBSTITUTIONS. 
Montreal: 28-30 Hospital St 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




THE Military continues to 
rule the town. Theatre 
parties are again in evi- 
dence this week, the mili- 
v tary drama of Fort Fruyue 
at the Columbia being the 
-"* attraction which has 
brought out the largest number of them, especially on 
Monday evening, when Geueral King, as author, received 
an ovation. It was quite a society gathering which on 
Tuesday assembled on the Pacific Mail dock to see the 
Astor Battery, and Batteries H and K of the U. S. Third 
Artillery embark on the Newport, and on Tuesday evening 
the Pavilion was crowded to witness the excellent pro- 
gramme provided by the Fifty-first Iowa Regiment at 
the reception given them by the Native Daughters of San 
Francisco. 

Dinners have been plentiful since the month of June 
opened; nearly every one has had some friend, either 
among the regulars or volunteers, whom they wished to 
honor prior to their departure for the seat of war in the 
Philippines, and hence that form of entertainment has 
been deemed the best for the purpose. At the Bohemian 
Club General H. G. Otis's friends gave him a banquet last 
week, at which the large party of guests was a mingling 
of civilians and the "milingtary gents" then in San Fran- 
cisco; the decorations were handsome, the menu elabor- 
ate, and the songs and speeches which followed the more 
serious business of the affair were well worth listening to. 
Among other dinner givers were Mrs. Holbrook Blinn; 
Mrs. Charles Pierce, of Oakland, whose guests of honor 
were Col. and Mrs. Ames, and J. J. Ames of the Minne- 
sotas; on Tuesday evening General Wesley Merritt and 
staff, who sailed for Manila on Wednesday, were given a 
diner d' adieu by Major J. L. Rathbone; and members of 
the Astor Battery were muchly dined both in town and 
out of town during their brief stay in San Francisco. 

There have of lale been a l.r e e 
number of Army and Navy wed- 
dings in the different regiments 
and ships en route to Manila, some 
of the brides coming from the 
far East to be spliced to the men 
of their choice before they de- 
parted on their trip which they 
hope will lead to glory. One of 
this week was solemnized at the 
residence of the Rev. W. H. More- 
land, on Washington street, on 
Tuesday evening last, when Miss 
Margery Cook of Chicago was the 
bride, and the groom Ensign Gilm, 
Q. S. X., who arrived on his ship, 
the Bennington, from Honolulu on 
Monday. 

On Tuesday at noon the wedding of Miss Birdie Nathan 
and Arthur Lachman took place at the home of the bride 
on Van Ness avenue. The ceremony was performed by 
the Rev. Jacob Nieto in a bridal bower of white roses and 
fern leaves erected in the drawing-room, where were 
assembled a large number of relatives and friends of the 
bride and groom; Miss Lillian Nathan was her sister's 
maid-of-bonor, and Leon Solomon officiated as the groom's 
best man. A bridal cUjemer followed the ceremony, and 
later in the day Mr. and Mrs. Lacbman departed on their 
honeymoon trip down South. 

The wedding of Miss Lizetta Popp and W. E. Broder- 
son will take place at the Lutheran Church on Gearv 
street next Tuesday evening. Recent engagement an- 
nouncements include those of Miss Florence Howard, of 
Berkeley, to A. E. Pierce of the Army Hospital Corps, 
now «n r.mi, to the Philippines; Miss Bertha Crouch and 
A. B. Van Camp of New York; Miss Frances M. Bestman 
and Cbas. C. Hawley. 





I 



Cali- 



Every one who can always gets 
away from the noise and racket 
of the city on the national holi- 
day, and though this year the 
number is smaller than usual, still the crowd depart- 
ing is a goodly sized one. The Hotel Rafael is the 
most popular hostelry sought, for besides the mauy 
comforts of the house itself, and its easiness of access 
from town, the annual tennis tournament will be 
played, and the annual tennis dance, which is 
given as a wind up. is always regarded as one of thr 
events of the season. Among those who will be 
there are Mr. and Mrs. Sam Buck bee, Miss Sallie 
Maynard, Miss Edith McBean, Miss May Hoffman 
and others. 

There will be a big crowd at delightful Del Monte 
on the Fourth; the regular habitues of the place 
are putting in an appearance daily, and by to-mor- 
row there will not be much spare room in that big 
caravansary. Viscount and Viscountess D'Audigne, 
of Paris, have been among the guests there this 
week, Mme. D'Audigne having been summoned to 
fornia owing to the serious illness of her brother, James 
V. Coleman. Herman Oelrichs, the F. F. Ryers, F. W. 
Zeiles, E. J. Prestons, Horace Hills, C. A. Latons, Austin 
Tubbs, Clinton Wordens, Mrs. A. N. Towne, and Mrs. de 
Santa Marina are a few of those who have arrived during 
the week \w spend the summer. 

Paper chase number two came off at San Rafael last 
Saturday. Louis Hughes again filled the role of hare, and 
the h^nds, including Ed Greenway, the two Barons Von 
Schroeder Ahen- Folger and others, had a lively ride in 
pursuit, Pete Finnegan Jr. winning first prize. It is ex- 
pected that the tnird of the series, which takes place to- 
day, w :l be well worth seeing, and as the finish is an- 
nounced to occur in the Smith grounds, where Mrs. Fred 
Green's garden party, for the benefit of the Children's 
Hospital, will then be in full swing, it will no doubt be an 
additional reason (if one were needed) for the Uau.c monde 
of the villa ae to attend. Donald deV. Graham will give 
his annual song recital in San Rafael this evening at the 
G rand Opera House, and it is a foregone conclusion that 
all the world and his wife thereabout will be present. 

John Dolbeer and Miss Dolbeer have returned from a 
year's absence abroad, and have taken apartments at the 
Palace. 

E. A. Wiltsee will take a party of stags 
on his yacht to Santa Cruz for the Fourth, 
where are already several yachts of 
the Pacific Club; the I. W. Hellmans will 
spend it at Lake Tahoe. The war hav- 
ing prevented the anticipated European 
trip of the P. N. Lilienthals, they are 
spending the summer away up at High- 
land Springs; Mr. and Mrs. Tim Hopkins 
are at the Summit Soda Springs; Mrs. 
Leland Stanford, Mrs. Margaret Irvine, 
J. W., and Callingham Byrne are at 
Castle Crags; Miss Bessie Bowie and the 
Misses Friedlander have forsaken the 
beaten paths of fashion this year and are 
spending the summer at Seattle. 

Mrs. Adam Grant returned by the 
steamer Coptic from 3 delightful trip to 
Japan, and as soon as rested will go to 
Del Monte for the season; Mr. and Mrs. 
J. J. Valentine were also passengers by 
the same steamer from a visit to the 
Orient, and are at their home in Oak- 
land. Aft^r many false alarms the Fred 
Sharons are here at last from a protracted residence in 
Paris, and are at the Palace Hotel for the present; the 
R. P. Schwerins are at San Mateo, where they usually pass 
the summer; Miss Jennie Blair has been visiting Mrs. Sam 
Knight at Menlo Park; Mrs. J. D. Fry is confined to her 
residence on Jackson street by an attack of whooping 
cough. 

City Physician Dr. William S. Hereford and h : s wife, who 
have been living at the Palace Hotel, have removed and 
established their residence at 1115 Sutter street. 



SfiSr?-. 




July 2, 1898. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



To tbe great regret of the San Rafaelites the W. I. 
Kips have decided upon going to Blue Lakes for tbe sum- 
mer, in place of spending it at the Hotel Rafael, where 
the younir ladies were such favorites last year. Mr. and 
Mrs E. G. Schmieden are at San Rafael; Mrs. Webster 
Jones at Cizadero; tbe Sam Knights at Menlo Park; the 
Mayo N.nvhalls are at Laurel Dell for the season; Miss 
Relen Wagner is one of the belles at Blythedale; Mr. and 
Mrs. Henry L. Dodge are at Paso Robles for the months 
of June and July. There has been a large party of San 
Franciscans at Howell Mountain, including Mrs. and Miss 
Lux, Mr. and Mrs. Sig. Greenebaum and family, Mrs. L. S. 
Bachman and family, Mr. and Mrs. E. G. Schonwasser 
and family, and W. Scott Keyes. 

That the fame of the California Hotel must be wide- 
spread as a most excellent place of resort for the travel- 
ing public, it is only necessary to glance at the names of 
a few of those whose headquarters it has been during the 
past week: G. T. Meyers, Jr., of Portland; E. D. Barlow, 
of New York; Mr. and Mrs. John Ena and family, of 
Honolulu; Dr. F. H. Gates, of China; Major Charles 
Thorpe, of Minneapolis; T. L. Geist, of Munich; Professor 
O. P. Jenkins, of Palo Alto; M. A. Gibbon, of Arizona; 
Lieutenant Camden of the Corwin, and Lieutenant Cutter, 
of the Rush; and Mr. and Mrs. James Robinson, who have 
just returned from their European tour. 

Mrs. Frank Hamilton Nowell, child, and nurse, left for 
Juneau on the 15th inst. on the steamer Cottage City. 
They will visit all the interesting points in Alaska, and 
will be gone three months. Tbey are the guests of Mr. 
and Mrs. F. D. Nowell. 

The ladies of the Red Cross Society were particularly 
active just before the sailing of the transports, and tbe 
soldiers had renewed occasion to be grateful for the bounti- 
ful lunches that were provided for them. The coffee for 
the thousands of departing men was supplied by Max 
Abraham. 

The marriage of Miss Agnes Jane Duhrind and C. T. 
Ryland was solemnized last Wednesday at Pine Lodge, 
Sonoma County, and a wedding breakfast was served at 
midday by Max Abraham, caterer. 

THE people of Eureka are to be congratulated upon 
having secured for orator on Independence Day Hon. 
S. M. Shortridge. As a speaker, Mr. Shortridge has 
fairly earned a distinguished place. The stirring events 
of the time aff ird additional opportunity for flights of elo 
qience, and tbe people of Eureka may prepare them- 
selves for an oration worthy of themselves, the distin- 
guished attorney, and the glorious Fourth. 

THE man who buys high-grade goods in original pack- 
ages may always feel assured of one thing, and that 
is that the article he purchases is pure. Adulterations 
are everywhere and in almost everything we consume; but 
tie goods one buys from Chas. Meinecke & Co. are abso- 
lutely pure. The firm's well-known reputation is a guar- 
antee that every article sold by them is exactly what it is 
represented to be. 

THE northern part of the State is noted for its natural 
beauty. The San Francisco and North Pacific Rail- 
way offers half-fare transportation from June 30th to July 
5th, over the most beautiful scenic route in the State. 



He — Yesterday I exchanged thoughts with the famous 
Prof. Saduka. She— That explains it. I found him very 
tiresome. — Fliegende Blaetter. 

The greatest musical hit of the season is "Dewey '% Victory March" 
by Lee Johnson. The Park Band has played it for the past three 
Sundays, and by popular request has put it on for next Sunday. All 
the music stores have it. 



New line of picture frames, in metal, gold, and old oak, green 
vjry, and Japanese gray ; also elegant line of picture mouldings. 
John F. Kennedy, Art Dealer, 19 and 21 Post street. 

Allen's Press Clipping Bureau, 610 Montgomery street, S. F., deals 
In all kinds of newspaper Information, business, personal, political, from 
p -ess of State, Coast, and Country. Tel. Main 1042 . 

Mothers, be sure and use " Mrs. Winslow's Soothing Syrup " for your 
ebildien while teething. 

Indigestion dies where Jackson's Napa Soda lives. 



SUNBEAMS. 



Sua — Why, she flirted outrageously with him all winter. 
Nell — Yes. I saw him kiss her one night. Jfnnik— Oh, 
that is not flirting. Sue and Nell — Not flirting? Then 
we would like to know what is. Jennie — Why, making 
him want to and not letting him. — Life. 

She had just been stating her reasons for refusing his 
hand. "I hope," she said, "that I have made myself 
plain." "No, I cannot say that you have," he replied. 
"I — I think nature had something to do with it."— Phila- 
delphia Bulletin. 

First Tramp — Dis tract de ole lady gevme is quite, affect- 
in'. It's about a man what drank heavily fer 20 years, 
an' what do yer t'ink happened to him? Second Tramp — 
What? "He took de pledge an' never tasted liquor again." 

Rev. Mr. Lently — I noticed, my son, that you didn't seem 
to understand it when I said grace. Doesn't your father 
always bless the food? Bobbie — No, sir. He generally 
swears at it. — Brooklyn Life. 

He — Then you think kissing is not wrong? She — The 
idea! Why, I wouldn't be seen doing such a thingl — Cin- 
cinnati Enquirer. 

Some of the finest satsuma, carved ivory, lacqher. and other 
artistic Japanese work ever brought to the city may be seen at Geo. 
T. Marsh & Co.'s, 625 Market street, under the Palace hotel. A 
visit to that store is a liberal education in Japanese art. 

All sensible people drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 

claimed 
Tor years 
buggy manu- 
facturers have secured exorbitant prices for their goods, but recently, 
through the combined assistance of the farmers of Iowa, Illinois, and 
other Stales. Sears, Roebuck & Co., of Chicago, have got the price of 
open buggies down to $16.50; Top Buggies. $22.75; Top Surries, $43.75 and 
upwards, and they are shipping them in immense numbers direct to farm- 
ers in every State. They send an immense buggy Catalogue free, postpaid, 
to any one who asks for it. This certainly is a big victory for the fanner, 
but a severe blow to the carriage manufacturers and dealers. 

IRVING INSTITUTE f£%T& Haa °* 7 sciml 

2126 California St., S. F — 

Accredited to the Universities. Seminary and full Conservatory of 
Music Primary department for children. A carriage will call. 
For further information address the principal, 

Rev. Edward B. Church, A. 1*1. 



Farmers Break tbe Bugou Monopolu £M 



A boarding and day school for boys 
and young men. 



TRINITY SCHOOL. 

Christmas: Session Opens First Monday in August. 
An accredited school with the University or California and the Ice- 
land Stanford Jr. University. A corps of eleven teachers. 

Rev. Dr. Spalding. Rector, 

3300 Washington street, S. F. 

HR. and MRS. DICKINSON'S 



ACADEMY, 



1247 Franklin St., Near Post, S. F. 



Reopens August 1, I898. 

English, French, German, and Spanish Boarding and Day school. 
Begins with kindergarten, and prepares for universities, business, 
and society. Drawing and painting. 
Cultured home training. Excellent table. $30 per month. 
Music in all its branches if desired, extra. 

PVR. T. FELIX GOURAUD'S ORIENTAL 
I - ' CREAM, OR MAGICAL BEAUTIFIER. 



Removes Tan, Pimples, Freckles, Moth 
Patches, Rash, and Skin Diseases, and 
every blemish on beauty, and defies de- 
tection. It has stood the test of 48 years 
and is so harmless we taste it to be sure 
it is properly made. Accept no counter- 
feit of similar name. Dr. L. A Sayre 
said to a lady of the haut-ton (a pa- 
tient) : "As you ladies will use them, I 
recommend ' Gouraud's Cream ' as the 
least harmful of all the Skin prepara- 
tions.' 1 For sale by all firuggists and 
Fancy-goods Dealers in the United 
States, Canadas, and Europe. 

FERD. T. HOPKINS, Prop'r. 

37 Great Jones St., N. Y. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 2, 1898. 



IN SURANCE 

JG. CONRAD, of Voss, Conrad & Co., has returned 
, from a visit to New York City. 

Assistant Manager Hall, of the Thuringia, is making a 
tour of the Northwest. 

Ed. Niles, special agent of the North British and Mer- 
cantile, has gone to Utah. 

The Frankfort American is the name of a new company 
being organized in New York to do an accident, plate 
glass and employers' liability business. The San Fran- 
cisco firm of Voss, Conrad & Co. will be United States 
managers. 

Wm. Bell, United States manager of the Palatine In- 
surance Company of Eogland, died this month. 

It is denied that the stock of the German fire of Peoria, 
111., is for sale. 

San Diego has a new Mutual Fire Insurance Company, 
making seven in this State organized and doing business 
under the provisions of the law enacted by the last legis- 
lature governing county mutuals. 

The J. S. Maxwell Co. has been incorporated in this city, 
to do a general fire insurance business. 

The New York Life has subscribed for $10,000,000 of the 
new war loan bonds. 

The war tax on fire and life insurance policies went into 
effect yesterday. Hereafter all policies require to bear 
the tax stamp. 

Wm. N. Kremer has been elected President of the Ger- 
man-American Fire, vice E. L. Allen, deceased, and Chas. 
G. Smith i« advanced to the Secretaryship. 

The death of Chester Coulter, a bright young man em- 
ployed as chief clerk in the Preferred office under Man- 
ager Godwin, died on the 16th, of consumption. 

F. C. Calkins takes the Southern field as special agent 
of the Northern Assurance Company. 

James Mur.sell Jr. has moved the office of the Mutual 
Bsnefit Life Insurance Company of Newark into the new 
Clunie building. 

Vice-President Snow of the Home Fire left for the 
Northwest Wednesday, after a visit of two months in this 
city. The Home will hereafter report all business direct 
to the New York office. 

The Thuringia-American Insurance Company, with 
$200,000 capital and $100,000 surplus, has beeu organized 
in New York. 

The New York Life has issued an excellent war map, 
pocket edition, for distribution among the friends of the 
company. 

Clarence M. Smith, of the Northwestern Mutual, is in 
Wisconsin. He will be absent about six weeks. 

The Germania Fire takes $100,1100, the Continental Fire 
$500,(100, and the Prudential Life $1,000,000 of the new 
war bonds. 

Desertions from the Western Union continue with 
alarming frequency. 

Thomas Conroy has been appointed assistant manager 
of the American, Caledonian and Manchester, under L. B. 
Edwards, the Pacific Coast manager. 

William J. Dawson, Secretary of the agency department 
of the Pennsylvania Fire Insurance Company, who has 
been looking over the Coast agency, T. E. Pope, manager, 
has gone home well satisfied with the situation. 

ftLL old Californians regret the death of Thos. Lough- 
ran, the well-known pioneer commission merchant of 
this city. Mr. Loughran was a most upright man, fair in 
his dealings and faithful in bis friendships. By attention to 
business he built up a large trade, and enjoyed the con- 
fidence of the entire community. He was agent for many 
years for a number of the best Eastern staples, among 
others being worthy of special mention the Whitaker 
hams. The business his energy built up will be continued 
at the old store by his widow, Mrs. LoughraD, under the 
management of his son. 

THE San Francisco and North Pacific Railway has made 
a special rate on its delighifully picturesque line from 
June HOth to July 5th to any poiut on the route. A fine 
chance for an outing. 

Jackson's Napa Soda Lemonade is a luxury— try it 





tM » Ml •AMSOMf IT _ 

Capital Subscribed $4 462 750 

LONDON ASSURANCE, capital Paid u P 2,241,37s 

Assets 19,195.145 

Capital Subscribed $5,000,000 

OCEAN MARINE. Capital Paid Up 600,000 

Assets..- 2,502,050 

INSURANCE. 

FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

Firemans Fund 

INSURANCE COMPANY, OP SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Capital, $1,000,000. Assets, $3,500,000. 



PALATINE 



INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited), OF MANCHESTER, ENGLAND. 

SOLID SECURITY. OVER $9,000,000.00 RESOURCES 

CHAS. A. LATON, Manager 489 California St., S. F. 

FIBI IKSCRANCB. 

CONNECTICUT FIRE INSURANCE CO. OF HARTFORD. 

Capital Paid Up 11,000.000 

Assets 8,800,018 

Surplus to Policy Holders 1 .668,882 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager. 

Pill IN M RflVn San Francisco Agent. 

UULI11 HI. DIM U. N. W. Cor. Sacramento and Montgomery Sts., S. F. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INSURANCE CO., LIMITED, 

OF LIVERPOOL. 
Capital 16.700.001 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., Agents. 

No. 816 California St.. S F 

Founded A. D. 1792 

Insurance Company o! Nortn America 

OF PHILADELPHIA, PINK. 

Paid up Capital 18.000.000 

Surplus to Policy Holders 6.022. Die 

JAMES D BAILEY, General Agent. 412 California St.. S T 

ROYAL EXCHANGE ASSURANCE, OF LONDON. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, A. D. 1726. 

Capital Paid Up 13,446,100. Assets, t2l.684.418. 

Surplus to Policy Holders. 18,980.251. 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager. FRANK W. DICKSON, Ass't Manager 

601-503 Montgomery St., corner Sacramento. 

PHOENIX ASSURANCE CO. OF LONDON ««*"*- "«= 
PROVIDENCE-WASHINGTON INSURANCE CO. '-«>rpor...d ,7., 

BUTLER & HALDAN, Oeneral Agents. 

418 California St., S • 

THE THURINGIA INSURANCE COMPANY. 

Of ERFURT, GEltMANY. 
Capital. 12,250,000 Assets. 810.984.248. 
PaclBo Coast Department: 204-208 SANSOME ST., S. F. 

VOSS. CONRAD & CO., Oeneral managers. 



July 2, 1898. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



23 








THE BLOODLESS SPORTSMEN -from whiffs from wild meadows- 

" Hast thou named all the birds without a gun? 

I the wood-roee and left it on its stalk? "—Kwrton. 

I :i -gunning, but take no gun : 

I Aab without a pole; 
And 1 bag good game and catch such tish 

As suit a sportsman's soul; 
For the choicest game that the forest holds, 

And the best fish of the brook, 
Are never brought down by a rifle shot 
And are never caught with a hook. 

I bob for fish by the forest brook, 

I hunt for game in the trees. 
For bigger birds than wing the air 

Or fish that swim the seas. 
A rodless Walton of the brooks 

A bloodless sportsman, I— 
I hnnt for the thoughts that throng the woods,' 

The dreams that haunt the sky. 

The woods were made for the hunters of dreams, 

The brooks for the fishers of song ; 
To the hunters who hunt for the gunless game 

The streams and the wnods belong. 
There are thoughts that moan from the soul of the pine, 

And thoughts in a flower bell curled ; 
And the thoughts that are blown with the sent of the fern 

Are as new and as old as the world. 

So, away ! for the hunt in the fern-scented wood 

Till the going down of the sun; 
There is plenty of game still left in the woods 

For the hunter who has no gun. 
So, away! for the fi>h by the moss-bordered brook 

That flows through the velvety sod; 
There are plenty offish still left in the streams 

For the angler who has no rod. 



WAITING.— john burroughs. 
Serene I fold my hands and wait, 

Nor care for wind, nor tide, nor sea ; 
I rave no more 'gainst time or fate, 

For, lo ! my own shall come to me. 
1 stay my haste, I make delays, 

For what avails this eager pace; 
1 stand amid the eternal ways, 

And what is mine shall know my face. 
Asleep, awake, by night or day 

The friends I seek are seeking me; 
No wind can drive my bark astray. 

Nor change the tide of destiny. 
What matter if I stand alone? 

I wait with joy the coming years; 
My heart shall reap where it has sown, 

And garner up its fruit of tears. 

The waters know their own and draw 

The brook that springs in yonder heights; 
So flows the good with equal law 

Unto the soul of pure delights. 
The stars come nightly to Ihe sky, 

The tidal wave unto the sea; 
Nor time, nor space, nor deep, nor high, 

Can keep my own away from me. 




AT THE POINT OF DEATH —lloyd mifflin, in at the gates of song. 

Come nearer, my beloved, it is night; 

Bend down above my bed thy features mild, 

1 who have neither wife nor teuder child. 

Thou wert mine angel. Wilt thou take thy flight— 
Thon ! with thine eyes of pity infinite — 

And leave me dying and unreconciled? 

It was the sweetness of thy lips beguiled 

Life of its pang and made the darkness bright. 
Oh ! lean down nearer — nearer ! Do not fly ! 

Have we not loved each other well and long? 

Leave me not now, my heart I— my soul!— my song!— 
Beloved Poesy 1 to thee I cry. . . . 

Wrap thy dear arms around me— hold me strong I 

Oh! wake me with thy kisses when I die! 



ourth comes but onoe a year. Why not get 
way fn.m the city until next Tuesday ? 'There will 
be no business done, and the San FranclflCO and North 
Pacific Railway will sell you a round-trip ticket for a sin- 
gle fare to any point on its romantic and picturesque line, 
good until the 5th. 

0OOOOOOOOO<K>OOO-O<KK>OO0<><>O<K>0<>V 

1 ANDY CATHARTIC 

CURE CONSTIPATION 

Constipation Afflicts 

part of the people all the time, 
all the people part of the time. 
1 Are you a chronic or occasional sufferer from constipation ? i 
Do you want a sure, pure cure ? 

; CASCARETS (eat 'em like candy) will stimulate ; 
your liver, regulate your bowels, leave your i 
blood clean and rich, sweeten your breath and \ 
make your stomach do its work. 

CASCARETS KILL DISEASE GERMS, cure[ 
sick headache, taste good and do good, please ' 
the children, destroy and drive off worms and i 
other parasites. 

A ioc box will prove their merit, and put you on i 
, the right road to perfect and permanent health. Try ', 
' a 10c box to-day 1 If not pleased, get your money j 
back. Larger boxes, 25c or 50c. 

ADDRESS 

Ster ng Remedj Co. ; 

CHICAGO OR 
NEW YORK. 263 ' 

6000000000 00000-000000000000000 c 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Best & Belcher Mining Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Best & Belcher 
Mining Company will be held at the office of the company, room 33, 
Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal., on 

MONDAY, the 11th DAY OF JULY. 1398, 
at the hourof 1 o'clock p. m., for the purpose of electing a Board of Direc- 
tors to serve for the ensuing year and the transaction of such other busi- 
ness as may come before the meeting. 
Transfer books will be closed for two days prior to the dav of election. 

,. M. JAKFB. Seoretary. 
Office : Room 33, Nevada Block, 309 MoMtomery street, San Francisco, 
California. ^*^ 

HERCULES Gasoline and Oil ^gffigi?. 

gines (or pump- 
ing hoisting, milling, etc., are recognized as the standard. Write for par- 
ticulars. Heicules Gas Engine Works, 407 Sansome St., San Francisco. 



BOOKLET AND 
SAMPLE 


dSfJH^"Wi The 


FREE 


H&gLfflHHonly Genuine 


FOR THE 


J Beware of 


ASKING. 


^TjJHBKr imitations I 




CHICAGO FORM CO 



SPRING STEEL, NICKEL PLATED. 

25 CENTS EACH. 

It excels all others because it puts the 
stretch directly on the wrinkles; the middle 
or seam part of the leg is'free. Garment 
hangs by front and rear parts. It is quickly 
applied and is unequaled. Furnishers sell 
them or we mail them for the price. Address 
DEPT. L., 125 LA SALLE ST., Chicago, 111. 



Trade supplied by Equipment and Supply Co., o)-i Kearny St., S. F. 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 2, 1898. 



Southern Pacific Co. —Pacific System. 

Trains Leave and are Due to Arrive at SAN FRANCISCO: 

(Main Lice. Foot of Market Street.) 



From June 1, 1898. 



•8:00 A 
7:00 A 
7:00 A 
7:00A 
7:80 A 
8:00 a 
8:80a 


•8:80 a 
«:O0a 


10:00 a 
•1:00 P 


8:00 P 


COOP 


4:00P 


4:80 P 
4:80 P 
4:80P 


4:S0F 

• ttIP 
•0-00P 

9:00 P 
17:00 P 

8:00 P 



I Arrive 



45A 

ISA 

45 r 
:4Sp 
:16P 
:45P 



Nlles. San Jose, and way stations *» 

Benlcla Suisun. and Sacramento ... .... 10 

Marysrllle. Orovllle. and Redding, via Woodland 5. 

Vacavllle and Rumsey ■ . - ■ ■ — _ ■■ 8: 

Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, Napa, CahBtoga, Santa Rosa t 

Atlantic ErpreBB, Ogden and East .■ ,,'■ Mil' 

Nlles, San Jose, Stockton. lone, Sacramento, Marysvllle, 

Chtco, Tehama, and Red Bluff * 

Peters, Milton, and Oakdale ...... .......... ..... 1 

New Orleans Express, Merced, Fresno, Bakersfleld, Santa 
Barbara, Los Angeles, Demlng, El Paso. New Orleans, and 

Vallejo, Martinez, and way stations 7 

Sacramento River steamers •» 

San Jose, Nlles. and Way Stations !»: 

Llvermore, Mendota. Hanford, and Vlsalta 4: 

Llvermore. San Jose. Nlles and vVay Stations II" 

Fresno. Yosemlte, Merced. Martinez I* 

Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, Napa, Callstoga, El Verano 

and Santa Rosa - • 

Benlcla, Vacavllle, Woodland, Knight's Landing, Marys- 

vllle, Orovllle, and Sacramento 10 

Nlles. San Jose, Tracy, and Stockton 7: 

Stockton, Lodl, Oakdale (Jamestown for Yosemitei. Merced 12 
Lathrop. Modesto, Merced, Berenda, (Raymond lor Yosem- 
lte), Fresno, Mojave (for Randsburg), Santa Barbara and 

Los Angeles ■ .■ "•"•■■• I 

Santa Fe Route, Atlantic Express, for Mojave and East.... 8 

European mall, Opden and East ° 

Vallejo l « 

Uavwards. Nlles and San Jose " 

Vallejo, Port Costa, and way stations 18 

Oregon ExpreBB, Sacramento, Marysvllle, Redding, Port- 
la nd. Puget Sound and East o 

Sab Leahdro ajid Hatwabds Local. (Foot of Market St.) 



16 p 
16 p 



45 p 
45 p 

:O0P 

ISA 
IS F 
ISA 

:I5P 

:16 a 

:46 a 
ISp 
ISP 



45 A 
:45P 
45 A 
MSP 
:4SA 
:45P 



Kill A I 

9:00 A 
10:00A 
(11.00 A 
112:00 M \ 
(3:00 P 
5:00 P 
7:00 P 



Melrose. Seminary Park, 
fltchbtjro elm burst, 
San Leandro 
South San LEANTmn 

E9TODILLO. LORENZO. 

Cherry, and Baywards 

i Runs through to NUes. 
t From Nlles 



7:15 A 
<>S:45 A 
10:45 A 
11:45 A 
12:15 p 
'1:45 P 
12:45 p 
(5:45 p 

7:45 p 



Coast Division (Narrow Oauge). (Foot of Market St.) 

17-46 A Santa Cruz Excursion, Santa Crui and Principal Way 

Stations t8:05p 

8:16 A Newark, Centerrllle, San Jose, Felton, Boulder Creek, Santa 

Cruz and way stations 5 :50 p 

•2 16 p Newark, Centervllle, San Jose. New Almaden, Felton, Boul- 
der Creek, Santa Cruz, and principal way stations *10 5<>a 

4:15P San Jose, Glenwood and way stations 9:20 A 

<74:I5P Boulder Creek and Santa Cruz j9:2u a 

CREEK ROUTE FERRY. 

From San Francisco— Foot of Market street (Slip 8).— *7:15. 9:00, and 
1100 A. M., 11 :X. »2:00, 13:00. »4:00, 16:00 and ««:00P. H. 

From Oakland— Foot of Broadway— "9:00, 8:00, 10:00 A. K.; 112:00, •1:00, 
12:00, «3:00,t4:00 «5:00P. H, 

Coast Division (Broad Oauge). (Third and Townsend streets). 

•7:00a San Joseand waystatlons (New Almaden Wednesdays only) 1 :30 p 
17:30 A Sunday Excursion for San Jose, Santa Cruz, Pacific Grove, 

and Principal Way Stations t8:35P 

9 -00 A San Jose, Tres Pinos , Santa Cruz, Pacific Grove, Paso Robles 

San Luis Obispo, Guadalupe. Surf and prlnclpalway stations 4 :10 p 

10:40a San Jose and waystatlons »8:O0a 

11:80 a San Jose and way stations *8:8Sa 

•2:45 P San Mateo, Redwood. Menlo Park, Palo Alto. Santa Clara, 
San Jose. GUroy. Holllster, Santa Cruz, Salinas, Mod 

terey. and Pacific Grove ... .•10:f6 A 

•3-31 P San Jose and Way Stations »9:00 A 

•4:15 p San Jose and Principal Way Stations 9:45 A 

•6 :00p San Jose and Principal Way Stations o:85A 

6:80 P San Jose and principal way stations 6:30p 

6 :S0 P San Jose and way stations 7:30p 

tll:45P San Jose and way stations 7:30 p 

a for Morning. P for Afternoon. 'Sundays excepted. tSaturdays only. 

ISundays only. 

a Saturdays and Sundays. j Sundays and Mondays. 

The Pacific Transfer company will oatl for and check baggage from 
hotelB and residences. Enquire of Ticket Agents for Time Cards and 
other Information. 

Occidental and Oriental Steamship Co. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Steamers leave wharf, FIRST and BRANNAN STREETS, at 1 p h., tor 

YOKOHAMA AND HONGKONG. 

calling at Kobe (Hioro). Nagasaki and Shanghai, and connecting at 
Hongkong with steamers for India, etc No cargo received on board on 
day of sa.ling. 

Coptic (via Honolulu) Thursday, July 7. 1898 

Gaelic (via Hono ulu) .Tuesday, July 26, 1898 

Doric (via Honolulu) — Saturday. August 13. 1898 

Bkloic (via Honolulu) Saturday, S.-ptember 3, 1898 

Rodnd Trip Tickets at Reduced Rates. 

For freight or passage apply at Company's Offlce, No. 421 Market street, 
corner First. D. D. STTJBBS, General Manager. 



San Francisco and North Pacific R'y Co. 



SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. TlBUBON Ferry- Foot of MarketStreet. 

WEEK DAYS— 7:80,9:00, 11:00A h; 12:35, 3:30 5:10, 9:30 p h. Thursdays- 
Extra trip at 11:80 p H. Saturdays— Extra trips at 1 :60 and 11:30 F K. 

SUNDAYS— 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 a m; 1:30, 3:30, 5:00, 9:20 PH. 

SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO. 

WEEK DAYS— 6:10, 7:50,9:20, 11:10 ah; 12:45, 8:40,5:10ph. Saturdays- 
Extra trips at 1:65 and 9:36 ph. 
SUNDAYS— 8:10, 9:40, 11:10 AH; 1:40, 3-40,5:00,6:25 P H. 

Between San Francisco and Schuetzen Park, same schedule as above. 



Leave S. F. 


In Effect June 28, 1898 


ARRIVE INS. F. 


Week Days. 


Sundays. 


Destination. 


Sundays 


Week Days 


7:80 am 
3:30 pm 
5:10 PH 


8:00 am 
9:30am 
6:00pm 


Novate 
Petaluma, 
Santa Rosa. 


10:40 am 1 
8:10 PH 
7:35 PH 


8:40 A H 
10:26 ah 
6:22 FH 




8:00 AH 


Fulton, Windsor, 

Healdsburg, 

Geyaervllle, Cloverdale 


7:36PM 




7:30am 




8:30 PM 


8:23 P H 


7:30 AH 
8:80 PH 


8:00 AH 


Hopland, Uklah 


7:85 FH 


10:25 AH 
9:22 PM 


7:»U h 
3:30pm 


8:00 am 


Guernevllle. 


7:35PM 


10:25 A H 
9:22 P H 


7:80 AH 
6:10PM 


8:00am 
6:00pm 


Sonoma, 
Glen Ellen. 


10:40 AM 
8 :10 pm 


8:40 A H 
9:22 P H 


7:30AM 

8:30pm 


8:00am 
5:00pm 


Sebastopol. 


10:40a h I 
7 :35 P H 


10:25 A H 

9:22 P H 



Stages connect at Santa Rosa for Mark West Springs; at Lytton for 
Lytton Springs; at Geyserville for Skaggs' Springs; at Cloverdale for tbe 
Geysers; at Hopland for Duncan Springs. Highland Springs, Kelsey- 
vllle. Carlsbad Springs, Soda Bay, Lakeport, and Bartlett Springs; at 
TJktah, for Vichy Springs, Saratoga Springs, Blue Lakes, Laurel Del 
Lake. Upper Lake, Pomo, Potter Valley, John Day'B, Riverside Lter- 
ley's. Bucknell's Sanhedrfn Heights, Hullvtlle, Boonevllle, Orr's Springs. 
Mendocino City, Ft. Bragg, Westport, Usal. 

Saturday-to-Monday Round Trip Tickets at reduced rates. On Sundays, 
Round Trip Tickets to all points beyond San Rafael at half rates 

TICKET OFFICE— 650 Market St., Chronicle Building. 

A. W. FOSTER. Pres.A Gen. Manager. R. X. RYAN, Gen. PasB. Agent. 

Pacific Coast Steamship Co. ™ST*l^r»£*££' mr 

For Alaskan ports, 10 a. m. 
W June 5. 10. 15 20, 25, 30: July 5; transfer at Seattle. 

■3^^. For Alaskan ports (fiom Folsom St. wharf) 10 a u 

^%ii J«ne 5, 26; July 17; August 4, 26; transfer at Port- 

XlEVI land - 0r - 

m9|w For B. C. and Puget Sound Ports, 10 a. m., June 5 

^UEbK 10. 15 20, 2s, 30; Aug 5, and every fifth dav thereafter. 

^^^E.LI|M\ Fo-- Eureka (Humboldt Bay) .0 a. m., June 1, 7. 13. 19, 

^^■■H 25; July 1. and every sixth day thereafter. 

^ For Newport (Los Angeles) and way ports, 9 A. M June 
2, 6 10. 14, 18, 22, 26, 30; July 4, and every fourth day thereafter. 

For San Diego, stopping only at Port Harford, Santa Barbara, Port Los 
Angeles, Redondo, (Los Angeles) 11 A. m., June 4,8, 12. 16 20 24 28* 
July 2, and every fourth day thereafter. 

For Mexican ports, 10 a. If.. July 17. 

For further information obtain folder. 

The company reserves the right to change, without previous notice 
steamers, sailing dates, and hours of sailing. 

TICKET OFFICE— No. 4 New Montgomery street. (Palace Hotel.) 
60ODALL. PERKINS & CO.. Gen. Agts., 10 Market St.. San Francisco 



EAHIC 




SS "Alameda." Wednesday Julv l.lib at2p m 
Line to Coolgardle, Australia,' and Capetown 
South Africa. 

J. D. SPRECKELS & RROS CO. 

Agents, 114 Montgomery St. Freight offloe. !2; 
Market St., San Francisco. 



TUe Most Comfortable Waii 



Santa Fe 
Route 



To travel across the Continent. 

Through Pullman Palace and Tourist Sleep- 
ing Cars every day. 

Meals at Harvey's famous dining rooms. 

Get full particulars at Ticket Office 644 Mar- 
ket street. San Francisco, and 1118 Broad- 
way, Oakland. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
ChoMar Mining Company, 

Assessment No. 46 

Amount per Share 15 cents 

Levied June 6. irt-8 

Delinquent in offlce July 12, 1898 

Day of sale of Delinquent Stock August 4. 1898 

CHAS. E. ELLIOT, Secretary. 
Offlce— Room 79 Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco, California. 



Price per Copy. 10 Cents. 



Annual Subscription, $4.00 








Vol.LVIf. 



SAN FRANCISCO, JULY 9, 1898. 



Number 2. 



■ layby llit proprietor. FRED M.i/tl?IOTT 
SS A ' Francisco. Entered at. Han Francisco Post- 

ojfl.-. - Vatttr. 

The o." '■ -"its LETTER ..-.(■ City it at Templi Court: 

B il'iirnj (Front; E. Morrison. Eastern 
Repretentatire ) irhere information may tie obtained regarding subscrip. 
tion a i rates. 



IN view of the shameless character of Dreyfus's trial and 
the utter injustice of the French courts toward him, 
the public will be very slow in giving credence to the state- 
ment telegraphed from Paris that new evidence of his 
guilt has been discovered. If ever Justice was spat upon 
and Right trampled in the filthy mire of a bestial public 
opinion, the Dreyfus trial furnished its unbroken and infa- 
mous record. 

NEW YORK Republicans of •clean ideas and elevated 
principles, who are talking of nominating Theodore 
Roosevelt for Governor, are counting without their host 
or the lessons of recent history. Roosevelt is a practical 
believer in civil service reform. He is a fair representative 
of the best type of citizenship. Piatt would never endorse 
him, and the Independent tail is not strong enough to 
wag the Republican dog in the Empire State. Roosevelt 
is popular because of his impetuous patriotism, aside from 
his admirable qualities as a man, but the Piatt machine 
takes no account of virtues that bring no grist to Piatt's 
political mill. 

USE of salt water in street sprinkling, as suggested by 
the Merchants' Association should receive the careful 
attention of the Supervisors. The street sprinkling ring 
in this city has been permitted to control the work by pri- 
vate contracts, and as a result every season the dust is 
almost unbearable. It becomes a stinking, percolating, 
pestiferous nuisance. The sweepers at present are indus- 
trious agents of uncleanness and disease. The quantity of 
water used is totally inadequate. The city should hail 
any change that will bring relief. Salt water promises to 
do this. Let us have salt water, plenty of it, and one 
of the few disagreeable features of our summer season will 
have been removed. 

CHAIRMAN Gallagher is as good as his 
word. He promised to discourage the 
thievery — miscalled carelessness — in the letting 
of certain contracts and the making of repairs 
in the department. The boodle ring seems to 
have been headed by Director Burns, who or- 
dered the willing inspector, O'Brien, to certify 
the correctness of bills, and who entered upon 
contracts for more than $150,000 worth of work 
without submitting them to either his com- 
mittee or the Board. The contracts so made 
were illegal; the Board cancelled his fraudulent 
acts as far as possible, and the men who did the 
work will probably have to earn their money a 
second time or never get it. Gallagher's report 
at the last meeting of the Board brought all 
these facts out, and the boodler's fellow-committeemen de- 
nounced him in unmeasured terms. Burns, as chairman 
of the building committee, bad unusual facilities for ex- 
tracting the milk from the cocoanut, and he has shown 
a determination to make the most of his opportunities. 
The disclosures made uncover a scandalous condition of 
affairs, and Burns should be incontinently kicked out of 
office. The picture hereto attached would harmonize 
beautifully with the chaste atmosphere of a rogue's gal- 
lery. 




THAT unhanged scoundrel, Aguinaldo, who was pur- 
chased by the Spaniards, but would not remain 
bought, has again shown his appetite for dishonor by pro- 
claiming himself President of the Revolutionary Republic. 
With something like 30,000 armed natives behind him this 
wily half-breed will be mighty apt to give the soldiers who 
are going to Manila any amount of dangerous work before 
his army can be disposed of and himself brought to a drum- 
head court-martial. 



NOTWITHSTANDING the dull times, the Assessor's 
report shows that San Francisco has made a gain 
during the year ending June 30th, and in spite of the very 
material decrease of banking funds, wrich show a net loss 
of $1,406,011. The total taxable property of the city is 
$351,784,094. The banks would have enjoyed a still further 
decrease had it not been for a recent decision of Judge 
Seawell, under which the Assessor was enabled to nail the 
surplus and the undivided profits of these financial insti- 
tutions. 

THE efforts of Congress to assess the rich corporations 
in aid of the war have again shown that the consumer 
always pays the freight. The banks, telegraph, telephone, 
and express companies transfer the load they should carry 
to the shoulders of the consumer. The tax on provisions, of 
all kinds, the beer we drink, the clothes we wear — all the 
increase on these — is paid by the common people. The 
dollars of the corporations are taking care of themselves 
with old-time promptness, and it is the laboring people 
who are paying for carrying the flag into foreign territory, 
fattening the thieving contractors for soldiers' clothing in 
San Francisco and dying for $13 per month. 



SALLANT Hobson and his no less gallant comrades 
have been exchanged, and are again beneath their 
country's flag. The vocabulary of honorable mention has 
been exhausted in properly describing their heroic deeds. 
The fact that the object they sought to accomplish was 
not attained, detracts nothing from their magnificent 
courage, which set the extreme mark and bound of human 
loyalty and devotion to their country. Prompt and gen- 
erous recognition should show the world that the nation 
is as quick to reward gallant deeds as American sailors 
are to perform them. 



IT is noted that some of the ladies of the Red Cross 
Society are still agitating their pet scheme for a hos- 
pital ship to be bought, equipped, and fully outfitted under 
their direction, the funds for all this — a mere trifle of 
$300,000 or so — to be raised by popular subscription. The 
Government understands the necessity of a hospital ship 
for service in the Philippine Islands or elsewhere quite as 
well as the ladies of the Red Cross Society, and as we ob- 
served last week, has the money at hand to build and 
equip it without waiting upon popular subscriptions. 
There should be no delays in providing the hospital ship. 
While the ambitious, well-meaning, but ill-advised ladies 
are struggling with a popular subscription of more than 
one-third of a million dollars for that purpose, our soldiers 
will be dying by the hundred for the want of it. The pat- 
riotic ladies of the Red Cross are getting into very deep 
water when they launch out into the buying or building of 
ships. They will meet with discouragement and certain 
failure in this latest intention. To be useful they should 
be content to work within the recognized lines of the noble 
society of which many of then are useful ornaments. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July q, 1898. 



DO OVER THE SEA POSSESSIONS PAY? 

THAT Hawaii, despite the best mind and conscience of 
the Country, would be annexed had become a foregone 
conclusion. The Jingoes are in the stirrup, and are riding 
their hobbies with as much abandon as the cowboys do the 
wild horses of the prairies. That there is any more sense 
of responsibility in the one case than in the other, may 
well be doubted. Jingoism is the ruling passion of the 
hour. It has found a way, not known to the constitution, 
to take in Hawaii and that is but the beginning of its 
career. It makes no secret of its designs. Our flag is to 
fly over the Philippines; not by virtue of any right that it 
has to be there, but simply because of the might of superior 
force. Some eight or ten millions of people, alien in blood, 
in religion and in thought, are to be governed, not by and 
with their consent, but as a conquered race. They are to 
be taxed without representation, and nearly every one of 
the causes of complaint formulated in our own Declaration 
of Independence, is to be inflicted by us upon a people who 
have as much right to the management of their own affairs 
as we have to-day, or as our Revolutionary fathers had 
more than a hundred years ago. No wonder that the 
reading of the long list of grievances we had against the 
King of England in 1770 was omitted, for the first time in 
our history from the ceremonies attendant upon our recent 
Fourth of July celebration! Then the Jingo policy is not to 
stop with annexing the Philippines. Naturally enough, 
the very name of the Ladrones (robber islands) induced us 
to take them in on the way. They had not so much as 
heard of the war, but they were seized, annexed, and their 
Government captured and deported, all the same. The 
Carolines are to come next, and with their acquisition we 
may rest content so far as the Pacific is concerned, but 
only for awhile. It is of the essence of national earth hun- 
ger that it should grow upon what it feeds. Furthermore, 
the Jingoes frankly avowed during the Hawaiian debate 
that we should seize and keep both Cuba and Porto Rico, 
and that ultimately both San Domingo and Hayti must fall 
into our hands. 

It is truly a vast programme that would have been 
laughed to scorn three months ago, but which, if the pre- 
sent temper of Congress and the people holds out, is as 
sure to go through as that the day follows the night. The 
hope of conservative men is that when the excitements of 
war are over, there will come a sober second thought, and 
a calm reconsideration of a momentous departure that is 
utterly un-American from every point of view. From hav- 
ing passed all our independent years in deprecating Eng- 
land's robbery of foreign lands, we have suddenly changed 
to admiration for. and imitation of her policy in that re- 
gard. In that connection, some very useful educating of 
our peop'e can be done. When considerations of right and 
conscience fail, the pocket argument often prevails. Do 
over-the-sea possessions pay? Do they in reality, as many 
people imagine, add to the fortunes and streugth of Eng- 
land? Not at all. They are the most dreaded source of 
her weakness. They furnish her with no markets that 
she would not otherwise have. Their need of protection 
compels England to keep ahead of all Nations on the Sea. 
Her naval expenditures are becoming greater than even 
she can bear. Were it not for her Colonies, her own chalky 
cliffs and land fortifications would suffice for her defense 
against a foreign foe, and ber great fleet could be dis- 
pensed with. These long have been and are to-day the 
opinions of Englishmen themselves. Disraeli, who as a 
courtier was the greatest of Imperialists, yet placed on 
record the opinion that "England could never play a free 
hand while the Colonies were a millstone around her neck." 
Lord Salisbury, only a few weeks ago, warned the Lords 
that "the strength of England was already dangerously 
taxed by her foreign dependencies." Mr. Chenery, long 
editor of the London Times, declared some years ago, that 
"the Colonies were not feeders — they were suckers." So 
far, we have quoted Tory opinions. 

The Liberals have been even more pronounced. John 
Bright was for letting all the English speaking possessions 
go, as the American Colonies had gune. The United 
States, he held, had greatly increased their purchasing 
capacity by Independence, and that, consequently, they 
were of more benefit to the Mother Country as a 
ereignty than as a dependency. Mr. Gladstone wrote no 



longer ago than 1894, that: "I have always held that we 
are bound by the ties of honor and conscience to the 
Colonies. But the idea that they add to the strength of 
the Mother Country, appears to me to be as dark a super- 
stition as any that existed in the Middle Ages." Yet that 
very "superstition" is to-day the prevailing belief in 
these United States. England had to have Colonies, at 
any cost. "The tight little island" was overcrowded, and 
the people in danger of falling off into the sea. The hive 
being full, the young had to swarm off and form Colonies 
for themselves. As this condition does not prevail on this 
continent, the only motive for acquiring Colonies is totally 
lacking. We have yet within our own States, areas 
many times larger than the Philippines, that are practi- 
cally unoccupied. Home development is yet to the profit 
and advantage, in every way, of the American people. 

Where the School Certain of our School Directors have 
Money Goes. during the week been speaking out 

in meeting, and telling a few things 
that it greatly concerns the taxpayers to know. It ap- 
pears that the large sum of $150,000 is just now being ex- 
pended by the chairman of the building committee on so- 
called "improvements" that have not been authorized by 
the Board, or by any committee thereof, and for which no 
bids were invited and no contracts let. Chairman Burns 
simply went ahead, it is declared, and incurred expendi- 
tures amounting to this vast sum, without even so much 
as consulting the members of his committee. How the 
money can be got out of the Treasury to pay for such un- 
authorized work, we do not pretend to say, but would 
very much like the Auditor, Treasurer, and the members 
of the Board of Education to tell us. We had supposed 
that only a majority of the Board could order works of 
such magnitude to be done, and that such orders were 
duly recorded in a book of minutes. We bad further sup- 
posed that all bills were required to be audited by the 
Finance Committee, and, if found correct, reported to the 
Board for its approval. We also believed that all work, 
except small repairs done by the carpenter shop, was let 
by contract to the lowest responsible bidder. But it ap- 
pears that we were entirely mistaken on these points, 
and now we confess ourselves altogether at sea as to how 
the public money is got out of the Treasury of this munici- 
pality. Director Gallagher has declared in open Board 
that "he could not understand how payment could be 
made for this work. He could find no memoranda author- 
izing it. There was an immense amount of work being 
done which, to his mind, was entirely unnecessary, and the 
expenditure was so large that they would soon be face to 
face with a big deficit." It further appeared that Di- 
rector Burns "signed for the Board, let contracts with- 
out consulting it, and held no meetings of the Building 
Committee." Director Drucker said "he was surprised 
to find the immense amount of work going on of which he 
knew nothing. Not knowing what was going on, he de- 
clined to be responsible, and now resigned as a member of 
the committee." Director Armer remarked that "the 
proposition amounts to this: there is about$150,000 worth 
of work in progress without the Board knowing anything 
at all about it." But the Board must not be permitted to 
escape its responsibility. It ought to know, and must be 
made to know, what is done with the money entrusted to 
its care. It leaked out that Burns had put men to work 
whenever his fellow-directors sent them. Dies that fact 
account for the milk in the cocoanut? Have thev all been 
partaking of the pork? More will have to be'heard of 
this matter. 

Modern Ever since the nations have been building 
Warships, great warships there have been differences 
of opinion as to their merits; and, while mil- 
lions upon millions of money have been expended in these 
vast armaments, it has never been practically settled 
that the modern war vessel would prove to be a fighting 
machine worth its cost. To European nations not the 
least interest of the war between the United States and 
Spain lay in the probable demonstration of the weakness 
and streLgth of these huge masses of steel under action, 
and it was supposed that the problem would receive prac- 
tical solution when the navy of this country and the fleets 



WITH S. F. NEWS LETTER. 



JULY 9, 1898 




-i? 



(?**&* 



MEN WE KNOW 
Irving M, Scott 



July 9, 1898. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



of Spain measured tonnage, armor plate, ami 
Two engagements have been fought, with results tl :ii are 
known to the world; and, while the destruction of the 
ships of the enemy has been terribly complete, there yet 
remain undisturbed at least some doubts and theories that 
prevailed before the Spanish flags went down. 

The reason for the undetermined result is to be found in 
the soldier behind the gun, in the brain of the thinking 
officer rather than in the insensate mass of steel beneath 
bis feet and the messengers of deadly hail that make argu- 
ment in a language boisterous enough to be heard around 
the world. At Manila the completeness of the American 
victory affords indisputable evidence of the weakness of 
the Spaniard rather than the inferiority of the Spanish 
ship. The absolute fighting quality of the vessels that 
went to the bottom was not determined. Their gunners 
were unable to place their shells; their aim was so wild 
that, had the American ships been made of wood, not one 
of them would have been destroyed. At the achievement 
of Sampson's fleet, at Santiago, in a measure the same 
condition prevailed. Cervera fought a runaway engage- 
ment, and the same wild gunnery that invoked the Don's 
defeat at Manila rendered his defense abortive. He in- 
flicted but little injury upon his enemy. Had he boldly 
met the issue; had he fought rather than fled, the effect- 
ive resistance of armor plate and the destructive pene- 
tration of shells would have been demonstrated beyond the 
inaccuracy and quibble of theory. A fight to a finish be- 
tween guns and ships of equal size would have swept away 
every doubt. The remarkably accurate aim of the Ameri- 
can guns showed their immense superiority. The fleets 
were not evenly matched. Had the Spanish ships been 
manned by English or German sailors the ultimate result 
would have doubtless been the same, but the relative 
merits of the vessels would have been established. 

The great battle of Sunday vindicated the American 
preference for heavy guns. It has been the contention of 
foreign nations that no ship could be built strong enough 
to resist the terrific recoil and wrack of thirteen-inch 
guns; that carriages would yield, and after a few shots 
the pieces would be thrown out of service. The en- 
gagement of Sunday shows that the heaviest guns in our 
navy can be securely placed and fought. In no single in- 
stance was there accident or delay in serving these great 
pieces, and they came through the engagement in perfect 
order. The fight also showed that the deadly torpedo 
boat is not as formidable as was generally supposed. 
Under the accurate fire of the American vessels these 
small and swift destroyers were completely at the mercy of 
their enemies. They were literally torn to pieces by the 
terrific hail of iron that was poured upon them. 

A Terrible Famine The dailies are missing not a little of 
In Russia. the world's news these times. The 

■war has given us a world of our own, 
and, for the time being, outside happenings appear to have 
but little interest for the average daily editor. Or it may 
be that the bill for telegraphing war news is so large that 
the average proprietor does not care to do more than 
supply what seems to be the most pressing demand of the 
hour. Be that as it may, it is certain that the readers of 
the dailies are not getting their accustomed budgets of 
either home or foreign news. One of the important items 
that is being freely discussed by our European exchanges, 
is the terrible famine that prevails throughout a large 
part of Russia, but of which we have seen no mention in 
our own press despatches. It appears that nineteen pro- 
vinces, with a population of forty millions, are affected by 
the bad crops of last year to such an extent that thou- 
sands are dying daily from hunger, typhus, or, in other 
words, from starvation. The Anglo-Russian says that: 
"when meals are procurable at all, they are partaken of 
but once a day, the bread consisting more of the bark of 
trees, leaves, and chaff, than of flour; that diseases have 
broken out everywhere, as the result of cold and hunger; 
that large numbers of peasants have been compelled to 
sell their horses and cows at an average price of four 
roubles, or about two dollars per head; that in numerous 
cottages the hedges and barns have been burnt during the 
winter as fuel; that the very thatch from the roofs has 
been consumed in food for the cattle; that in several pro- 
vinces the peasants, to save themselves from utter starva- 



tion, offer their labor, with that of their horses, for the 
sum of twenty kopecks (S cents) per day." The worst of 
it is that no one section of the population in the provinces' 
is rich enough to organize for relief. The cry is for assis- 
tance from the Government, which until lately endeavored 
to ignore the prevailing condition of things. But now it is 
thoroughly aroused, and is making extensive use of the 
military to distribute food, and, in many cases, clothing to 
the needy. In Finland, Poland and the Baltic region the 
distress has not been so severely felt. This is being ac- 
counted for because "the population in those portions of the 
empire still enjoy remnants of their old social institutions. 
which help them in ar organized manner to combat the 
elements of nature, mitigate the effects of drought, and to 
be generally prepared to meet any possible calamity." 
The soil in the provinces now affected by the famine is 
said to be "incomparably richer and more productive than 
that of the sections named, but the population is thorough- 
ly Russian, and, as su^h, depends upon the Government to 
do for it what it might better do for itself. Absolute 
Autocracy is not productive of a self-helping people. As 
a consequence, Russia is too much occupied at home just 
now, to think of making trouble abroad. 

La Bourgogne. The sinking of the French liner, La 
Bourgogne, off Sable Island last Mon- 
day morning, and the drowning of more than GOO passen- 
gers, adds a chapter of horrors to the disasters of the sea 
without parallel in history. There is something peculiarly 
terrifying in the thought of collisions on the ocean. There 
is such a sense of utter helplessness and supreme inability 
to battle against the desolation and might of the sea, that 
the strongest heart is appalled. In the case of La Bour- 
gogne savagery from within was greater than the certain 
death without. Men, maddened by fear beyond the wildest 
fury of beasts, tore at each others' throats for life, and 
with knives reeking with the blood of pleading women and 
little children, beat them back and down to the more mer- 
ciful embrace of the ocean. It was such a picture of utter 
horror that the heart stands still in contemplating it, and 
it places the unreasoning brute above the fear-frantic 
creatures who forgot the gentleness of the wild boar in 
the struggle for their wretched lives. 

As in nearly all instances of great loss of life, there is a 
lesson to be learned from the destruction of La Bourgogne 
and the pitiful deaths of her passengers, that may well be 
heeded by other steamships. A dense fog enveloped the 
sea at the time of the collision. The vessels were upon 
each other before they were seen. The great liner was 
tearing through the water at a 17-knot gait, and taking 
every chance of just the fate that sent ship and passen- 
gers to the bottom of the ocean. Had ordinary precau- 
tions prevailed no fatality would have occurred. The ves- 
sels would have kept miles apart, or if they had crossed 
each other's track the steamship could have saved herself. 
The race against time in the case of La Bourgogne meant 
a race for swift and awful death. But it is perfectly safe 
to say that the "greyhounds" that sail out of New York 
this week, and the next, will profit nothing by the French- 
man's fate. Competition is too keen to permit reasonable 
rules of safety to prevail. Hours and even minutes are 
now counted between America and foreign shores, and 
people are always willing to take the chance that fate or 
fortune places in their hands. 

The New For fifteen long years past Congress 

Bankruptcy Law. wrestled with the subject of a general 
Bankruptcy Law, but the more it 
wrestled, the further apart did its members seem to get. 
The conflicting views appeared to be impossible of recon- 
cilement. The commercial States of New England, New 
York and Pennsylvania desired a reasonable protection 
for mercantile credits. These, they claimed, were the 
basis of the country's business. Without credit an exten- 
sive business could not be built up, and credits were being 
withheld from many States, by Eastern houses, because the 
local laws affordedno guarantee that the dishonest trader 
would be held to his just liabilities. Men became bankrupts 
in order to grow rich by the process. It was a new way 
to pay old debts. On the other hand many Congressmen 
from the South and West were especially mindful of the 
interests of the debtor class. Prompt payments were de- 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 9, 1898. 



sirable, thev said, but deferred payments were better than 
no payments at all. The city merchant, they urged, 
should not have it in his power to plunge a creditor into 
bankruptcy upon his first default; in fact they did not be- 
lieve in bankruptcy proceedings under any circumstances. 
If a judgment could not be collected, it should be held in 
abeyance until outlawed, and then it should be wiped out 
altogether. Of course, this line of argument did not indi- 
cate the possession of the highest possible order of com- 
mercial morality, but it prevailed during the many years 
that the Country has been without a National Bankruptcy 
Act. Strange to say, however, the opposing sides got to- 
gether the other day and promptly passed a measure, 
which, having received the signature of the President, is 
now the law of the land. Passed in haste, it is likely to 
be repented at leisure. Under its provision no wage 
earner, and no person engaged chiefly in farming, can be 
made an involuutary bankrupt, but such persons may take 
advantage of the benefits of the law, if they see fit. Just 
why farmers and mechanics should not be compelled to pay 
their debts like other people, does not appear. Surelv 
such exemptions from the provisions of a general law are 
unconstitutional. They are class legislation in its most 
direct and worst form. The appearances are that its 
framers did not intend it to be an operative measure. 
The officials who are to carry it into effect are to be paid 
by fees so small that no man could afford to waste his time 
over such unprofitable business. Then again, bankrupts 
are allowed the exemptions prescribed in State laws exist- 
ing when the act went into effect. The California Legis- 
lature, at its last session, exempted about everything a 
bankrupt could own; so that to become a bankrupt is to 
become proof against attachments or executions. The 
new enactment is simply a measure for the protection of 
dishonest debtors. Its effect must be to still further res- 
trict commercial credits. 

The Vesuvius Is the Vesuvius, with her dynamite 
And Her guns, going to revolutionize the science 

Dynamite Guns, of war the world over? There is much 
reason to believe that she will. She 
has passed through the experimental stage, and is now a 
demonstrated success. The frequent bombardments by 
Admiral Sampson have shown how difficult it is to com- 
pletely silence shore batteries by ordinary shell fire. The 
enemy may be driven from his works, yet when the bom- 
bardment has ceased, he returns to find a number of his 
guns still in position, and capable of being served. This is 
because the steel projectiles used against fortifications, 
have so small a field of destruction. But projectiles of 
gun cotton reduce everything to absolute chaos within a 
hundred or more yards of the point of impact. A whole 
fort from its center all round to its circumference can be 
blown literally to atoms by a single dynamite shot that 
hits its mark or goes anywhere near it. The doubt here- 
tofore has been as to the practicability of hurling a charge 
of gun cotton with safety to the ship and crew. But the 
pneumatic gun appears to have surmounted all difficulties. 
It can be, and we now know that it has been, discharged 
with perfect safety to the officers working it. Admiral 
Sampson, himself an ordnance expert, had confidence in 
the Vesuvius, and gave her an opportunity to show what 
she could do. The results of her trials at Santiago are 
held to be highly satisfactory. The enemy has been un- 
able to harass her while getting into a position to shoot. 
Against fortifications she works best at night, for her 
pneumatic guns in firing emit no flash, gas or smoke to 
betray her position to the foe. As silent as the grave this 
novel engine of destruction hurls her terrible projectiles, 
each of which is equal to many broadsides of the most 
powerful powder guns. The destruction is terrific, and 
the moral effect upon the garrisons manning the enemy's 
guns, may be more easily imagined than described. If it 
)>e true that the more terrible war can be made the fewer 
wars there will be, it ought to follow that fleets of the 
Vesuvius type will render war too frightful for anybody to 
contemplate. But, then, it ought to be that, anyhow. It 
is a barbarous business at best. 



IBS In Waist Sets. Links and Buttons. Sterling silver and 
silviT glided from 35 cents up. J. N. Brittain, Jeweler, '£! Geary street 

Indigestion dies where Jackson's Napa Soda lives. 



THE HIBERNIA'S ANNUAL STATEMENT. 

THE annual statement of the Hibernia Savings and 
Loan Society shows the affairs of that splendid finan- 
cial institution to be in a most flourishing condition. The 
total assets of the Hibernia Bank are $42,570,454.56, and 
are divided as follows: Promissory notes 126,659.267.18; 
United States 4 per cent bonds $10,500,000, and District 
of Columbia bonds $148,5110— actual cash value $11,363,- 
493.93; Miscellaneous bonds, $1,350,034.70, and accrued 
interest S136.S14.38j real estate — city and country — 
$653,252.01; bank building and land $564,403.28, and cash 
in bank belonging to the corporation SI. S43, 249. us, making 
grand total assets $42,570,454.50. The total reserve fund 
of the Hibernia foots up the handsome total of $2> 883, 145.88. 
The name of the Hibernia Savings and Loan Society on 
this coast is synonymous with the Bank of England in 
London. It is a financial institution founded on conserva- 
tive management, directed by the soundest judgment and 
is as secure as Gibraltar. The bank's holdings of more 
than ten millions in Government 4 per cents 
is an illustration. Some time ago Judge Tobin, 
finding a very large sum of money in the bank's 
vaults, and realizing the difficulty in placing it all here, 
went East and by careful manipulation was able to pur- 
chase this large block of bonds on most favorable terms. 
By this deal the average interest earnings of the Hiber- 
nia's funds have been largely increased. The placing of 
immense sums in such a way as to guarantee absolute 
security of the principal and certainty of interest is not air 
easy matter, and the sound judgment and management of 
the Board of Directors in exchanging the millions of the 
bank's patrons for Government 4 per cents was one of the 
shrewdest financial deals ever recorded here. The large 
suras that the Society has loaned throughout the city and 
adjoining country is protected by gilt edge security, and 
while the institution always holds large reserve funds its 
loans are characterized by the conservative judgment that 
insures absolute security. The entire history of the 
Hibernia Savings and Loan Society has been such as to 
entitle it to the confidence of the financial world and the in- 
vesting public. Its patrons are to be congratulated up- 
on having their funds placed in the care of the gentlemen 
who have immediate control of the affairs of that sub- 
stantial institution. 



THE News Letter presents with this issue a pen 
sketch of one of the best-known and most progres- 
sive citizens of the city and State — a gentleman connected 
with one of the greatest manufacturing establishments in 
the whole country — an institution whose well-finished 
work has brought distinction and honor to San Francisco 
on two seas. The battleship Oregon before Santiago and 
the Olympia before Manila demonstrated to the world that 
the genius and enterprise of the Union Iron Works do 
make as good warships as the world can produce. Irving 
M. Scott, patron of art and enthusiastic promoter of 
every material interest of this State, is now in Russia, 
where he will doubtless close a contract for the construc- 
tion of some of the new war vessels the Czar has deter- 
mined to build. His successful mission will mean the dis- 
tribution of millions of dollars among the working men and 
merchants of San Francisco. 



ftMONG the chief qualifications for hospital service is 
intelligence, as witness the case of Mr. Elihu Joseph- 
son of Angel Isiand. Mr. Josephson is a druggist by occu- 
pation and a soldier by choice. Elihu wishes to distinguish 
himself in the only really dangerous part of a soldier's life 
— that of falling into the hands of the surgeon. As has 
been said, Elihu is intelligent. One day there approached 
Josephson and four men, and the men bore a litter, and on 
the litter was a man. "Great Scot," said the doctor, "what 
case is that? Broken leg, or has he been blown up in an 
explosion, or what?" "No, sir," answered Josephson, 
gravely. "What, then, in thunderis the matter with the 
man?" "Toothache, sir." Mr. Josephson deemed it the 
proper method to convey a toothache case in a litter. 

FlNlstattonery, steel and copper-plate engraving. Cooper & Co., 740 

Market street. San Francisco. 

Jackson's Napa Soda water cares dyspepsia. 



July 9, 1898. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



1 



uti 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 milium mini 



HOME DEGORATIOM- 

IIUIIIIIIIIIIIIlllllllllllllllllllIll 



ftCOSY little smoking-room is thus described: has a high 
dado bung with a paper that closely imitates Chinese 
matting of a dull yellow green color. This is capped 
narrow shelf supported by brackets of simple outline, 
which serves as a resting place for bowls of tobacco, 
quaint German steius, boxes of cigars, and all those odds 
and ends that the smoker wants to have ready to hand. 
Above this shelf the rest of the low-studded wall is hung 
with a paper of warm reddish general tone, which is a 
c'ose imitation of the pattern and coloring of the old-fash- 
ioned cashmere shawls. Here and there against this hang 
pipe racks of delft ware filled with rows of long church- 
wardens, or the more prosaic corncob pipes with reed 
stems. The ceiling paper has a white ground, on which is 
a tiny figure in paie green. Beside the comfortable easy 
chairs, cushioned with Morris pattern liberty velvet, there 
are low divans, covered with Oriental stuffs and neaped 
with bright-colored cushions. The broad fireplace of rough 
red brick is finished with a simple mantel, surmounted by 
an old-fashioned triple mirror, with a gilded frame, orna- 
mented at the top with an eagle, from whose mouth 
streamers of very conventional ribbon stretch along the 
top bar of the frame. The woodwork 
of the room is white pine, which has 
been stained a forest green. The 
bro3d window, high up above the floor, 
whose broad shelf contains a row of 
potted plants, is glazed with crinkled 
white glass, set in fantastically 
fashioned wood muntins, and is en- 
tirely guiltless of curtains. 



OBITUARY. 

THk.MAS H. Buckingham, senior member of the well- 
known firm of Buckingham & Bocht, of this oity, died 
at l>lue Lakes, Lake County, this State, on June 27 tl 
t lie advanced ago of seventy-four years. He was an Eng- 
lishman by birth, hut came to California many years ago. 
He was a public-spirited citizen, and was identified with 
the manufacturing interests of the city. He was an in- 
fluential man of strict integrity. He leaves a widow add 
daughter. Mrs, Kate Chalmers, of Stockton, and two sons, 
\v. p. ant! T. H. Buckingham. 

The death of Jerome B. Lincoln, 
Jerome B. Lincoln, which took place last Monday at his 

home in this city, came as a shock to 
his many friends. Mr. Lincoln was a popular and well- 
known clubman, an attorney with offices in the Mills build- 
ing. His illness was brief, and its fatal termination totally 
unexpected. He was unmarried, and a widowed mother, 
relict of the late Jerome Lincoln, survives him. 



For a cool head — drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



"What makes you put a halo over his head when you 
draw a caricature of a politician?" "That isn't a halo," 
replied the cartoonist, "that's a political ring." — Wash- 
ington Star. 



There is a return to the front 
knockers of olden times, and although 
not in such ponderous forms much the 
same devices are presented. Masques, 
griffin heads, and other fantasies hold 
the loosely hung iron ring. 

* * * 

No kind of furniture looks so well in 
a small room as rattan or bamboo. 
A rattan couch piled with cushions, 
two or three easy chairs of the same 
material, a bamboo stool, one or two 
high-backed and spindle-legged chairs, 
a lacquered table, and another of oak 
or cherry of simple lines and light 
construction, a wicker tea table, a 
little good bric-a-brac and a few water 
colors or etchings in narrow frames 
with wide margins — these give an air 
of elegance to a small room far more 
satisfying to the eyes than elaborate 
upholstery and proTuse decoration. 

* * * 

Temporary partitions can be made 
of Japanese matting tacked on a 
rough frame and finished by a narrow 

molding. 

* * # 

Too much stress cannot be laid upon 
harmony of colors in furnishing. 
Natural wood finish is a great snare 
in this respect. People who, for the 
sake of economy, have the whole of a 
house finished in one kind of wood, 
necessarily narrow the choice of colors 
for furnishing to the ones which will 
accord with that special wood; and 
either have a house all off one piece, 
or get some disagreeable combinations 
according as they consider or ignore 
the claims of the woodwork. Painted 
wood is much more easily managed: 
It can be painted either lighter or 
darker than the walls or a shade of 
the contrasting color may be used. 




2; 

8! 



The chances are nine in ten that the office 
boy will bring a cake of Ivory Soap if sent for 
" a cake of good soap." Be sure of it. Each cake 
of Ivory Soap is stamped " Ivory." No other soap 
is half so good. 

IT FLOATS. 

A WORD OF WARNING.— There are many white soaps, each represented to be " just 
as good as the 'Ivory';'' they ARE NOT, but like all ■ counterfeits, lack the peculiar and 
remarkable qualities of the genuine. Ask for " Ivory " Soap and insist upon getting it. 



■8 



Copyright, IBM, by The Procter * Gamble Co.. Cincinnati. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 9, 1898. 




f P|CA5UrC5 %m 

jf ^ " Wc obey no wand but pleasure's."— Tom Moor?. 

IP George Bernard Shaw were not forty 
bis "Plays Pleasant and Unpleasant" 
would be full of promise. One would say 
then that when he has got used to himself, when he is less 
dazzled by his own brilliancy, when he has had more ex- 
perience of men and women, and cares more about his art 
and less about his convictions, he will write most excellent 
plays. But he is past forty. He has told the public so a 
host of times, and he tells them so again on the first page 
of the preface to the Unpleasant Plays. His powers have 
presumably reached maturity. Forty is the prime of life, 
until you reach it, and then fifty is; but Mr. Shaw is not 
nearly forty in the plays. They are so entertaining but 
so finally unsatisfactory. They are forecasts of the fine 
work he would some day do, — if he were not already forty. 
I take it for granted that you know all about George 
Bernard Shaw, socialist, egotist, and playwright. His 
socialism is not particularly interesting to any one except 
himself; his egotism is amusing or irritating according to 
your own temperament or mood, of the moment; his plays 
are important to every one who loves the theatre. Only 
one of these plays has had a regular run, and that is 
Arm* and tin Mmi, which Richard Mansfield produced. 
Several of the others have had tentative performances, 
and Mr. Shaw declares that the principal obstacle to the 
production of all of them is himself. He now publishes 
them in two volumes, with copious reasons for doing so. 
Mr. Shaw is no doubt a very brilliant map. He says so 
himself, and he ought to know. "The most brilliant jour- 
nalist in London, " Max Beerbohm, his successor as dramatic 
critic of the Saturday Review, has called him, — Max Beer- 
bohm, whom Hunneker, the Raconteur of the Musical 
Courier, calls "a clever, insolent person." Mr. Shaw suf- 
fers, like most brilliant men, because other people have not 
the wit to know when he means what he says and when he 
doesn't. Probably he doesn't quite know himself: habit- 
ual brilliancy leads a man into this difficulty, from which 
it is the duty of less brilliant persons to extricate him. 
Not that it is possible at all times to tell Mr. Shaw what he 
means, but the meaning which he puts into his work does 
not matter at all to any one who can take a meaning out 
of it. 

In the first of the Unpleasant Plays, Widouxrs' House*, 
he must have meant to be serious because he is so dull. 
The first act is good satirical comedy, but in the second 
and third he is Shaw the socialist, and, as I said before, 
Shaw the socialist is not particularly interesting to any 
one except himself. In this play his moral convictions 
have got the better of bis art. He is much more interested 
in the social outrage he is exposing than he is in his play. 
Mis. Warren' t Profession is another play with a prominent 
purpose, but it is far more important as a drama than 
Widowers' Houses. It is certainly a play which would be 
very effective in performance but it is one which no Eng- 
lish or American manager would dare to produce for the 

next I couldn't say how long; The Second Mrs. Tan- 

gui mil came suddenly, but that is five years ago, and noth- 
ing more advanced has been produced upon the English 
stage since. The public tolerates lots of frivolous stage 
performances which tread the very verges of decency and 
frequently slip over, but a serious discussion of an impor- 
tant and universal social question, treated in a manner 
which need shock the propriety of no clear-minded person, 
as Mr. Shaw has treated it— of course they could not coun- 
tenance that. 

Mrs. Warren'* Proftssion was written for the Inde- 
pendent Theatre, which produces the unpopular master- 
pieces of Ibsen and Browning, and other dramatists 
who write over the heads of the people, but it was con- 
demned on moral grounds by the Queen's Reader of Plays, 
whose sanction it is necessary to obtain before any play 
can be produced in England. Mr. Shaw's earnestness of 
purpose in Mrs. Warren's Profession is beyond question, his 
stage craft is admirable and simple, and his dialogue ex- 



tremely entertaining, — but the men and women in all his 
plays are the most abnormal creatures. A heartless, brain- 
ful, eccentric lot, — they say the kind of things which people 
sometimes wish they had said or think they will say but 
which they never do say, and some very astonishingconver- 
sations result. His people are rude, violent, or ridiculous 
according to their impulses, with none of that reserve in 
each other's presence which makes the whole world con- 
sciously or unconsciously dissimulate. The women lay 
violent hands on one another when they lose their tem- 
pers, — women who are supposed to regard the conventions 
of life, and the young men insult their elders without re- 
striction, and act without the slightest sense of responsi- 
bility. Mr. Shaw is such a penetrating critic that human 
nature has no charms for him, but that does not mean that 
it has no secrets from him. He is not to be taken in by 
the tricks and fascinations of his fellow creatures. He 
knows the sources of their impulses, the good and the bad, 
and you know how simple it is to prove selfishness to be 
the ultimate motive of every action. If he thinks that 
these calculating, independent creatures of his are like 
the men and women of the world, his observation is very 
restricted, and if he makes them as they are because he 
thinks the men and women of the world ought to be so, he 
is an idealist in spite of his tirades against idealism. There 
are no tragedies in his plays, even when the situations 
ought to be tragic. There is the clash of contending in- 
terests which makes drama, but there is not the clash of 
affection with inclination in the same person which is the 
cause of most subjective tragedies. The Third Unpleasant 
Play is a topical comedy called The Philanderer, a satire 
on Ibsenism and uusexed clubs. It is necessary to remem- 
ber that this play was written in 1893, for it is the kind 
that is soon out of date in spite of its cleverness. 

Of the Pleasant Plays there are four: You Ntver Can 
Till, which is rather silly and quite unlikely, but withal 
amusing (all the plays are amusing except Widowers' 
House*), Anns inn/ l/ie Mini, which is an excellent comedy 
with a superb first act from a practical staging, and 
every other, point of view, The Man of Destiny, also an ex- 
cellent comedy in one act, which Mr. Shaw calls little 
more than a bravura piece for the two principal charac- 
ters, and Candida, — and give me Candida. 

Mrs Warren's Profession is the best complete piece of 
work in the two volumes, but in Candida Mr. Shaw reaches 
a height he never nears in any of the other plays. With 
his poet alone of all his people he touches the heart, and 
creates a character of real beauty. And Candida is about 
the most difficult of all the plays to estimate compactly. 
It is the most erratic and yet the most vital; far the most 
important as an example of Mr. Shaw's knowledge of the 
workings of the human mind, and yet as unconvincing as 
any as the portrayal of the manners of any kind of society. 
None of Mr. Shaw's people have any manners at all, and, 
if he meant only to amuse by showing how men and women 
would behave if they threw off social restrictions and 
obeyed every irritable impulse, he had a superb idea for a 
farce, but he evidently meant to be taken seriously in 
those plays in which he deals with serious social problems. 

Candida is a nice, sane, commonplace woman, quite the 
most so of all Mr. Shaw's women. She is happily married 
to a Church of England clergyman, — at least she thinks 
she is happily married, but Mr. Shaw as her creator 
knows that she isn't. Her husband adores her and lets 
her drudge for him. He takes himself in completely by 
his own self-sufficiency and personal attractiveness. If you 
know anything of Mr. Shaw, you know that he has only to 
think of a clergyman to fly into a passion. He shows up 
this poor parson mercilessly and makes of him a very 
amusing personage, but to gain his own point and work 
out a most interesting problem, he makes him act in a 
quite impossible manner. The poet also adores Candida. 
In Mr. Shaw's own words — "He is a strange, shy youth of 
eighteen, slight, effeminate, with a delicate, childish voice, 
and a hunted, tormented expression and shrinking manner 
that show the painful sensitiveness that very swift and 
acute apprehensiveness produces in youth, before the 
character has grown to its full strength. Yet everything 
that his timidity and frailty suggests is contradicted by his 
face. He is miserably irresolute, does not know where to 
stand or what to do with his bands and feet, and would run 
away into solitude if he dared; but the very intensity with 



July 9, 1898. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



which he feels a perfectly commonplace position shows 
great nervous force, and his nostrils and mouth show a 
fiercely petulant wilfulness, as to the quality of which his 
great imaginative eyes and fine brow are reassurinir He 
is so entirely uncommon as to be almost unearthly, and to 
prosaic people there is something noxious in his unearthli- 
ness, just as to poetic people there is something angelic in 
i»." It is this youth whom Mr. Shaw employs to reveal the 
parson to himself. He tells him that he loves his wife, 
that he understands her while ber husband does not, and 
that therefore she belongs to him. But it is in the con- 
duct of the parson through this crisis that Mr. Shaw re- 
veals the narrowness of his knowledge of men. Abstractly 
reasonable as the poet's arguments may be, they would 
never impress such a man as Mr. Shaw intends; he would 
never listen to them. But Mr. Shaw is interested in his 
problem, so he pursues it to the end in defiance of proba- 
bility. The man and the boy agree to let Candida choose 
between them. Granting the possibility of this situation, 
the scene is worked out with fine judgment. Candida de- 
mands what each has to offer her. Her husband speaks 
first. "I have nothing to offer you but my strength for 
your defence, my honesty of purpose for your surety, my 
ability and industry for your livelihood, and my authority 
and position for your dignity. That is all it becomes a 
man to offer to a woman." That is his offer, and the poet 
only says: "My weakness! my desolation! my heart's 
need!" With a fine touch of irony Candida says: "I give 
myself to the weaker of the two," and of course chooses 
her husband; he is just such a man as a nice, sane, common- 
place woman would love. There is a deep and true signifi- 
cance in the comparison of these two men, and a pathos in 
the poet's condition which I cannot find in any of the other 
plays. You may cot feel how real and strong the poet is. 
"'To prosaic people there is something noxious in his un- 
earthliness, just as to poetic people there is something 
angelic in it." 

* * * 

The revival of The Mikado is far away the best en- 
tetainment the Tivoli has offered for some time, and 
the decision to revive it has been amply justified by 
the patronage it has received and the pleasure it has 
given. Miss Seabrooke's sweet soprano voice is a great 
addition to the company. She sings all her music 
effectively, and especially in the song, "The Moon and 
I," creates a very favorable impression by her artistic 
performance. Miss Louise Eoyce is amusing as Katisha, 
but the music does not suit her voice, which is weak in the 
middle register. Mr. Phil Branson as the Mikado and 
Mr. West as Poo-Bah are excellent, and Mr. Stevens is 
furiously funny as Ko-Ko. It is a pity he does not keep 
to the text, for the lines Mr. Gilbert has written are quite 
amusing enough without his own embellishments. Mr. 
Boyce has not the voice to do justice to the music of 
Nanki-Poo. The male chorus is notably superior to the 
female. Next week von Suppe's Fatinitza will be pro- 
duced. It is to be followed by Amorita, Girqfle- Girofla, 
The Circus Queen, and then the grand opera season. 

* * # 

Mrs. Alice J. Shaw and two very nice daughters have 
been the stars of the Orpheum this week. Mrs. Sha? is 
the prima donna and the two nice daughters are the sup- 
port. Mrs. Shaw's tone is very sweet, and her virtuosity 
surpasses that of all other whistlers, but, unfortunately, 
like all of them she is unable to sustain a perfectly true 
pitch. Next week Joseph Hart, formerly of Hallen & 
Hart, will appear in his original sketch. The Quiet Mr. Gay; 
also Bert Coote and Julia Kingsley in their original sketch, 
Supper for Two, and Pleurette, in her toe dances. 

* * # 

Lost — 2h Hours will be the next production at the Co- 
lumbia, and in it Miss Madeline Bouton will play her orig- 
inal part. It will he played next week with The Littlest 
Girl, a dramatization of Richard Harding Davis' story, in 
which Mr. Frawley will appear as Van Bibber. 

The Bush-street Theatre is to be re-opened about 
August 27th, under the management of M. B. Leavitt. It 
will be called the Comedy, and will be entirely refitted, re- 
furnished and decorated. Comedy, minstrelsy, vaudeville 
and burlesque will be the attractions. . , 



h'nutt will be produced at the Alcazar Theatre next Mon 
day. with Mr. Lewis Morrison as Mephistopheles and Miss 
Florence Roberts as Marguerite. An elaborate produc- 
tion is promised. 

Miss Sydney Macdonald, who made her debut in the part 
of EmeUne. the slave girl, in Mr. Stock well's production of 
I "nclr Ton's Cnliin, is a young lady from Oakland. 




Turn it 
upside down 



It won't hurt it ! 



There are no dregs or 
sediment at the bottom. 



That's why drinkers of 

Evans' Ale 

Do Not Hesitate to 
Drain the Bottle. 

Two years in the wood to ripen before bottling. 

SHERWOOD & SHERWOOD 

Pacific Coast Agents 

Portland, San Francisco, Los Angeles 



r\\ rr 1 1 Fred Belasco, Lessee. 

nlcazar I neatre. 



Mark Thall, Manager. 'Phone Main 254. 



To-night and to-morrow night (Sunday), Frederick the Great. 
Week of July llth. Lewis Morrison, Florence Roberts Alcazar 
Stock spectacular production of 

FAUST. 

Our original prices: 15c, 25c, 35c, 50c, reserved. 

Ci 1 ' r V\ _l_ The "Gem" Theatreof the Coast. 

OlUmbia I n6a"tre, Friedlander, Gottlob&Co., Lessees 

Beginning next Monday : Fifth week of the popular favorites, 
theFrawley Company, presenting for the first time in this city 
the great comedy success. 

LOST--24 HOURS. 

Preceded by the one-act play, THE LITTLEST Gl RL. 
Watch for A gallant Surrender. 



Tivoli Opera House. 



Mrs. Ernestine Kreling, 

Proprietor and Manager, 

Last nights. Gilbert & Sullivan's favorite work, The Mikado. 
Next week, Von Suppe's martial opera, 

FATINITZA. 

Superbly cast; correctly costumed; elegantly mounted. "March 

Forward Fearlessly." 

Look out for The Circus Queen. 

Box office always open. (No Phone.) Popular prices, 25c and 50c 

01 San Francisco's Greatest Music Hall. O'Farrell St., 

r P I"16 U ITl . between Stockton and Powell streets. 

Week commencing Monday, July llth. More great new stars. 

dOE HMRT Z> GARRIE DE MAR, 

Legitimate sketch artists; Bert Coote & Julia Kingsley, com- 
edy stars in "Supper for Two"; Fleurette, Terosichorean ar- 
tist: Mrs. Alice Shaw and Daughters, the whistling prima 
donnas; Falke & Semon, musical comedians; Joses, Grant & 
Jones, the colored trio; Charles Wayne, eccentric comedian; 
Anna Caldwell, singing comedienne. 
Matinees Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday. 
Reserved seats 25c; balcony 10c; opera chairs and box seats 50c 



For Sale Cheap. 



STECK 
PIANO 



An elegant mahogany 

upright Steck piano, 

nearly new, will be 

sold for $300; cost $575. 

Address: "G. B." care this office 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 9, 1898. 




New York, 



THE Lord loves a shining mark, else why should Dr. 
Parkhurst's church steeple have been singled out to 
be struck bv lightning? The Doctor is the most noted re- 
former since the days of Luther. Perhaps if he had been 
at home, and attending strictly to church business, the 
lightning would have preferred some other high attrac- 
tion; but Parkhurst always spends his summers abroad, 
and he starts early. 

* * # 

Osculation is no longer practiced to any considerable 
extent on the continent of Europe. It is not considered 
good form, and when the different sexes now indulge in 
that sort of amusement it is considered simply une affaire 
Platonique. This Platonic idea is something that will not 
extend to this side of the Atlantic, for there is no diminu- 
tion in the business of the divorce courts. 

* # # 

It is time that Herman Oelrichs, of New York, should 
return home, for a cry of alarm is heard from the water- 
ing places. A sixteen-foot man-eating shark has made 
its appearance, and great is the consternation among 
those who disport themselves on the briny deep — specially 
in shore. Mr. Oelrichs is an acknowledged authority on 
terrapin and shark. He is fond of one and denies the 
man-eating powers of the o'.her. Now that the shark 
is at hand Oelrichs is wanted here to illustrate his theory 
personally. 

* * * 

Sylvia Gerrish, who jumped at one bound from her 
bucolic home in Oakland to the center of the comic opera 
stage in New York, and held it for a brief time, resplend- 
ent Id graceful curves encased in lavender tights, or living 
in quiet domestic retirement. That she is doing quite well 
in private life is evidenced by the fact that she has, like 
May Irwin, acquired the real estate habit, her latest 
acquisition being a handsome brown-stone Harlemwards. 
is a close student of Shakespeare, and believes in the 
idea, "put money in thy purse"— or real estate. 

* # * 

Brigadier-General Fred Grant is nothing if not original. 
Having duly sanded the floor of his tent, he next acquired 
a relic in the shape of a chair in which his lamented father 
used to sit, and in this he rests while sending out his sham 
battle orders. He takes special pride in showing the 
chair to visitors. 

* * 11 

Mr. Hearst, finding time sitting heavily on his hands, 
set a notable example to the editorial fraternity at large 
by going to the Santiago front. There he could see for 
himself that the war was being carried on according to 
Hoyle. No doubt Sampson, Shatter and Garcia unbosomed 
themselves to the young man, and his technical mind at 
one glance comprehended the situation. He modestly re- 
frains from saying what he suggested might be done to 
accelerate the forward movement. So far his example 
has not been followed. Mr. Pulitzer shows no signs of 
"seeing for himself." Mr. de Young pricked up his ears 
and got as far as Washington, where he concluded to stop 
and see what progress was making with the Paris Expo- 
sition bill. Mr. Spreckels has not been heard from yet. 
He might go on to Manila and see if Dewey is doing his 
duty. 

* * * 

The wisest of his generation may not forecast a woman's 
will. When it was announced that Mr. Lillian Russell had 
sued his lovely wife for divorce on agreeable grounds, it 
was thought that Lillian would jump at the bait like unto 
the trout when he goes for the fly. But she astonishes 
everybody by absolutely refusing her freedom. Tied she 
is, tied she will remain, and denying any desertion on her 
part, challenges her husband to the oracular proof. 
Wonders will never cease. 



John Hays Hammond, California's distinguished mining 
engineer, whose designated home now is "London, Eng- 
land," had the honor of being dubbed Master of Arts by 
Yale University at the commencement last week. Ham- 
mond was graduated there in 1876 in the collegiate de- 
partment, and no doubt his romantic experiences in South 
Africa contributed to his present promotion. "Jack" 
has always been true to Yale; even a baseball game in 
which Yale was partieeps oriminis enlisted his liveliest in- 
terest, and he would cross the seas, if possible, to see the 
annual boat race. 

# * * 

A few Californians floating around: W. W. Chapin, E. 
Brandenstein, Hoffman; Mrs. W. S. Morrow, Astor; 
Robert McKenzie, Buckingham; W. J. Hotchkiss, Nether- 
land; J. S. Merrill, Imperial: G. O. Heine, Manhattan; 
Mr. and Mrs. H. T. Lalley, Holland: Dr. Jacob Voor- 

sanger, Astoria. 

* # * 

"Joe" Redding has not lost his love for soul-inspiring 
music — at least as he sat in one of the boxes on the Madi- 
son Square Roof Garden Thursday evening, listening to 
"Tannhauser" as interpreted by the Metropolitan Band, 
he seemed oblivious to earthly surroundings, although 
among these was a beautiful brunette, whose dark eyes 
seemed to swim in liquid harmony. The moon, too, was at 
her full. It was a glorious night. Entre Noes. 

Recipes Sent Free. 
The N. Y. Condensed Milk Co., New York, send free upon reijuest, 
a pamphlet of recipes very valuable to housekeepers. They are the 
proprietors of the Gail Borden Eagle Brand Condensed Milk. Best 
infant food. 

Good guns and good ammunition won the victory at Santiago. 
Good quality wins the victory for both J. F. Cutter and Argonaut 
whiskies. Pure and mellow lhey are the best goods in the market. 
E. Martin & Co., 411 Market street, sole agents tor the Pacific 
Coast. 

The greatest musical hit of the season is "Dewey's Victory March" 
by Lee Johnson. The Park Band has played it for the past three 
Sundays, and by popular request has put it on for next Sunday. All 
the music stores have it. ' 

Jackson's Napa Sola knocks rheumatism. 



"Do you expect to hear often from your husband?" 
"Yes, he said he'd write, and I made him promise to give 
his letters to some other man to mail." — Detroit Free 
Press. 



TRY ALLEN'S FOOT EASE. 

A powder to be shaken into Hie shoes. At this season your feet 
Feel swollen, nervous and hot, and gel tired easily. If you have 
smarting feet or tight slmes, try Aliens I-Vot-Kase. It. cools 
the feet and make* walk) Cures swollen and sweating 

feet, bits ten and callous spots. Relieves corns and bunions of 
all pain and gives rest and comfort. Try it to-day, S >ld by all 
druggists and shoe stores for £5c. Trial package FREE. Ad- 
dress, Allen S. Olmsted, Le Roy, N. V. 



Moet& 
CI?an,don 



White Seal (Grand Cuvee) of ex- 
ceptional bouquet and dryness. 



— Court Journal. 



P. A. WILLIAMS, 

MINES. 



Room 1207 Claus Spreckels Building, 
San Fra-cisco, Cal.. U. S. A. 

Caulk Address "Claret.' 



DR. c). NICHOLS, 



(Formerly County Physician of Amador County.) 
Office: 21 Powell street, corner Powell and Ellis. Residence, 
St. Nicholas Hotel. Market St. Hours : 1 to 4 p. m. ; 7 to 8 p. m. 
Established since 1872 In San Francisco. 



July 9, 1898. 



SAN Ik NBWS I.HTTKK. 




THEY are very much in love with each oilier 
love, not exactly a young love, but a 
steady jog-trot love, which love, after all, is thi 

of love. They had no illu- 
sions, at least he thought 
they did not have. Be bad 
been in the waters of matri- 
mony before, and had been 
disillusionized, and so all 
promised fair sailing. He has 
quiet habits, a love of pugs, 
shopping, and other harm- 
less eccentricities — and she 
a wild and unconquerable 
passion for out-door sport, 
ridrng, driving, golfing, and 
the deuce knows what. And 
they were sitting together 
in the mullioned windows of 
the ancestral hall, built year 
before last, when the moth 
eaten tapestry proclaimed 
the ancieney of their demesne and the 
mustiuess of their family. " What is 
on your mind, darling?" cooed be, for 
his voice is like the distant echo of an 
angel's song; and she in raucous tones 
replied, "I wish I were a man." "By 
Jove!" he said, "it would be awkward 
for me. I couldn't marry you." "I didn't 
think of that," and a scarlet blush 
swept over her face, which vied with its 
color the carmine of her hair. And then she rose 
and looked steadily at him, and spake slowly, and 
with a dull thud each word fell heavily upon his 
palpitating heart. "If I were a man I would 
be a soldier. I can only luve a soldier. If you 
want my love you must be a soldier." And the 
man went down town and wept. For they were 
to be married in October, and his friends 
rallied around him and bade him hide away the 
and put on the countenance that is cheer- 
ful — for a soldier he is to be'— a Second Lieutenant, having 
a pull, and shortly he will show his shoulder straps and 
in the house of the sweethtart will there be joy and per- 
haps wishes from the pater that — well, let that be left to 
the imagination. 

The sympathy of every person who knows the facts must 
be with Mrs. Nat Britton in her suit for divorce, and there 
is an ardent hope that she will get all the money she asks 
for in the shape of alimony. The unfortunate woman in 
her suit says that she has suffered the tortures of the 
damned. She has. It is within the remembrance of people 
who are yet living in the Palace Hotel that several years 
ago they were awakened at midnight by the most piercing 
screams. They rushed to the rooms from whence the noise 
issued, and insisted upon an opening of the door or sending 
for the police. To their surprise they found it was Nat 
Britton engaged in castigating his wife 1 And yet Ameri- 
can husbands are claimed to be the only chivalrous hus- 
bands in the world. 

* * * 

That sweet and amiable creature who was once falsely 
called the best-dressed man in town, is again to marry. It 
is a matter of gross wonderment how that fellow should 
be able to secure a third wife— and this one is represented 
to be a sweet, innocent, lovable girl. Mr. Jack has only 
had two wives, each was good-looking, and each had some 
money. He squandered their fortunes and acted in so 
shameless a manner that they were forced to get a divorce. 
His evil habits were notorious and his manner of life was 
not commendable in any way — and yet these parents are 
going to trust the happiness of their daughter to a man 
with this record. Are they insane? 




have 
tear 



BOORD & SON, 

OLD TOM GIN. 
EXTRA DRY GIN. 
SLOE GIN. 

ORANGE BITTERS 
Liqueur Ginger Brandy 
RUM SHRUB 
OLD JAMAICA RUM and 
London Dock Pale Sherry 



LONDON, ENO. 




■■ t\it ami Ilarrtl" brand 
has been in nee by Ilooril 
,1 Bon since 1851. 



In Cases of 12 Bottles. 



CHARLES MEINECKE & CO., 

Sole Agents. 311 Saoramento St., S. P. 



Ring Up Main 122 



United Carriage Company 

Palace Hctel. Carriages, Coupes, and Victorias 
at all hours 



Ring Up Main 12 



Pacific Transfer Company 

20 Sutter Street. Only company which checks bag- 
gage at residences. 

THE WELLESLEY, 

u 1433 California Street. 

The Most Attractive Family Hotel in San Francisco. 

Enti'ely New in Every Feature. 

Mrs. Merry. Proprietor. 



Hotel Bella Vista 



1001 Pine street 



A First-class Hotel 



The Bella Vista is the Pioneer 
First-class Family Hotel of 
San Francisco. All the com- 
forts of a modern residence. 

MRS. A. F. TRACY 



New York. 



Madison Square, Broadwau and 23d 
Street. 



Under new management. Rooms single or 
en suite. Restaurant unsurpassed. Ele- 
gant in all appointments at moderate 
prices. 

Reed & Roblee, Prons. 
EUROPEAN PLAN. 



HOTEL 
BflRTflOLDl 

New York 



Occidental Hotel. 



A quiet home, centrally looated, for 
those who appreciate comfort and 
attention. 



Wm. B. Hooper, Manager. 



San Francisco 



Riqqs House, 



WASHINGTON, D. C. 



THE HOTEL PAR EXCELLENCE" 

of the National Capital. First class in all 

appointments. 

An Illustrated guide to Washington will be 

mailed free of charge, upon receipt of two 

2-cent stamps. 

0. G. STAPLES, Prop. 

The HOTEL RICHELIEU, and Myrtle avenues. 
Principal and finest family hotel of San Francisco. 

Hotel Richelieu Go. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 9, 1898. 



MINING LAWS GOVERNING IN ALASKA. 
NCMBER XIV. 

WHAT has been said in previous articles concerning 
applications for patent applies more particularly to 
an application for a single lode claim. But many contigu- 
ous locations may be covered by one application. 

Mill site locations may be embraced in quartz lode ap- 
plications, or they may be patented separately. It is 
essential that such land be non-mineral, not contiguous to 
a lode, and that no one claim exceeds five acres in extent. 
Placer claims upon unsurveyed lands must be officially 
surveyed, and plat must be posted the same as in lode 
claim applications. If the placer claim has been located 
upon surveyed lands and according to the light subdivis- 
ions no surveying or posting is required. 

The patent of a placer claim carries with it the title to 
the surface included within its lines as well as to the land 
beneath the surface. This includes all "blind" lodes or 
veins, without the extra lateral right. But if a vein known 
to exist within the boundaries of a placer claim is not 
specifically included in the application for patent it is held 
that it is a conclusive declaration that the claimant of the 
placer mine had no right to the possession of the vein or 
lode claim. Such known vein is subject to separate owner- 
ship and patent. 

A tunnel location cannot be patented, but it may be the 
subject of an adverse claim. Lodes discovered in running 
the tunnel, and which have been properly located on the 
surface by the tunnel owner, may be patented the same as 
other claims. 

Although the courts hold that the duplicate receiver's 
receipt issued to an applicant for patent is equivalent to 
the patent? still the Land Department does not lose juris- 
diction of the matter until the patent actually issues. 
Hence, the officers of the Land Department at Washing- 
ton may cancel or disaffirm the entry. This may be done 
upon its own motion or as the result of a protest tiled and 
made by some third party, who calls the attention of the 
Government to some fraud upon the part of the applicant 
or shows that he has failed to comply with some require- 
ment of the mining law. Upon such protest being made 
a hearing is ordered in the local land office to determine 
the question raised by the protestant. If the protest is 
sustained, the certificate is ordered canceled and the 
patent denied. A protest differs from an adverse claim 
in this, that it may be made by one having no interest in 
the property, and the proceedings are confined entirely 
within the Land Department. 

In this, as in other proceedings in the Land Depart- 
ment, an appeal lies in behalf of the claimant from the 
decision of the local land offices to the Commissioner of the 
General Land Office, and from him to the Secretary of the 
Intei ior. It has been held that the protestant has no 
right of appeal, as he has no substantial interest in the 
property; but this rule is not inflexible. 

The patent, says Mr. Justice Field, is the final act of the 
officers of the Government for the transfer of the title, 
and when that instrument is duly signed and sealed it not 
only operates to pass the title, but is in the nature of an 
official declaration by that branch of the Government to 
which the alienation of the public land under the law is in- 
stituted, that all the requirements preliminary to its issue 
have been complied with. 

After patent has issued, no annual or other work is re- 
quired upon the claim; surface boundaries are determined 
and the patentee is free from conflicting claims of title to 
the surface; but he may be divested of his title by the ad- 
verse possession of another, the exercise of eminent domain, 
and the sale of his property for delinquent taxes; be is 
still subject to suits for trespass and suits to determine the 
ownership of, or right of way to, cross lodes, which latter 
are excepted from the grant, and the right thereto, ex 
cept as to the space of intersection, being not lost by 
failure to adverse. 

A. H. Rli KETTS. 




San Francisco, June 16, 139H. 



New line of picture frames, in metal, gold, and old oak, green 
vory, aii'l Japanese gray ; also elegant line of picture mouldings. 
John F. Kennedy, Art Healer, 19 and 21 Post street. 

Jackson's Napa Soda is the finest table water in the world. 



^ot<^l £1 pa$o d<{ I^obl^s 



Under new management 



BEST CURATIVE 

AND BATHING 

WATERS 

IN AMERICA 

First Class. 



Appointments unsurpassed. Tub. plunec.mud 
and swimming baths in most powerful sul- 
phur waters in the world. Insuring quick 
and permanent cures for rheumatism, liver, 
kidney and skin diseases. Magnificent re- 
trofit for pleasure and recreation. Very hot 
sulphur Mud Baths, 1*2 F. ; Soda Springs, 
77*\; main Sulphur Sprint, nr? F Terms 
$!0to$i8 per week Two blocks from rail- 
road station. Fur her particulars apply to 
Traveler, 20 Montgomery street, or 
Otto E. Nf.vfh, Prop., Paso Robles, Cal. 




jHoteis Qazad^ro arjd El in ro ^- £ a ° t age - 

IN BEAUTIFUL SONOMA COUNTY 

Gateway to Paradise, at terminus North 
Pacific Coast R. R. No staging; only ten 
miles from ocean; hotels short mile apart 
under one management; best of attention, 
bowling riding, tennis, driving, fishing, 
shooting and outdoor swimming Open 
all year. Rates. $8 to $14 per week. 
Further particulars, 
F. M. Child, Manager, Cazadero. 

Or at 504 Kearny 
CALIFORNIA 5 10EAL BIG TREE AND FAVORITE RESORT. 

{Pacific Congress Springs, 

SANTA CRUZ MOUNTAINS, 
SANTA CLARA COUNTY. 

Remodeled and under new management. 

A new swimming tank has just been completed--175x80 ft. 

It takes O hours and J_ dollars to get there. 

JOHN S. MATHESON, Manager. 



ffiubicon Springs, 

On Rubicon River, 10 miles from 

McKlnoey's. LAKE TAHOE. 

Primitive, clean h* me ccoklng. 
New management; new furnishing; 
new stages; tine fishing and boating 
no river und lakes; the drive to the 
springs is the most picturesque for 
est drive in California. These springs 
are noted formediciral value in stom- 
ach, liver, and kidney troubles, and 
relief for obesity. 

17 to 10 per week 

A. ABBOTT, Manager, 




The Discoverer of Rubicon Springs. 



IF YOU ARE SEEKING!::^ 



for a delightful and healthful resort 
fur the summermontbs forvour fam- 
ily, not so remote from town but that 
you can be with them without neglecting your business i 

If you arc In search or a good table and comfortable sleeping apartments 
only' an hour and ravel from San Fraucisco with half-hourly com- 

municatton, d aing; 

If it Is your wish to confine your summer's outing by a moderate outlay, 

your^t.nUonisdmcedto fifty WARDS PARK, 

At the terminus of 'he Oakland, San Leandro and Haywards Electric Ry. 
Or if you are fond of touting here you will Bud a large number of commodious 
platforms arranged convenient to the hotel dining room, on one of which 
you may erecl tour tent: 

A choice musical programme is rendered every Sunday afternoon on the 
l .ran. in ..r the dub-house. The oars of the company run into the Park. The 
monthly commutation rate Is only t&; room and board $8 per week; board 
tor campers *r> per week, tampers and roomers have the same service from 
attendants. Address, MRS. DORA SHANE, Haywards Club House. 



IS YOUR 

TITLE 

PERFECT? 



If vou have any doubt, consult the 

California Title Insurance and Trust Go. 

Insurance policies guaranteeing titles to be 
perfect Issued and abstracts made and con- 
tinued. Money to loan on real estate 
Office— Mills Building. 



C has. Page, Pres.; Howard E. Wricbt, Secretary and Manager. 



July 9, 1898. 



SAN FRANCISCO N i:\VS I.KTTER. 




— 






^upiriER Resorts 




Jbe St. jHelena 3 ai )'tarium. 

Its special features unrlrnlcd and not found elsewhere on the eo 

SCENERY. Located amid grovrs on the western slope of Howell Mountain 
It overlooks the beautiful Napa Valley Id Its most churmitu: 
Premises include sixty acres of well-kept lawns, beautiful 
extensive groves of pine, llvcoak. madrona. Lharmine wal 
EQUIP MEN '. BulldiDps consist of a malo Dve-story s true tun.', the 'Net* 
Cot t ago," and tea other wcll-cqulpped buildings, including cottages gym- 
nasium, chape), laboratories, natatorium. besides thirty tents Well fur- 
nished, steam heawd. electric calls, .-levator, complete scieot'Qc appara- 
us. Every accompanimert of a well-conducted iDstliutlonof Its kind. 

SERVICE. Three regular physicians, thirty trained nurses, forty assist- 
ant: sumptuous and classified dietaries; skilled operators for application 
of massage. Swedish movements, and all kinds o' electric and water 
t realm nt. Infectious and offensive patients not received. 

Address. ST. HELENA SANITARIUM, St. Helena. Cal. 



^dams Sprigs. 




LAKE COUNTY. 

Best Wafer in the World for STOM- 
ACH. LIVER, and KIDNEY 
TROUBLtS. 

Long Distance Telephone. 
Take Southern Pacific R. R., 
foot of Market street. Round 
Trip Tickets, $ 0. 
For further particulars, address 
Dr. W. R. Prathek, Prop. 



^ei^ler Springs, 



-LAKE COUNTY, CAL, 

This delightful wateringiplace is located in the midst of the Coast Kange. 
/*bur?dai?ee of /T\iperal Springs. 

Hot and cold plunge baths, large swimming tank of mineral water, Hoe 
stone dining room; telephone connections, electric lights, livery accom- 
modation; good trout fishing aod hunting, Round trip tickets at Southern 
Pacific offices, $10. 

Jor.* Spauldino, Proprietor 

J Wallace Spaulding, Manager. 



/Anderson Sprigs. 






Only natural Mineral Steam Baths in 

LAKE COUNTY. 



- - 1 --; >.-,'■ ~/' 



Hot Sulphm and Iron Baths. 
Board : $8 to $14 per week. Baths Free. / ddress, 
J. Andeeson, Anderson Springs, 

Middletown, Lake County, Cal. 
Fare, San Francisco to Springs and return re- 
duced to $8. Send for circular. 

j8S" /ull particulars at "Traveler," 20 Montgomery St., S. F. 

*s— LAKE COUNTY, CAL. 

BEST PLACE IN CALIFORNIA FOR HEALTH OR PLEASURE, 

Thirty of the greatest mineral springs in America; all kinds of amuse- 
ments; jew swimming tank, baths and bowling alley. Firsi-class accom- 
modations; rates reasonable; write for illustrated pamphlets. 

San Francisco office, 316 Montgomery street. 
Address, Highland Sr rings, Cal. 




J-lot Sulphur aijd 
Irot) Sprir^s. 



LAKE CO., CAL. 



Most accessible and most desirable. 
Stage daily from Callstoga to Springs. Round trip 
tickets at Southern Pacific Office. 88. Fine hunting 
and fishing. 

Absolutely wonderful waters ; all kinds of skin dis- 
eases cured in marvelously short time; kidney, 
liver, and stomach troubles immediately relieved; 
rates $10 to $18 per week. Long Distance telephone. 



Address, 



J. A HAYS, Proprietor, 

Lake County, Cal. 



J-iOtel Ber/uenue, 



LAKE PORT, CAL. 




paraiso 



LAKEPORT'S LEADING SUMMER RESORT. 

Situated overlooking the shore on Clear Lake. Hotel and grounds 
covor two full blocks; special facilities for accommodating families with 
children; well furnished cottages for those who desire them; home cook- 
ing, boating, bathing, hunting, and superior fishing; no Chinese employed. 

FRANK & A. M. SCALES, Proprietors. 



QlenbrooK, lake co.. cal 

REMEMBER-If you want to hunt; If you want 
to fish; If you want to recuperate; if you want 
the best of recreation; if you want pure air and 
sunshine; ifyouwantto enjoy an exhilarating 
climate, COME TO GLENBROOK 

O. W. R. Tredway, Prop. Glenbrook Hotel. 



JJot MONTEREY COUNTY, CAL. 

Sprip^s. Tne Carlsbad of America. 

For health, rest, pleasure, ollmate. accommodations scenery, Sower 
beds cleanliness, table, not soda tub and plunge baths, hot sulphur tub and 
swimming tanks, massage treatment, special bath houses for ladies and 
lady attendant, hunting and fishing, children's playground, croquet, lawn 
tennis, and dance hall. > or families Paraiso stands unsurpassed in the 
State. Plenty of enjoyment for young and old. Take train at Third and 
Townsend streets, San Francisco, 9 a. m.. and at Oakland from First and 
Broadway at 9:10 a. m. daily for Soledad. Return trip ticket 18, to be pro- 
cured at the Southern Pacific office, 613 Market street, under Grand Hotel. 
Seven miles by stage. Telephone and post office 

For illustrated pamphlets and special inducements for 1898, address 
R. ROBERTSON, Lessee and Manager. 

lJ A ,.. — « J C -. _:_>*.» picturesquely situated 1 amidst the pine 
MOU/drd SPriDOS, forests of Lake County— the Switzer- 
/ •( * 5 land of America- elevation 3300 feet. 

No fog; climate perfect Natural hot 
mineral plunge and tub baths, fine medici- 
nal drinking water. Excellent fishing and 
hunting. Post office and telephone on the 
premises. Rates, $10 and $12 with special 
terms for families Accommodations, 
table and service first-class. Round trip 
from San Francisco via Napa, Calistoga, 
$10, including fine stage drive. 

For accommodations and further particu- 
lars address 

Mrs. R. J Bbeby, Prop., Putah P.O. 




Qarlsbad. 



MOST BEAUTIFUL SPOT IN LAKE COUNTY. 



The mineral springs are well known for marvelous cures when every- 
thing else failed, especially In cases of stomach, liver, kidney and bladder 
affections. Good bathing; new hotel; superior accommodations; $8 to $10 
per week; roads excellent; good trout fishing and deer hunting on prop- 
erty. For particulars write W. R. McGOVERN, Carlsbad, Lake County. 



rJ^k. /%*-**' /* RESORT. Pleasantly located in 
flODCrO S a pine forest three thousand five 
' ^ s hundred feet altitude ; highest 

elevation, lowest price. First-class family table and 
pleasant rooms, seven to eight dollars per week; 
surrounding scenery unsurpassed by any springs In 
the immediate vioinity. Stage daily. Buy ticket 
direct for Hoberg's, Lake County, Cal. 

George Kammerer, 
Mrs. M. Hoberg, 

Proprietors. 



Pnnari7a Cnrinrtc LAKE COUNTY, CAL A natural camping 
u>uyai/z,a jy\ ll/yo. ground: 5 different mineral and 2 pure water 
springs. We cater to campers only. Fishing 
and hunting; cottages to rent, $1.50 up per week; pure water piped to each 
cottage- Hot and Cold Mineral Baihs. All necessaries can be purchased 
on the grounds; hammocks, swings, ana croquet; summer houses in shady 




groves. 



R. F. Dockery, M. D. Dockery, Proprietors. Putah P. O. 



Jffentlworth Si 



nn. 



A New and Strict/ y First-Class Hotel. 

Steam heat, eleotrio lights, and running water in every room; billiards, 
croquet, tennis, and shuffle -board. Saturday night hops; one hour from 
San Francisco ; in beautiful Mill Valley ; 'bus to and from trains. 

W. E. VEAZIE, Proprietor, Mill Valley, Marin County, Cal. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 9. 1898. 



^Sat&fffL J&i/fEtf 



Editor News Letter:— Your issue of the 

The Garden 18th iost. to hacd, was forwarded to me 

Valley Mine, by a friend. 

With regard to this mine (Garden Val- 
ley), though I do not uphold the policy pursued with re- 
gard to the mill, yet under the circumstances I think (from 
the Directors' standpoint, at any rate) I be right thing 
was done. I enclose for your perusal J. J. Lonergan's re- 
port upon which the mine was sold. This report you will 
see advocates the erection of a 4(1 stamp mill. The 
directors considered it would be safe to erect a 10-stamp 
mill. To be still more conservative, I urged delaying the 
erection of any mill until I had access into the mine to see 
for myself. Apparently I was considered unnecessarily 
cautious, and the delay could not be tolerated. Wt ileitis 
gratifying to see failures of this kind brought to public 
notice, I think that in this case you ignore the real cul- 
prits, viz., J. J. Lonergan & Co., of Los Angeles. 

Following are a few extracts from Lonergan's private 
letters to the promoters in Chester: 

"I will endeavor to discuss with you a good business 
method of carrying on the development of your recent 
purchase, the Esperanza mine. The fact of its being a 
good property, if managed right, I can only reiterate 
what I have said in the past. That in my opinion there 
are few better mining properties on the Mother Lode. 
But it must be handled right, every economy must be 
studied, every detail looked well after. 

"In high-grade ore you can lose a dollar here and there 
and not miss it. but in such low-grade propositions you 
must study every detail. This need not discourage you, 
as you have only to consider the mining bu;-inc ss all over 
the world, and you will see that it is the low-grade ore 
that pays the best dividends. 

'•The opinions I render to you here in this matter are 
prompted by a good, friendly feeling, and a desire to see 
you succeed in this enterprise, but I shall not attempt to 
disguise a certain selfish motive which moves me in this 
matter, and that motive is to see the Esperanza mine bear 
out all that I have said in its favor, and thereby win a 
name for myself in England, first for integrity, then for 
good mining judgment." 

Now, sir, it is beyond any human scope of imagination 
to conceive the mental makeup of a man who would make 
such statements and a report such as he made and swore 
to, knowing, as he must have known, that the average 
assay value of the ore was not over one dollar per ton. 

The letter of which the above are extracts (many 
others in the same strain), was as a whole a cunning pro- 
duction (cunning as the devil), calculated to hurry the sale 
cf the mine. 

You will no doubt admit that without a certain amount 
of mutual confidence business would be well nigh impossible. 

Our deplorable failure was due to the confidence reposed 
in J. J. Lonergan by our directors as an expert and a man 
of integrity, inspired as it was by the endorsement of sev- 
eral leading men of Los Anireles. 

In fairness to the directors, be it said that an investiga- 
tion into the affairs had been granted, when I conclusively 
proved to their satisfaction, or rather dissatisfaction, that 
the mine bad been criminally misrepresented by J. J. Lon 
ergan, and that they had been the victims of the vilest 
kind of betrayal. 

I think that for the benefit of bona-fidt mining investors, 
and the public generally, such rascality should be exposed 
through the medium of the press, as it may save other 
people from falling into the same unscrupulous hands. 

Yours faithfully, 

Edward Ashton. 
Garden Valley, El Dorado Co., Qal., Jum 29, ! 

The Lonergan report in evidence speaks 
Lonergan's Oro for itself, and the imprints it bears 
Reserves. would suggest considerable caution to 
the reader versed in mining. They cer- 
tainly would not accept it as a final test of the merits of a 
property. It is a little too slick. " The Esperanza (old 



name of Garden Valley) is a true fissure vein on the 
Mother Lode." he savs. " Vein matter is mostly quartz 
stratified with a solicioua slate, the hanging wall slate, 
foot wall greet stone, or. to use a provincial term, diorite. 
There is a gouge on both the hanging and foot walls. The 
ledge runs the entire length of the claim. To those un- 
familiar with the Mother Lode of California I can briefly 
explain here that it stands in the light of a trunk line or 
ledge to all other ledges or chutes of ore. It is directly 
and distinctly traceable for a distance of 120 miles, having 
the same nature in characteristics in regard to quality 
of ore, walls, trend, etc., the entire distance." This is a 
prelude to the old, old story about the Utica and other 
mines which have proved valuable, and which are, in 
nearly every instance, as far apart as the winning num- 
bers in a lottery. One of the characteristics, and the 
leading one, according to Mr. Lonergan, of this "trunk- 
line," is that "the ^edge becomes wider as depth is at- 
tained. In summing up the situation at the Garden Val- 
ley for the Chester purchases, the report says, after re- 
commending the purchase of a 40-stamp mill: " I have 
estimated that there are 185,000 tons of ore in sight; also 
that this ore can be mined and milled for $1.75 per ton, 
which, with reasonably good management, is without doubt 
the maximum expense, but, in order to be still more con- 
servative, we will call that expense $2 per ton. As ore 
averages $6.37 per ton after deducting the cost of mining 
ana milling ($2), it would leave a net profit of $4.37 per 
ton, which, for 185,000 tons of ore in sight, would show a 
net value of $808 450. Deducting cost of machinery neces- 
sary to put the mine on a paying basis, estimated at $50,- 
DOO, would leave a net-profit of $758,450." If the Chester 
people bought the property on the strength of these 
statements, which are sworn to before the British vice- 
Consul at Los Angeles, and rest satisfied on their exam- 
ination that the mine can produce only some $1 ore, they 
should simply take legal proceedings against Lonergan 
and his associates, and press the case for all it is worth. 

It is laughable to read an article in a 

A Bray From London contemporary, complaining of the 

Babylon. custom now prevalent of decrying gold 

mining shares as an investment, when it 
is remembered that the same sheet was the first to launch 
the Munchausen yarn about the mountain of gold ore 
owned by that infamous absurdily, the Great Northern 
Gold & Industrial Company, L ; mited. It was quite ready 
to accept money to father this rascally conception. Had 
it succeeded to the degree of thievery which its promoters 
expected to attain, this modern Uriah Heap in an editorial 
capacity would have had an opportunity to groan in spirit 
over the tribulations of investers which brought grist to 
his mill. Perhaps, however, judging from the asinine 
character of the article, which suggests this line of 
ihought, the unfortunate, maybe, should be pitied instead 
01 blamed, being more of an ignoramus than knave. If all 
gold mines were of the same description as this Great 
Northern wildcat scheme, so strongly vouched for by this 
London financial humbug, it would be safe to decry such 
investments as extremely precarious. 

The Morning Call of this city has fol- 
The Latest lowed up the exposure of the salting of 
Salting Scandal, the property of the Mountain Mines 
Company, of London, in Sierra County, 
and on Sunday last ran a very full account of this glaring 
piece of rascality. It will be expected that the London 
directors will be prompt to detect the culprit who has 
earned for their concern a notoriety which is most dis- 
graceful. 

A telegram from Sydney announces 

increased Yield of that the gold yield of New South 

Australian Gold. Wales for May amounted to 20,925 

oz , showing an increase over April 

of no less than 8,033 oz, which is at the surprising rate 

of 62.31 per cent. The amount is very nearly double the 

monthly average of the past eleven months, the total 

yield for that period being 110,347 oz. 

At the general Court held recently at the 

The Bank Of Bank of England, Mr. Hugh Colin Smith, 

England. the late Goverror, and Mr. Samuel Steuart 

Gladstone, the late Deputy-Governor, 
were re-elected Governor and Deputy-Governor of the 
Bank, respectively, for the ensuing year. 



July 9 1S0H 



SAN FRANCISCO m:\vs T.I'.TTKR. 




" Hemrthe Crier:" "Whu ihc devil art tbour 
"Onetbtl will ol»T (bedevil. sir. wllb you ' 

THIS super-sensitive patriotic business is petting to be 
a trifle wearisome. There is a certain plate in town 
where people resort after the theatre to sit down quietly. 
rest their nerves, drink beer, and calm their troubled 
minds after witnessing the plays now presented at our 
theatres. Then what happens? No sooner does a man 
tret into the business of handling stringy Welch rarebit 
or swallowing beer, than the German band plays a wild 
tune and then drops into the National Anthem — and Welch 
rarebit is forgotten, the beer grows flat, and the whole 
hall is lustily howliDg. This is a cheap clap-trap sort of 
patriotism. And last Saturday the chief howler and most 
patriotic soul in that cellar was a member of the firm who 
has been supplying those beautiful uniforms to the Ten- 
nessee troops. Ye gods, if howling the National Anthem 
is only a mark of patriotism, then indeed it is to be be- 
lieved that the man who will sensibly sit down amid that 
bustle and keep on eating, is after all the truer patriot. 
He at least has more sense. 

THERE has ever been a fascination 
about a cavalry regiment, and 
when a cavalry regiment is supposed 
to be composed only of dashing blades, 
such as Colonel Morris's of the Pre- 
sidio, then the fascination takes on a 
more pronounced coloring. Roose- 
velt's Rough Riders have had a 
glamour cast about them which at- 
tracted to their ranks some names 
pretty well known on this coast. 
Basil Rie'ietts, who has been 
wounded, belonged to the Rough 
Riders. His was a familiar figure in 
this town — being a friend of Mr. 
Richard M. Tobin — perish the homely 
name of Dick. Ricketts was an all- 
round athlete and somewhat of a 
devil-may-caie fellow, and if the rest 
of the Rough Riders are fashioned on 
Ricketts's plan, then indeed they 
must be a lot of dashing blades. Good 
fellows to keep away fiom— either as 
friends or foes. 

THERE was one man in town who did not watch with 
tearful eyes the departure of the Newport. Through 
some mysterious pull he had fastened on him as thoroughly 
useless a young man as could be possibly found. His friends 
finally came to the conclusion that Manila would be the 
making of him — possibly the undoing — and so they applied 
that he be sent as clerk. The letter of recommendation 
was a caution. There was not a gift which that young 
man did not have — especially virtue ! ! Then the care was 
to keep him sober till the clerical staff started. He has 
gone, and a sigh of relief followed his departure. It is an 
old saying, and a true one, that "clergymen's sons are the 
worst ! " But it was a trifle raw on the part of the father 
to wish it to appear that his son was a patriot, when in 
truth he was being shipped away from home for his coun- 
try's good. 

THE proletariat has arisen in its wrath. It has, meta- 
phorically speaking, gnashed its teeth and foamed at 
the mouth because "our brave boys " have had their uni- 
forms made by the Chinese. It was not so much against the 
miserable stuff that was palmed off on the boys in blue, 
but the fact that Chinamen were patronized. Lo and be- 
hold the absurdity of this cry against the Chinese I Last 
Sunday night Chinatown was a congested mass of white 
people. There were poor white people, rich white people 
and fairly well-to-do white people — and there were many 
white people whose paltry souls and still more paltry 
tongues snarl bitter words at the Chinese, and yet it 
was from the accursed Chinese that these very people 
were buying their fireworks to observe the Natal Day. 





IT is a hideous thing to be a patriot 
and then not have your efforts 
recognized by a ribald press. C< lonol 
Haabe and Colonel Robinson are pat ri- 
ots, and were on the Fourth of July Re- 
gatta Committee. It was through their 
efforts that so splendid an assortment 
of wines, liquors, and eatables were 
donated to the committee. Then Raabe, 
with that foresight for which some 
political gentlemen are noted, put aside 
for private use certain portions of his 
collections. They disappeared! Stout 
little gentlemen, thin little gentlemen, 
smooth-faced little gentlemen, and lean 
and hungry looters were seen all Sun- 
day and Monday walking away with 
rolls of butter, whiskey bottles, tur- 
keys, sardines. Raabe's cache had been 
discovered! "The thrifty Raabe is 
robbed," was the facetious remark of a stout gentleman, 
as he plodded homeward with a cheese under his right 
arm, two rolls of butter in his hip pocket, and a turkey in 
his left hand. Raabe, Raabe, you have been most unmer- 
cifully treated. , 

SWELL-KNOWN gentleman in political, medical, and 
polite circles has been for many weeks anxiously 
awaiting the return of his wife from travel in far and for- 
eign lands. Parenthetically it may be said that the honor- 
able gentleman is not regarded even among "the push" 
as a dresser. He has generally one or two buttons on bis 
waistcoat rubbed bare, but as that is from his kindly habit 
of standing up to a bar and treating all hands to drinks, 
this neglect is generously overlooked. But as it has be- 
fore been remarked, he has been waiting with greedy fond- 
ness for the return of his wife, and he met her at the mole 
as all good and true husbands should. But what was his 
greeting ! As the fond eyes of his wife fell upon his rotund 
figure, she called out in tones of pain and anguish: "My, 
Ed ! What a horrid suit of clothes I Go and order a new 
suit at once." "My dear," replied he, with dignity, "do 
you suppose I can keep you in Paris for a whole year, and 
at the same time buy clothes ? " She remained silent. The 
reproof was crushing. Then she said: "I don't think, 
Edward, that my stay in Paris was so expensive that it 
would not permit you to wear linen cuffs. Throw away 
those celluloid things." Edward is now thinking that for- 
eign travel is rather too broadening. 

THERE is a great heiress in San Francisco ! A girl 
worth barrels and barrels of money, and yet nobody 
seems to know of her presence. She is tall, slight, dresses 
exquisitely, and has been engaged regularly every winter 
to a new man. In summer she also has a new engagement. 
Here is a chance for a San Franciscan. Every man in Los 
Angeles and Pasadena has failed to land the haughty 
beauty, and also the casual tourist from the East has only 
succeeded in getting eDgaged. Now, men of San Fran- 
cisco, step up; don't be bashful. She will accept you, 
keep you engaged for six weeks, and then will sweetly in- 
form you that "papa and mamma are not willing." Other 
information will be supplied free on application. Her in- 
come is set down at $2000 a month, and the happy hubby 
will have to live with papa and mamma in a great rambling 
house in Orange Grove Avenue. 

THERE is a certain gentleman in town who has the 
fire of soldiering burning in his veins and wants a 
commission — and the Governor's ears are being assaulted 
with pleas to place this good young man in the army. He 
knows nothing of war, it is true, and he is not at all fitted 
for a soldier, but bless you, if the Philippines are going 
to be held, there are great opportunities of trade, and our 
patriot wants to go down as an officer, and also as the 
accredited agent of a manufacturing firm. While not at- 
tending to his military duties our lusty officer with sword 
at thigh and revolver in belt, will flit gaily from house to 
house in the fair town of Manila, and get orders for cor- 
sets! He has been informed, has this ambitious soldier, 
that the fair Manilanese don't wear corsets! He is going 
to introduce them! Ah, blessed are the fruits of conquests 
— and corsets ! A corset seller and a soldier ! ! 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 9, 1898. 



BANKING. 



THETENEMENTOF MANYGHOSTS 



r* ■ c o ■♦• >, rnliimhio f S E. cor. Bush and Sansome Sts. 
Bank Of BntlSn GOllimDia. \ incorp'ted by Royal Charter, 186a. 

Capital Paid Up 13,000,000 Reserve Fund I 600,000 

HEAD OFFICE. 80 Lombard Street, London 

HuANrnen— Victoria. Vancouver, New Westminster, Kamloops, Nan - 
lamo Son, Saidon, and Kaslo. British Columbia; Portland, Oregon. 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened sub- 
ject to Check, and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted 
available in all parts ot the world. Approved Bills discounted and ad- 
vances mad e on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates 
upon its Head Ofnce and Branches, and upon Its Agents, as follows : 

New YORK-Merchants' Bankof Canada; CHlCAGO-FirstNalonal Bank 
LivERPOOl^North and South Wales Bank; SCOTLAND-Brltlst 1 Linen 
Company; IRELANO-Bank ol Ireland; MEXico-London Bankof Mexico, 
Son™ America— London Bank of Mexico and South America; China and 
JAP^N-Char ered Bank of India, Australia and China; Acstraija and 
Nw Z^tlAND-Bank of Australasia and Commercial Banking Company 01 
Sydney Ld; demekara and Trinidad (West Indlesl-ColonialBank. 

Also on Dawson City. Yukon District, arrangements having been made 
wllh the Canadian Hank of Commerce whereby It Is prepared to issue 
drafts and Letters of Credit on that Bank at above point, and transact 
other banking business. Terms upon application. 

Bank ot California, San Francisco. 

Capital and Surplus, 18,000.000 

President I CHARLES R. BISHOP.. Vlce-Pres't 

..Secretary THOMAS BROWN Cashier 

Ass't Cashier 1 1. F. Moclton 2d Ass't Cashier 

CORRESPONDENTS. 
N«w YOBK-Messra. Laldlaw 4 Co.: the Bank ot New York, N. B A. 
BAi/riMoKE-Thc National Exchange Bank Boston— The Tremont Na- 
tional Bank; CnicACO— Illinois Trust and Savings Bank; Union National 
Bank Philadelphia— Philadelphia National Bank. St. Louis— Boat- 
man's Bank. ViROiNiA City (Nev.)-Agency of The Bank of California 
London— Messrs. N. M. Rothschild & Sons; Paris— Messrs. de Roths- 
child Freres BEHLiN—Dtreetlon der Disconto Gesellschaft. China, 
Japan and East INDiES-Chartered Bank ot India. Australia and China. 
AD8TRALIA and New Zealand— The Union Bank ol Australia, Ltd., and 
Bank of New Zealand. 
Letters ot Credit Issued available In all parts ot the world. 

The San Francisco National Bank, 

Southeast Corner ot Pine and Sansome streets, S. P. 
Jas K Wilson. President. E A. Brcgciekb, Vice-President. 

Lewis I. Cowgill, Cashier. P. W. Wolpe, Assistant Cashier. 

Capital 1500,000 

Directors: Jas. K. Wilson. D. J. Staples, Wm Pierce Johnson, Geo. 
A. Pope. E A. Bruguiere. Ed. G. Lukens. Charles C. Judson. 

Agents: New York— Hanover National Bank. Chase National Bank; 
Boston— National Bank of the Commonwealth. Philadelphia— Drexel & 
Co. Chicago— Continental National Bank. St. Louis— The Mechanics' 
Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. London— Brown Shipley & 
Co. Paris— Morgan, Harjes & Co. 



WILLIAM ALVORD 
ALLEN M.CLAY.... 
S. Prentiss Smith. . , 



San Francisco Savings Union. 



532 California Street. 

Deposits. Jan. 1, 1898 fcS.733.U0 

Pald-UpCapltal and Surplus 1,651 917 

E B. POND, President W. C. B. De FREMERY, Vice-President 

LOVELL WHITE, Cashier. 
Directors: George W Beaver. W. A Masree, Albert Miller. Robert Watt, 
George C. Boardman, Daniel E. Martin, George Tasbelra, E. B. Pond. 

Loans upon San Francisco and Oakland Real Estate, and Farms and 
Farming Lands in the Country. 

Receives Deposits. Country remittances may be made in checks payable 
in San Francisco. Post Office or Wells Fargo & Co 's Money Orders, or coin 
by Express, but the responsibility of this bank commences only with the 
receipt c( the money. 
No charge is made for pass-book or entrance fee. 

Office Hours : 9 a. m. to 3 p. m , and Saturday evenings, for receipt of de- 
posits only. 6:30 to 8 o'clock. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San FrancisGO. 

38 Post Street, below Kearnt. Mechanics' Institute Building 

Guaranteed Capital 11,000,000 Pald-Up Capital 1300,000 

JAMES D. PHELAN. President. S. G. MURPHY, Vice-President. 
GEO. A. STORY. Cashier JOHN A. HOOPER, Vice-President. 

C. B. HOBSON, Assistant Cashier. 

Directors— James D. Phelan, L. P. Drexler, John A. Hooper, C. G. 
Hooker, James Moffltt, S. G. Murphy, Frank J. Sullivan, Robert McElroy, 
and Joseph D. Grant. 

Interest paid on Deposits. Loans on approved securities. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order, Wells, Fargo & Co. , or Exchange 
on City Banks. When opening accounts send signatui e . 



SWiSS American Bank OILOCARNO. Switzerland, and 

Germania Trust Go. of San Francisco |?re*°°s g F mer5 

Paid-up Capital and Reserves, $620,000. 
^,000) 
A general savings and commercial banking business transacted. Inter 
est paid on savings deposits. Loans on approved real estate security, and 
on oommerolftl pftpor. 

DIRECTORS— Ernst A. Denlcke, A. Sbarboro. J. C. Rued, E. Martlnonl 
F. C. Siebe, A. Tognazzint, H Brunner, McD R. Venable. A. G. Wieland 
F. Krooenberg. Charles Martin, C ichret. P. Tognazzini, S. Grandi. 



Crocker- Woolworth National Bank oi S. F. 

Corner Market, Montgomery, 

and Post Streets. 

Pald-Up Capital ii ,000.000 

WM. H.CROCKER President 

W. E. BROWN Vice-President 

QEO. W.KLINE Cashier 

Directors— Henry T Scott, E. B. Pond. Hy. J.Crocker, Geo W. Scott 



ftLMOST at the end of the tangent that Bleeeker street 
makes, as it turns northward, there was a fine, old 
brick house. It was built, I daresay, in the days when 
upper Broadway was a country road and the Vauxball 
Gardens were the resort of the gentry on summer nights, 
when there were fireworks and the band played. In its 
time it was a mansion, showing a broad, bluff front — cot 
straight across, but thrust out in the middle into an obtuse 
angle. The doorway was narrow, but on either side of it 
stood fine, fluted columns, with gimcrack wreaths atop, 
and over the high, narrow windows there was a great deal 
of marvelously intricate stone-scrolling, out of which grin- 
ned impossible, impudent cherubs. 
The dissipated years had their will with the old house. 
On either side great tenement houses — bold and gaudily 
mean — shouldered down on it; time and weather pox- 
marked the bluff house-front; over the windows the great 
shutters flapped, yellowing and broken; there was dust 
in the eyes of the impossible cherubs; the doorway was 
foul with tenement driftwood. 

A year ago the old house was at its worst. Shabby, 
dirty, ragged, with leering windows, it looked like a re- 
spectable old gentleman who bad taken to dram-drinking 
and gone to the dogs. It had broken out in an unhealthy- 
looking rash of sign-boards and posters. On the fluted 
pillars fluttered shabby scraps of paper, "Appartements 
h Louer." The basement had been cut up into little shops, 
where the refuse of the trading world was sold at ridicu- 
lous prices. Blacks and dissolute whites swarmed through 
the doorway and up the stairs. The going up and down 
of feet had worn uneasy hollows in the wooden steps. The 
walnut handrails had been broken off, and the wall was 
blackened by the impress of steadying bands. 
The old house had gone to the dogs. 
It is a sad thing, this going to the dogs of old houses. 
Down, down — reeling down the social scale like drunkards 
— until in the end Doll Tearsheet laughs boldly from the 
window, and Pistol slinks in and out, with Bardolf and 
Pym. 

The old loves ache yet and throb through the old tim- 
bers; the sweet, low voice of the bride, the prattle of chil- 
dren, and the feet of little children running, the song of 
the mother, crooning — the old house remembers. 

A few weeks ago the tenants were driven out of the old 
house. They went sulkily, black and white and yellow, 
and vanished one by one in the tenements east and west. 
And when the last Doll Tearsheet, in draggled tea-gown, 
had traipsed off, cursing, a sallow 
swarm of Italians fell upon the house 
with axe and pick. They hacked 

away the doors and windows and let 

the hot air of the street blow in 

among the ghosts. They battered off 

the chimneys and sliced up the roof; 

then they began to chisel down the 

walls. 
Tbey worked slowly in the Italian 

fashion, stopping now and then to 

■ luarrel and smoke. By the end of 

the first day the top story was open 

to the stars. And each day a story 

was pried off, until the entire front 

was stripped away and the old house 

stood naked to the air. From top to 

bottom it was naked as a worm. 

Only the floors were undisturbed, and 

the partition walls stood as of old. It 

was like looking into the chambers of 

Doll Tearsheet's heart. The hot 

winds blew through the skeleton 

rooms and washed out the foul odors. 

One night a torrent of summer rain 

gushed through the house from attic 

to cellar; it rinsed the dirt-crusted 

walls ai d floors; it was like the final 

washing of the dead. 
A young man sauntered through 

Bleeeker street, with the air of one 




July 9. 1898. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS I.KTTKR. 



».S 



who knows not why he is, nor where He was 
properly booted and gloved: his olotl 
the mode of the eighties. He wo rand 

carried a stick — lightly, as a young (fir ,irries 
a lily. An idle policeman, who was an: 
converse with some one who had more ortho- 
graphy than he had, stopped the man, an 
"Who are you ?" 

" I am not a who." said the man. "I am one 
of Edgar Saltus' inventions; I am Mr. tucou] and 
I am Tristram Varick and I am the old New 
Yorker, and mine"— he took off his 
glasses — "is the face that kills." 

" But you have a beautiful soul," said the 
policeman. 

The man adjusted his eye-glasses and 
sauntered od, until he came to the old house; 
when he saw its desolation he smiled. 
It was the smile of an habitual andmel- 
ancholy philosopher. It was a smile full of epithets. It 
was a smile full of soubrettes and the little clouds Watteau 
painted. It was the smile of a cunning orthographist. It 
was the smile of a beautiful soul. The man looked into the 
old house — for it stood before him open as the street; then 
slowly be climbed the stone steps and entered the drawing 
room. There were marks on the wall where the high, old- 
fashioned mirror had stood. He could trace the pattern 
of the wainscot and higher he saw a welter of arms and 
legs and wings, where the painted Cupids had danced hand 
in hand. He tapped the wall with his walking-stick. Tbe 
ghosts of old kisses fluttered down about him like rose 
leaves; the ghosts of dead laughter trooped round him; be 
beard the frou-frou of women skirts and tbe singing of 
fiddles. He crossed the floor to the fire-place. He rested 
his weight on his right leg and crossed his ankles; then he 
laid bis right arm along the mantlepiece. It was a pose 
Edgar Saltus had invented for him. 

Overhead he heard the noise of the picks and axes, plied 
by the sallow Italians, the noise of the picks and axes and 
the noise of falling bricks and the noise of splitting timbers 
and the noise of riven mortar. He waited. Across the 
yellow shafts of sunlight something fluttered toward him. 
It fluttered like the signature of Whistler, which is a but- 
terfly. When it drew near he thought it was a woman, 
and he fumbled it with his eyes, and said: "Who are you?" 
" I am not a who," she said: "I am one of Edgar Saltus' 
inventions. So are you. So is this house. So is every- 
thing — dear Lord ! " 
The tears washed white runlets down her ruddled cheeks. 
Her lips made one vermillion rime. The face was oval 
and rather small; and though it was beautiful as victory, 
the wonder of her eyes, which looked the haunts of hope 
unfulfilled, the wonder of her mouth, which seemed to 
promise more than mortal mouth could give, were forgot- 
ten in her hair, which was not orange Dor flame, but a 
blending of both. And now as the Bleecker-street cars 
passed, her thin nostrils quivered and her hand rose as a 
bird does and quivered with delight. 

"This is the street," she said, "and this is the house and 
this is the room — the piano stood there." 
He seemed indifferent. 
" It was here we parted," she said. 
"Did I put a dagger into you or did I shoot myself, or 
did you kill me — I have forgotten who I was that time." 
His memory flapped darkly, like a bat. 
The woman lifted her fatidic face; she, too, bad forgot- 
ten which one she was that time. 

***** 

Overhead the sallow Italians swung picks and axes; and 
the walls sank and the ceilings crumbled, and the floors 
rolled away like burned paper. And the ghosts of dead 
kisses and the ghosts of dead laughter, and the ghosts of 
little children running and the ghosts of laughing, sleepy 
women and the ghosts of women weeping and the ghost of 
Doll Tearsheet and ancient Pistol and the ghosts of Edgar 
Saltus' inventions vanished like the curlecues little boys 
cut in the night-air with burning sticks. 

And out of the limy dust of the ruins the rats fled, 
squealing. v. t. 

MOTHBBs.be sure and use "Mrs. Winslow's Soothing Syrup M for your 
children while teething. 




Smokinq Tobacco ## 



When playing poker drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



BANKIN G. 
The Anglo-Galifornian Bank, Limited. 

Capital authorized 16,000,000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 

Paid Up 1,500,000 

Reserve Fund 700,000 

N. E. Cor. Pink and Sansome Sts 
Head Office— 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 

Agents at New York— J. & W. Seligman & Co., 21 Broad street. 

The Bank transacts a General Banking Business, sells drafts, makes 

telegraphic transfers, and Issues letters of credit available throughout the 

world. Sends bill^ 'or collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange 

and bullion. IGN. STEINHART 1 Mana „ firia 

P. N. LILIENTBAL )■ Managers 

The German Savings and Loan Societu. 

No. 526 California Street, San Francisco 
Guarantee capital and surplus — 82,109,000 99 
Capital actually paid up in cash.. 1,000 000 00 

Deposits December 31, 1897 26,369,633 36 

OFFICERS: President, B.A.Becker; First Vice-President, Daniel 
Meyer; Second Vice-President, H, Horstman; Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; 
Assistant Cashier, William Herrmann; Secretary, George Tourny ; Assist- 
ant Secretary, A. H. Muller; Attorney, W. S. Goodfellow. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS: B. A. Becker, Daniel Meyer, H. Horst- 
mann, Ign. Stelnhart, N. Van Bergen, E. Rohte, H. B. Russ, D. N. 
"Walter and N. Ohlandt- 

Wells Fargo & Go. Bank. 

N. E. Corner Sansome & Sutter Streets 

John J. Valentine President 

Homer S.King Manager 

H. Wadsworth Cashier 

F. L>. Lipman Assistant Cashier 

Cash Capital and Surplus 16,250,000 

BRANCHES. 

N. Y. City, H. B. Parsons, Cashier. | Salt Lake City, J. E. Dooly, Cashier 

Portland, Or., R. M. Dooly, Cashier. 

Directors— John J. Valentine, Benj. P. Cheney, Oliver Eldridge, Henry 

E. Huntington, Homer S. King, George E. Gray, John J. McCook, John 

Bermingham, Dudley Evans. 

London, Paris and American Bank, Limited. 

N.W. Cob. Sansome & Sdtteb Sts. 

Subscribed Capital 12,500,000 

Paid Up Capital 12,000,000 

Reserve Fund I 850,000 

Head Office , 40 Threadneedle Street, London, E. c . 

AGENTS — NEW Yobk — Agency of the London, Paris, and American 
Bank Limited, No. 10 Wall Street, N. Y. Pabis— Messrs. Lazard, Preres 
& Cie, 17Boulevard Poissoniere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the 
world. Commercial and Travelers' Credits issued. 

SIG. GREBNEBAUM 1 „.„.„„ 
O. ALTSCHUL J Managers. 

Securitu Savings Bank. 

222 Montgomery St.. Mills Bdildinq. 

INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. 

LOANS MADE. 

DIRECTORS. 
William Alvord S.L.Abbot Jr. H.H.Hewlett 

Wm. Babcock O.D.Baldwin E. J. McCutchen 

Adam Grant W. S. Jones R. H. Pease 

Continental Building & Loan Association ot California. 

Established in 1889. 222 Sansome St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Subscribed Capital, $7,000,000 ProBt and Reserve Fund, 8100,000 

Paid-in Capital - - - 1,000,000 Monthly Income, over - - 75,000 

Dr. Ed. E, Hill, President. Capt. Oliver Eldridge, Vice-President. 
Wm. Corbin, Secretary and General Manager. 



i6 



SAN I' RAN CISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 9 1898. 




GET THE GENUINE ARTICLE ! 

Walter Baker & Cols 

Breakfast 
Cocoa. 



Pure, 

Delicious, 

Nutritious. 

Costs Less than ONE , 
CENT a cup. 

Walter Baker & Co. Limited, 

Established 1780, 



Be sure that the package 
bears our Trade-Mark. 



Dorchester, Mass. 



V, 



U 



CITY INDEX AND PURCHASER'S GUIDE 

RESTAURANTS. 
Maison Tortoni, French Rotlsserle, 111 O'Farrell street. Private dining 

rooms and banquet ball. S. Constantlnl, Proprietor. 
Poodle Dog Restaurant, S. E. cor. Grant ave. and Bush Bt Private 

dining and banquet rooms, Tel. 429. A. B. Blanco & B Brun 
Bay State Oyster House and Grill Room, 15 Stockton street and 106 
O'Farrell street. N. M. Adlec Proprietor. Telephone Maln5057. 

MEDICAL. 
Dr. Hall, 50 McAllister St., near Jones. Diseases of women and children. 

POSTAGE STAMP DEALERS. 
Hawaiian Stamp* a specialty. MAKINS & CO 506 Market street. 
Selections on approval: any place In world. W. F. GREANY,827Brannat 
The W. H. HoMIs Stamp Co., (Incorporated), 105 O'Farrell St.,S.F. 

BOILERMAKERS. 
P. F. Dundon's 8an Francisco Iron Works, 314, 310, and 318 Main street 
Iron Work of every description designed and constructed 



Houses Built to 
Suit Purchaser. 



Most Desirable Location in 



belvedere 



Easy terms on monthly payments. 

Apply, Dr. Byron W. Haines, rooms 16-17, I4;Grant avenue, City. 

H. ISAAG dONtfS. M. D. 

Eye, Ear, Nose, and Throat. 

Office, 222 Post street, between Grant avenue and Stockton Sts., S. F. 
Hours, 10 a. h. to 4 p. m. Sunday by appointment. 

Tel. Grant 101. 

DR. BYRON W. HAINES 



14 Grant Avenue 
Rooms 16-17-18-19 



Dentist 



d. D. SULLIVVAN 

Attorney-at-Law 
Rooms 34-38, 3d Floor Chronicle Building, San Francisco. 




Senorita Montenar, by Archer P. Crouch ; published by Harper & 
Brothers, New York and London. 1898. 

Mr. Crouch has written an excellent tale of adventure, 
the scene of which is laid in Chile during the war of Inde- 
pendence against Spain. lis publication is opportune just 
now when the last of Spain's colonies seem likely to shake 
ofl her yoke, and when the exploits of naval commanders 
are occupying so large a share of the public attention; for 
a leading character of the story is Lord Cochrane, one of 
the most brilliant and daring of British fighters on the 
sea. The hero is John Wildasb, an English officer who 
had been dismissed from the Rojal Navy for striking a 
superior in rank. Being enthusiastically fond of the sea, 
he enters the service of Seiior Martinez, a Valparaiso 
merchant, by whom he is much esteemed. But he is un- 
fortunate enough to get into a quarrel with Luis, son of 
Martinez, and to be challenged to a duel, in which he 
wouuds his antagonist. Seuor Martinez dismisses him 
from his employ, and he is once more at his wits'-end what 
to do. Hearing that the famous British Admiral, Lord 
Cochraue, has become commander-in-chief of the Chilian 
fleet, Wildash offers his services, and is placed in com- 
mand of a war-vessel, with which he captures several 
Spanish merchant-ships and reduces some forts. Having 
landed to make an attack, he is led into an ambuscade and 
taken prisoner. In the castle in which he is confined he 
discovers Senorita Montenar, a beautiful Chilian girl, 
whom he had met and greatly admired in Valparaiso, and 
whom he supposes to be betrothed to Luis Martinez, now 
an officer in the Spanish army. Senorita Montenar en- 
deavors to render Wildash's captivity more bearable, and 
at last assists him to escape from the castle. The Spnor- 
ita with her maid joins Wildash and his faithful henchman, 
Rodrigo, and the four, after encountering many dangers, 
reach Valparaiso in safety. Though the Seiiorita's fam- 
ily are strong adherents of the Spanish cause, her love for 
Wildash turns her into a patriot, and the British officer 
and the Chilian belie are happily united. Mr. Cro'ch's 
style is easy, and the interest of the story is well sus- 
tained. The hero's adventures, while sufficiently numer- 
ous and exciting, are not extravagant. 

There recently came into our hands a handsome sou- 
venir, issued by the management of the Prince of Wales's 
Theatre, London, and entitled " Ln foupin Souven 
opens with a "piece" by Marie Cor- 
elli, entitled "Lu PoupSc: a Social 
Lesson," written in that lady's well- 
known vigorous style, and addressed 
to the male sex generally, and par- 
ticularly to the "good-looking Nojdle 1 
who seeks a Doll, but finds — a 
Woman." To this young man Marie 
Corelli addresses the following re- 
marks: " 'La PoupSts of society, with 
her softly- tinted cheeks, rosy lips, 
curliog hair, and demurely restrained 
demeanor, is not quite such a doll as 
she sometimes looks, dear Noodle ! 
The wavy, fluffy, 'goldi locks' may 
cover a Brain — the dainty silken 
bodice, with its delicate 'froufrou' of 
lace and chiffon, may be fastened over 
a beating heart, full of the strongest 
and most complex emotions; and when . 
you, in your touching and often child- ^Jr 
ish male arrogance, imagine you have 
secured as a wife a 'Doll to order,' 
whose charms and accomplishments you 
considered, approved, and learnt by rote, you may sud- 
denly discover that you have at your side an Enigma in- 
stead—that beautiful, living, breathing, loving, and for- 
ever incomprehensible Sphinx of Life called Woman." 
Now, all this is bright and entertaining enough, 
and shows how completely Miss Corelli is possessed 
by the notion that woman is a riddle to which 
do solution can be found. Yet this is a wholly 



have carefully 




July 9. 1898. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



modern idea, the outgrowth of Cliristiaoity ami Chivalry. 
The ancient Bel mi, regan 

as fickle, inconstant, and fond of change, bat by no means 
as an insoluble Enigma. Incomprehensibility by man's 
finite intelligence being ascribed by the Chri-1 
woman, in her touching feminine arrogance, has boldly laid 
bold of this divine attribute, and asserts that she. like the 
Deity, "passetb all understanding.'' 

" Don't Worry " Noggels, Bits of Ore Gathered from rich Mines, by 
Jeanne it. Penninpion. Published by Fords, Howard .v Hui- 
bert. New York. l»Ov Prion, in flexible cloth, forty cents. 
This is a little collection of short passages from Epicte- 
tus, Emerson, George Eliot, and Robert Browning. The 
compiler's object has been to gather from these eminent 
writers thoughts tending to teach self-reliance, courage, 
and serenity. Miss Pennington thinks that worry and un- 
rest kill far more people than work, and that the best an- 
tidote for these modern poisons is to be found in the works 
of the world's great teachers. She expresses the hope 
that some of the thoughts selected by her may prove sug- 
gestive and helpful, and may lead people to study for them- 
selves the writings from which they are taken. 

There is not likely to be any lack of biographies and ap- 
preciations of Mr. Gladstone. Mr. James Bryce's essay 
on "His Characteristics as Man and Statesman" has al- 
ready been issued by The Century Company, and Mr. Jus- 
tin McCarthy has added several chapters to the new edi- 
tion of "The Story of Gladstone's Life," while Mr. W. T. 
Stead, assisted (it is said) by Madame Novikoff, is en- 
gaged upon a biography, which, while it will not be official, 
will contain a large quantity of valuable material. Some 
time ago it was said that Mr. John Morley had been 
chosen as the biographer and literary executor of Mr. 
Gladstone, and that he already had in his possession many 
of the great statesman's letters and papers. Certainly 
Mr. John Morley's, experience as a legislator and a man 
of letters eminently qualifies him to write the life and 
edit the papers of the Grand Old Man. Then it has been 
said that, encouraged by the remarkable success of Lord 
Tennyson's biography of bis father, one of the members of 
Mr. Gladstone's family will undertake the preparation of 
the authorized Life of the eminent statesman. 

Here is a wonderfully gccd repartee told by Mrs. M. E. 
W. Sherwood in her book of reminiscences "Here, There, 
and Everywhere": The hostess at a dinner in Washington, 
observing her niece talking very vivaciously with Nat P. 
Willis at the other end of the table, sent her a card with 
these words written on it: "Don't flirt so with Mr. Willis." 
As the aunt was herself carrying on a lively and interested 
conversation with a Mr. Campbell, Willis wrote this reply 
on behalf of the niece: 

" Dear aunt, don't attempt my young feelings to trammel, 
Nor strain at a Nat, while you swallow a Campbell." 

Professor Gayley, of the University of California, is now 
in England, engaged in editing fortheMacmillan Company 
a series of "Representative English Comedies." The 
series will contain about forty plays, and will occupy five 
octavo volumes of about 650 pages each. The first play 
in the series will be " Heywood's Interludes," and the last 
will be "The School for Scandal." 

It is said that Mr. Gelett Burgess, one of the founders 
of The Lark, after spending a year in New York, has de- 
cided to join the already large colony of American writers 
in London. 



Ins it Upon Having Your Ticket to New York, Boston, or 

Other Eastern Cities 
Eead over the Nickel Plate (N. Y. C. & St. L. R. E.), the popular 
low-rate short line. Quick time, unexcelled accommodations, and 
no extra fares charged. Jay W. Adams, Pacific Coast Passenger 
Agent, 37 Crocker Building, San Francisco., Cal. 

Distributing brings results, and results are what every advertiser 
wants. I distribute circulars, booklets, and all kinds of advertising, 
matter in San Francisco, Oakland, Alameda, and Berkeley. Esti- 
mates as to cost ol covering this territory gladly given. Good work 
guaranteed. Wm. M. Weil, 106 Pine street, San Francisco. Tele- 
phone Main 678. 

Kick if you don't get pure Jackson's Napa Soda. 



1898 Bicycles Down to $5.00. 









i you wilt cut thin i 

' ilu'lr 
e uii.i full partli 



Government of Western Australia. 
Coolgardie Water Supply. 

RIVETTED STEEL PIPES. 

The Government of Western Australia Is prepared to receive 
tenders for tin- supply ;md delivery In Western Australia of aboul 

246 Miles of Rivetted Steel Pipes 

of about 31 inches internal diameter. 

Form of tender, with Drawings, Specification, and Conditions of 
Contract annexed, may be obtained on payment of a fee of Two 
Guineas, in Europe at the office of the Agent-General for Western 
Australia, 15 Victoria street, Westminster, London, S.W. ; in 
America, at the office of Messrs. Seward Guthrie & Steele, 40 
Wall street. New York; and In Western Australia, at the office 
of the Honorable the Director of Public Works, Perth. 
Tenders sealed and endorsed "Tender for Rivetted Steel Pipes" 
are to be delivered addressed, either to Agent-General ai the 
office aforesaid, or to the Honorable the Director of Public Works 
at Perth, Western Australia, on or before 12 noon on 

Tuesday, the 23d day of August next. 

No tender will be considered unless on the prescribed form with- 
out being detached from the Specification and Conditions of Con- 
tract. 

The Government does not bind itself to accept the lowest or any 
tender. 
By order of the Honorable the Director of Publlo Works, 

C. Y. O'CONNOR, Engiueer-in-Chief. 
Public Works Office, PERTH, Western Australia, 20th May, 1898 



Government of Western Australia. 
Coolgardie Water Supply. 

WELDED STEEL PIPES. 

The Government of Western Australia is prepared to receive 
tenders for the supply and delivery in Western Australia of about 

82 fliles of Welded Steel Pipes 

of from 26 to 29 inches internal diameter. 

Form of Tender with Drawings, Specification, and Conditions of 
Contract annexed, may be obtained on payment of a fee of Two 
Guineas in Europe at the office of the Agent-General for Western 
Australia, 15 Victoria street, Westminster, London, S.W. ; in 
America, at the office of Messrs. Seward Guthrie & Steele, 40 
Wall street, New York; and in Western Australia, at the office 
of the Honorable the Director of Public Works, Perth. 
Tenders sealed and endorsed "Tender for Welded Steel Pipes" 
are to be delivered addressed, ei'her to the Agent-General at his 
office aforesaid, or to the Honorable the Director of Public Works 
at Perth, Western Australia, on or before 12 noon, on 

Tuesday, the 23d Day of August next. 

No tender will be considered unless on the prescribed form with- 
out being detached from the Specification and Conditions of 
Contract. 

The Government does not bind itself to accept the lowest or any 
tender. 
By order of the Honorable the Director of Public Works, 

C. Y. O'CONNOR, Engineer-in-Chief. 
■Public Works Office, PERTH, Western Australia, 20th May, 1898. 

Joseoti Gillott's Steel Fens, 

Gold Medals. Paris. 1878-1889 These pens are " the 
best In the world." Sole agent for the United States. 
Mb. Henry Hoe. 91 John street, New York. 
Sold by all Stationers . 




As a table water is unsurpassed. 
— London Hospital Gazette. 



i8 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 9, 1898 




LORD BEACONSFIELDdescribesacritieas "a writer 
who has failed in authorship." A corresponding 
identification may be truthfully made concerning the cark- 
ing, carping critic in art. A connoisseur of this kidney 
was being shown through Solly Walter's studio by a friend 
of the artist, Solly being away on a holiday excursion. 
During his absence, studio and pictures had acquired an 
appearance of neglect, frames had become coated with 
dust and evidences of the proverbial diligence of the spider 
were not lacking. 

It is not necessary to tell anyone who knows anything 
that Solly's pictures have real merit,— apart from the in- 
spiration of absinthe frappe. But the amateur critic 
could not perceive these excellencies and roundly did he 
abuse the best efforts of his absent host. 

In the shadow of a rather darkened corner hung a little 
sketch in which the artist had not unsuccessfully held the 
mirror up to nature. This modest effort received its 
share of the critic's attention. 

"Poor Solly!" he exclaimed, with fine scorn. "See, he 
has tried to paint a spider and his web! That clumsy 
mat a spider's web, and that a spider! It looks like a 
crow?" 

Just then the provoking insect, appalled by the ferocity 
of the attack, hid in a joint of the easel. 

It was a live spider and a real web! 

* * * 

A brace of Mormon elders have recently been carrying 
on a mission in Los Angeles County. In a locality where 
the residents are very orthodox, according to the New 
England standard, these Utah missionaries obtained the 
use of a school-house for their meeting by calling them- 
selves "Latter Day Saints," which sounded very evangel- 
ical in the ears of the good protestants of the section. 

At the meeting, one of the elders declaimed very 
fervently on the unity of the faith, maintaining that there 
is only one right religious way, — of course, Brigham 
Young's way, — and nailing his argument by quoting verv 
frequently the Biblical text, "One Lord, one faith, one 
baptism." 

Then the speaker invited remarks or questions from any 
one present, with a view of clinching bis proselyting ex- 
pedition. 

A sweet-faced old lady arose, but completely spoiled the 
effect of the Mormon's oration by remarking, demurely: 

"There are, no doubt, three New Testament units,— 
one Lord, one faith, one baptism. But there is also a 
fourth, — one wife." 

# * * 

A drill sergeant in an Idaho regiment, who had con- 
tracted a severe cold while tenting at Camp Merritt, was 
bothered by a troublesome cough as he was drilling an 
awkward squad of recruits. Every time he attempted to 
give an order, his voice broke into a ridiculous fit of 
"wheezing," which afforded amusement alike to spectators 
and recruits and was quite destructive to discipline. 

Perceiving his plight, a non-commissioned officer from 
another company told the drill sergeant that troches 
would afford him relief. 

" I happeu to have some with me," added the corporal, 
kindly, handing over a sample. "Just try this one." 

The sergeant gratefully accepted the proffered tablet, 
hastily put it in his mouth, without examining it, and 
followed the directions to "allow it to dissolve slowly." 

As soon as the drill was over, the sergeant sought out 
the corporal and ungratefully began to pummel his bene- 
factor. 

"Take that,— and that,— and that for your troche," he 
cried in a rage, to the amazement of the entire company. 

The supposed troche was a brown button from the 
trousers of the donor. 




Resplendent in bis new uniform as 
Captain of Company C, Eighth Regi- 
ment of California Volunteer Infantry, 
District Attorney William S. Barnes 
was parading the street one day last 
week, in heavy marching order. A 
squad of urchins, whose ages ranged 
from five to nine, rather seedv in ap- 
pearance but equipped in a very fair 
imitation of infantrymen, with white 
stripes sewed on their ragged over- 
alls, wooden guns and several kettle 
drums which produced a well sus- 
tained tattoo, was marching in the 
opposite direction. 

When the two military forces met, 
the kids formed in two lines on the 
sidewalk, and presented "arms" as 
the corpulent captain marched 
through. Rising to the occasion, 
with rare tact, to the infinite delight 
of the youngsters, Captain Barnes 
performed this simple evolution with 
bared head. Then he solemnly bowed 
and resumed his cap. 

The urchins cheered until the huge infantryman was lost 
to view, and then, in his honor as well as in partial imita- 
tion of a well known religio-military organization,, they re- 
named their juvenile army, "The Barnes Brigade." 

* # * 

Flushed with the pride of wealth which the receipt of 
the monthly remuneration of thirteen dollars gives to a 
private in the army of the United States, half-a-dozen 
soldiers, last Saturday night, squandered most of the pay 
which they had just received, over the bars of some grog- 
geries on Pine street, near Dupont. When they could 
drink no more, the last car having long since departed, 
the soldiers rang for carriages. In response to the sum- 
mons, two rickety old vehicles lumbered heavily up the 
hill. 

"Where are the other hacks?" demanded a soldier, 
sternly. 

"Why," said one of the cab drivers, who was somewhat 
dubious of his fare, "here are two carriages, and there are 
only six of you. We can easily carry you." 

"Two carriages!" repeated the man of war, disdainfully. 
"Why, we want one apiece!" 

* # * 

It was the day of one of the peiiodical 
"drawings," and John Fouga, the United 
States Commissioner, went to several offices 
in the Appraisers' Building, and, by way of a 
joke, offered to sell a half-interest in his 
twenty-five cent ticket for ten cents. Fcuga 
had not seen the list o'. the winning numbers, 
but when he went into the office of Southard 
Hoffman, Clerk of the United States District 
Court, that official gave to his naive proposi- 
tion a more peremptory refusal than any be 
had received. 

"Ten cents!" he repeated, with some 
vehemence. "I wouldn't give you a cancelled 
postage stamp for the whole of your ticket. 
The whole scheme is etc., etc." 

Colonel Hoffman had previously perused the list, and. 
had then destroyed a little slip which he had been carefully 
cherishing. 

A little later in the day, Fouga himself read over the 
list of the drawing, and found that his despised ticket had 
won fifty dollars. Then he returned to Hoffman's office. 

"Just notice this number," Fouga remarked quietly. 

"Are you back again with that same confounded 
ticket?" demanded Hoffman, wrathfully. 

" I want you to observe the number," persisted the 
lucky man, writing the figures on a large sheet of paper. 

Then he retreated to the door, tossed Hoffman a copy 
of the list, and grinned, irritatingly, until Hoffman made 
the desired discovery. 

Fouga is now careful to remain at the other end of the 
building. 




July 9, 1898. 



SAN I KANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



'9 



/ 



fc 



«®.m** 



A weil-known lawyer, who has recently 
>rth into martial poetry he can be 
identified as e.\Judp;e Robert Perral, awoke 
the other day, after a jolly evening spent 
with a set of his convivial brethren, following 
an elaborate dinner, and his morning symp- 
toms were decidedly unpleasant. 

He was at a loss to account for his rickety 
nerves until he chanced to remember tliat in 
the course of the dinner he had devoured a 
roasted potato. This recollection completely 
satisfied his mind, and a little later he was 
crawling sadly up the steps of the City Hall, 
with parched tongue and aching head. 

"What's the matter, Judge?" solicitously 
inquired Judge Belcher, overtaking the invalid. 

"It was a confounded potato I ate last night," artlessly 
explained Judge Ferral, readily and confidently. 

"Too bad," remarked Judge Belcher, in a sympathizing 
tone. "If I were you," he added, slyly. "I would swear 
off — on potatoes." 




"real ladies." Brigadier-General Otis was obliv- 
ious of the fact that the gentle jog of his family stcod was 
a nunc rapid speed than the inarching troops could main- 
tain throughout a route five miles long. The space 
between the General and his brigade steadily widened. 
the procession suggested two armies, — one compris- 
ing the lighting editor and his personal staff; the other 
composed of the remaining four regiments. 

One of the Los Angeles aids spurred his horse alongside 
his chief, and, saluting, suggested that they were along 
way ahead of the rest of the troops. 

" Behind, are they?" retorted the old General, without 
slacking his speed. "Then let them catch up to us!" 

Moore's Poison Oak Remedy. 
Cures poison oak and all skin diseases. Sold by all druggists. 

roooHERTY's Shorthand-Typewriting School. Day and evening classes 
W per month. Typewriting neatly done, reasonable. SupremeCourt Build- 
tog. Larkin 9t'reet, opposite City Hall. 

Wedding and Birthday Presents. Magnificent assortment 
splect from at the art store of S. & G. Gump, 113 Geary street. 



In 



Patriots everyone of them, — one 
hundred and fifty in a bunch, — and 
last Sunday they very appropriately 
went down to the sea in a ship, yclept 
the Chilkat. The aggregation of 
heroes comprised the Executive Com- 
mittee of the Fourth of July cele- 
brants, and a few other choice spirits, 
of the same vintage. 

Detective Tom McCarthy was in 
charge of the Commissary Depart- 
ment and performed his duties with 
signal bravery. In order to secure a 
desired elevation for the beer, a bar- 
rel was fastened to the shaft of the 
donkey engine. Before Grand Mar- 
shal Borlini had time to realize that 
he was dry, McCarthy would draw 
him another glass of beer, and Colonel 
Dunn and Captain Webb were kept 
very busy stacking up the contents of 
two schooners, establishing a reser- 
voir for the tish. 

Just as Tom McCarthy and his friend 
Judge Ryan of Los Angeles were en- 
joying their thirty-first beer, someone 
turned on the steam in the engine 
room, with the detective astride of 
the keg. 

The result was magical. Keg and 
commissary began to revolve through 
space, beer spouted out of the open 
spigot, and what with escaping steam 
and escaping beer, McCarthy and 
Ryan were soon as thoroughly soaked 
without as within. 

But McCarthy has ridden bucking 
broncos and he kept his seat. As the 
keg landed on the quarter deck, Tom's 
last words, with both legs wound 
tightly round the barrel, and with 
both arms rapturously embracing the 
spigot, were: 

" Well, boys, will you take it sharp 
or flat?" 



Disdaining the luxury of carriages 
in which other great war lords in- 
dulged, that grim old warrior, Briga- 
dier-General Harrison Gray Otis, 
ambled at the head of the Fourth of 
July procession, astride his own little 
bay nag. He cherishes strong ideas 
about martial consistency and he en- 
dorses the forcible equation expressed 
by General Dickinson at Santa Cruz, 
when the Sausalito soldier summed up 
the case by a concise explanation that 
whiskey is to soldiers as champagne 



NEVER HAS ANYTHING BEEN SO HIGHLY AND SO JUSTLY PRAISED AS 



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tonic and reconstituent properties of the we'l-knonn 
Mariani Wine, the most certain as well as the most 
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From ■' The London Sketch.'''' 



HAX O'RELL, 




1 he Renowned 


Writer snd Lecturer, 


Writes: 




\ 




J 


. •" Bfc 




s^-' 










t 



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put me on my feet ; one bottle made a new man of me. 
Yours gratefully, MAX O'RELL. 

ALL DBUGOISTS. 
Paris: 41 Boulevard Haussman. London: 83 Mortimer St 



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this season of the year, when, owing 
to trying climatic conditions, the 
system is especially susceptible to 
attacks of debility and prostration. 



VIN riARIANI (HARIANI WINE) 
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AVOID SUBSTITOTIONS. 
Montreal:. 28-30 Hospital St. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




FOURTH of July week is 
always an "off" one in 
San Francisco, the large 
e:;odus from town for the 
\ holidays leaving it compara- 
tively deserted, and yet de- 
serted could scarcely be ap- 
prouiialely applied to our streets last Monuay; such an 
outpouring of our people for the celebration of our Natal 
day has seldom been seen here, the sight of the marching 
soldiers and the glorious news received roused the popu- 
lace to a high pitch of enthusiasm, and the Fourth of July, 
1898, is one that will long be remembered by the rising 
generation of San Francisco. 

House parties for the holidays were the rule with tfiose 
who had homes along the line of the S. P. R. R. between 
the city and San Jose, and at the different points — Bur- 
lingame, San Mateo and Menlo Park — there were crowds 
of friends from town to help the villa owners make merry. 

The First Lutheran Church, on Geary street, was filled 
to its utmost on Tuesday evening last, not a seat being 
vacant for the marriage of Miss Lizzetta Pop and William 
E. Broderson. The decorations were confined to the 
chancel, in which were placed a number of giant palms 
spanned by a large arch composed of smilax and crimson 
roses. The bridal procession, which entered a little before 
9 o'clock, was led by a bevy of young maidens in flowing 
white robes, who chanted the bridesmaids' chorus from 
Lohengrin as they proceeded up the west aisle. Then 
came Messrs. Antz, Fleissuer and Fred Seibe, who had 
officiated as ushers, followed by the Misses Wanda Haden- 
feld and Martha Tiedmann, the two hridesmaids, who were 
costumed alike in gowns of pink taffeta, trimmed with 
pink chiffon, and carrying bouquets of La France roses. 
A couple of little girls in frocks of white muslin then ap- 
peared as flower bearers, and lastly the handsome 
brunette bride, escorted by Mr. William John, who gave 
her away. The bridal robe was of white brocaded satin 
t-it irti'titf, trimmed with lace and pearls, her tulle veil was 
confined to her coiffure with sprays of orange blossom, 
and her hand bouquet was of bride's roses. The ushers 
took their places to the left of the chancel, the brides- 
maids to the right, and in the center the groom and his 
best man, Emii Groezinger, awaited the bride. The cere- 
mony was performed by the pastor, Rev. Edward Ne- 
lander. Following the church service a reception was 
held at the John residence on Gough street, and an elabor- 
ate supper served. Mr. and Mrs. Broderson are spending 
their honeymoon at Del Monte. 

The country had a monopoly of weddings last week. In 
Sonoma Miss Agnes Durhing and C. T. Ryland were mar- 
ried by the Rev. Father Ramm; and in Santa Rosa Miss 
Mae Vrooman was the bride, Cleveland Forbes the groom, 
and the Rev. Dr. Maclean the officiating clergyman. This 
ceremony was performed in a bower of roses on the lawn 
of the bride's country home, and the bride, who was given 
away by Stephen .T. Gage, was attended by her sister, 
Miss Rachel Vrooman, as maid-of-honor, the Misses Agnes 
Borland and Edith Liliencranz as bridesmaids; then fol- 
lowed a dejeuner al frescv, which was laid under the shade 
of some fine old oak trees. 

The ceremony which united in marriage Miss Mary 
Bates and William McLellan took place at St. Paul's 
Church, Los Angeles, on Tuesday, the 2sth of June. 

Mrs. E. E. Caswell was among last week's departures, 
intending after a brief visit East to go on to Paris, where 
she will remain for several weeks." Mr. and Mrs. Will 
Crocker have returned from a prolonged absence in Eu- 
rope, and will spend the summer at Burlingame. 

Among the passengers who sailed on the last steamer 
leaving Seattle for Alaska were Mr. and Mrs. Henry 
Wangenheim, who visit their son Melville at Juneau. 




The boys in blue are being exten- 
sively entertained by the residents of 
San Francisco. The members of the 
Tennessee Regiment have found many 
old friends here, and Southern kins- 
folk of even most distant date are 
proverbial for being always ready to 
welcome those who come from the 
old home. Small gatherings where 
music, games, and dancing have com- 
bined for the evening's enjoyment, 
have been the rule, and dinners, 
where one or two only are to oe en- 
tertained. On Saturday at Locks- 
ley Hall, in Belvedere, C. O. Perry 
entertained a number of the Phi 
Delta Theta men of the Iowa and 
Kansas regiments with an elaborate banquet served on 
the veranda; the California Quartette and Mrs. Priest- 
Fine sang several selections, and there were toasts and 
speeches. Among recent dinners was a very delightful 
one given by Mr. and Mrs. William Haas, their guests 
selecting the Cliff House as the locale for the affair. These 
were Mr. and Mrs. Fred Jacobi and Miss Frances Jacobi. 
of New York, and I. W. Hellman, Jr., the ladies of the 
party declaring the barking of the sea lions far exceeded 
the sweetest Oriental strains as aids to digestion. 

Great preparations are being made for the annual sum- 
mer jinks of the Bohemian Club, which is to be held in 
their grounds in Marin county on the 23rd. Donald de V 
Graham has been chosen as the Sire for this occasion, and 
among those who will contribute to make it a success will 
be W. H. L. Barnes, Joe Redding, Horace Piatt, George 
Hall, G. F. Richardson, and George Bromley. Harry 
Dimond will look after the low jinks Dart of the programme 
and H. J. Stewart will have direction of the musical t>or- 
tion of it. 

Mrs. Eleanor Martin has been visiting her sons Peter 
and Andrew in Southern California. The Samuel Suss- 
mans are at Highland Springs for the summer. The Ig- 
natz Steinharts and Lawrence Van Winkle are among re- 
cent arrivals at San Rafael for the season. Mrs. D. D. 
Colton, Mrs. McLane Martin, Mrs. Crit Thornton, and 
their daughters are in residence at their Santa Cruz cot- 
tages for the summer months; Mr. and Mrs. Frank Sulli- 
van and family are at Phelan Park. 

There was, as anticipated, a large 
crowd at Del Monte, where the chief 
items were tennis, driving parties, 
picnics, fireworks, a ball and supper. 
Among those who have recently ar- 
rived there for the summer are John 
Parrott and family, the De Guignes 
and Paysons, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Zeile, 
Miss C. j. Flood, Mrs. Fred Low and 
Miss Flora, Miss Jennie Dunphy and 
her niece, Miss Viola Piercy, and the 
W. H. Huntingtons. Then, among 
other guests, are the Sam Sachs, Mr. 
and Mrs. H. Stebbins, Mrs. Wm. 
Alvord and Miss Ethel Keeney, Miss 
Polhemus, the Downey Harveys, the 
McBeans, the Langleys of New York, 
and others. At San Rafael for the 
holiday there was a tennis tournament, 
paper chase, charity tea, barbecue, 
and dance at the Hotel Rafael— amuse- 
ments varied enough to suit the most exacting. 

Mr. and Mrs. Adolphe Roos left the city last Tuesday 
for the East, where they go in search for a'uvres d'art for 
the new home now in course of construction on Pacific 
Heights. 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis Schwabacher, accompanied by their 
daughters, are spending the summer on Puget Sound. 

Qet the swel test gentlemen's summer goods at John W.Carmany's, 
25 Kearny street. 

Wanted— Pupils In elocution and reading; special attention to for- 
eigner*; terms very reasonable. Room 20ti, 1HH Market street, cor. Sixth. 

Jackson's Napa Soda Lemonade is a luxury— try it. 




I July 9, 1893. 



SAN I R VXCISCO NEWS LETTBR. 



21 



Recent arrivals at Lake Tahoc Include Mr. ami Mi'-* 
Charle- W. Uosenbaum and Miss Mina 5 
Clarence Walter, who is visiting his Ba 

'.adter; and Mr. and Mrs. K. S. Heller of New York 

The Max Brandensteins and the J. Jacobs have taken 
homes for the summer at Sausalito. 

The wedding day for the Hellman-Jacobi nuptials has 
been set for the 26tb of August, to be followed by that of 
Miss Neustadter aod Mr. Clarence Walter. 

A party of the guests of Kenilworth Inn enjoyed a moon- 
light trip about the bay last Monday night. Dr. Kleiser, 
I). B. Wilson, and R. A. Auzerais were the hosts, and 
their guests were Mr. R. A. Auzerais, Miss Reine Slater. 
Miss Corinne Lincoln. Miss O'Xeil, J. E. Sharp, and Mrs. 
Daggett. 

Mrs. Webster Jones and Miss Forman are spending a 
few days in Cazadero. 

Mrs. Emma Joseph and the Misses Joseph have returned 
to their home at the Palace Hotel after several months' 
sojourn at San Rafael. 

LOVELY CREATIONS IN GOWNS. 

Everything comes at last, and, for the grande dames of 
San Francisco, whose costuming is a matter of importance 
and often exasperation through inefficie"cy of modistes, a 
happy solution has arrived. Many of our best gowned 
women order their costumes from Paris, Vienna, or 
London, taking the chances of dissatisfactiun with fit or 
color, for the sake of advanced style and the inimitable 
finish which seems to be lacking this side of the water. 
To be well-dressed is the aim of every true wcmen, but to 
make of dressing, a fine art, to understand the poetry 
that can be put into clothes, is not for the many, though 
all can appreciate the result. 

Therefore, when the opportunity offers itself, to see and 
know what the refinement of dressing can be, it should 
not be allowed to pass by. 

Within our gates is a lady, who has brought to San 
Francisco the best there is, not excepting any of the 
European or Eastern modistes whose names are talismans 
in the world of fashion. 

The toilettes, model gowns only, which Mrs. White shows 
to one, are a revelation, a delight and a temptation. 
Smart frocks for the street, charming dinner-gowns, 
fascinating matinees, wraps that would grace a duchess, 
and airy, fairy creations for summer days, go to make up 
a collection that is well worth the seeing. 

Mrs. White, who is at the Palace, comes as the repre- 
sentative of Louis B. Caney of 41 West 42nd street, New 
York, whose costumes are beyond cavil, in design and 
execution. Her aim is to give to the women of this city 
an opportunity for selection from the best, and also enable 
them to dispense with the tiresome ordeal of "fitting." 
The Worth method is used, an impression being taken of 
the figure, which assures a perfect fit at once. 

The society women of New York and Chicago have 
shown their appreciation by their large orders; it only re- 
mains for the women of this city to show themselves equally 
enlightened. Mrs. White will "leave for Colorado Springs 
Sunday, thence for Newport. She will return to San 
Francisco in October with winter models. The present 
exhibition will conclude to-day at room 334, Palace Hotel. 

"But what reason," asked the disputatious boarder, 
"have you for averriDg that Adam was made of a particul- 
arly fine quality of clay?" "Because," said the Cheerful 
Idiot, "subsequent events showed that he had no sand." 
— Indianapolis Jo urnal. 

Mr«. Malaprop (horrified, at finding her daughter's w.aist 
encircled by a youDg man's arm)^Oh! And they told me 
he was. descended from one of the old Huguenot: families. 
— Judge. 

Embellish your ; homes,with the choicest woTks! of. art designedly 
cunning Japanese hands. . At Geo. T. .Marsh & ; Co.'s will he found 
anelegant assortment of rare and quaint art goods. Under the 
Palace hotel, 625 Market street. 



Leopold's, 35 Post street, is where all the ladies buy flowers. 
All sensible people drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



pM IN. 




LOOKING AHEAD. 

Tommy. — I got to go to work in a noffice nex 1 week, au' you bet 
I 'm goiu' to lay in a couple o' boxes o' dat Pearlink ! 

Billy.— G' wan ! What sjood Ml dat do ye? 

Tommy.— Ah ! did n't I hear me nuidder say yistiday dat it was 
degreates' stuff in de woiT >o save work ! — From Puck, New ) 'ot k. 



IRVING INSTITUTE 

2126 California St., S. F. 



Select boarding and day school 
foe young ladles 



Accredited to the Universities. Seminary and full Conservatory of 
Music. Primary department for children. A carriage will call. 
For further information address the principal, 

Rev. Edward B. Church, A. n. 

TRINITY SCHOOL. idTo^ g mel day schoolforboys 

Christmas Session Opens First Monday in August, 

An accredited school with the University of California and the Le- 

land Stanford Jr. University. A corps of eleven teachers. 

Rev. Dr. Spalding, Rector, 

3300 Washington street, S. F. 

riR. and MRS DICKINSON'S 



ACADEMY. 



1247 Franklin St., Neur Post, S. F. 



Reopens August 1, I898. 

English, French, German, and Spanish Boarding and Day school. 
Begins with kindergarten, and prepares for universities, business, 
and society. Drawing and painting, 

Cultured home training. Excellent table. $30 per month. 
Music in all its branches if desired, extra. 

HERCULES Marine Oil Engine &£«>gl 

surest engine 
for launches, yachts, and pleasure boats. Hercules Gas Engine Works, 
407 Sansome street, San Francisco. 

DR. T. FELIX GOURAUD'S ORIENTAL 
CREAM, OR MAGICAL BEAUTIFIER. 

Removes Tan, Pimples, Freckles, Moth 
Patches, Rash, and Sltiu^Diseases, and 
every blemish on beauty, and defies de- 
tection, tt has stood the test'bf -18 years- 
and is so harmless we taste it to be sure 
it is properly made. Accept no counter- 
feit of similar name.- Dr. L. A. Sayre 
said to a lady of the haut-ton -(a pa- 
tient) ; -'.'As you ladies will use them, I 
recommend ' Gouraud's Cream f as the 
least harmful of all the Skin prepara- 
tions." For sale by all Druggists and 
Fancy-goods Dealers in the United 
States, Canadas, and Europe. 

FERD. T. HOPKINS, Prop'r. 

37 Great Jones St., N. Y. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 9, 1898. 



INSURANCE. 

THE trouble at Denver continues. Nothing favorable 
resulted from the recent attempt to patch up difficul- 
ty B. The proposition was for companies to cut off all per- 
quisites allowed agents there, excepting the adjustment 
of losses, for which a reasonable compensation would be 
allowed. 

The impression has gone forth that a stamp tax of one 
cent will be required on receipts for money of amounts 
over $5. This was in the original law, but at the last 
minute it was stricken out. Some banks overlooked this 
in sending out notices, and are now rectifying the misin- 
formation. Some companies had arranged to acknowledge 
remittances by letter instead of a formal receipt and thus 
avoid the stamp tax. Local agents in giving bonds must 
have a 50-cent stamp attached. The companies will likely 
pay this. 

Lieutenant Hobson is insured for $10,11011. 

The Frankfort-American has deposited $250,000 with 
the New York Insurance department. 

The fire loss on this Coast up to the end of last month 
was nearly three-quarters of a million in excess of the 
same period last year. 

Commissioner Clunie has examined the United States 
branch of the Lancashire of Manchester, England, and is 
entirely satisfied with its condition. 

J. M. Beck, assistant manager of the Fire Association, 
will be located in Chicago during the summer. He will 
spend the winter on this Coast. 

The Delaware Insurance Company publishes an elaborate 
map of Santiago. 

The Thuringia-American Fire, an offshoot of the Thurin- 
gia Fire of Erfurt, Germany, has been organized in New 
York and licensed by Commissioner Payn. 

Clunie says he will appeal from Judge Morrow's decision 
at the risk of being prosecuted for contempt. 

Secretary M. O. Brown has recovered from his recent 
illness, and is now in Chicago. 

Charles R. Gilbert, formerly manager of the Montana 
State Board, has been appointed special agent of the Man- 
chester and Caledonian, under manager L. B. Edwards. 

Pickering & Adam of Portland have been appointed 
State agents of the Mutual Benefit Life for Oregon and 
Idaho. 

George L. North has resigned the Coast management 
of the Provident Savings Life, after having held it for a 
little over one year. 

H. A. Kinnev has sued the Home Life for $50,000 dam- 
ages. Kinney was recently arrested and charged by the 
company with embezzlement, but was acquitted. 

Russell W. Oaborn has been promoted to the assistant 
general management of the Pennsylvania Fire's Coast de- 
partment. 

J. W. G. Cofran, manager of the Hartford Fire's West- 
ern department, with headquarters at Chicago, is in the 
city. He will enjoy four weeks of camp life, come back 
thereafter for a fortnight's visit here, and then return to 
the Windy City. 

THE especial attention of those desiring to buy hand- 
some rigs, from a French T cart to an eight-passen- 
ger opera coach, are directed to the advertisement of 
Studebaker Bros., appearing on the cover of this week's 
News Letter. Studebaker Bros, manufacture the finest 
vehicles in the United States, and this clearance sale 
affords an unusual opportunity to purchase an outfit for 
the most reasonable price. 

A Panorama 440 Miles Lone 
From the Observation Car on the New York Central a living pan 
orama 4tu mile* long may be seen. This includes the (ienesse, 
Black River and Mohawk Valleys and 143 miles of the Hudson 
Kiver, including the foothills of the Adirondack Mountains, the 
Capitol at Albany : th» Catskill Mountains: the i'nlisades of the 
Hudson and the New York Central's magnificent approach to the 
inetriipiilis— this being the only trunk line whose trait" enter the 
citv of New \ork 

allkn's Press Cmppihg Hcrkac. 510 Montgomery street. S. F., deals 
D all kinds of newspaper Information, business, personal, political, from 
press of State, Coast, and Country. Tel. Main 104-2. 

Sober up on Jackson's Napa Soda. 





LONDON ASSURANCE. 
OCEAN MARINE, 



Capital Subscribed $4,482,750 

Capital Paid Up 2,241,375 

Assets 19,195,145 

Capital Subscribed $5,000,000 

Capital Paid Up 600,000 

Assets 2,502,050 



INSURANCE. 



FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

Firemans Fund 

INSURANCE COMPANY, OP SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Capital, $1,000,000. Assets, $3,500,000. 



PALATINE 



INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited), OF MANCHESTER, ENQLAND. 

SOLID SECURITY. OVER $8,000,000.00 RESOURCES 

CH AS. A. LATON, Manager 489 California St., S. F. 

FlRl IHSORAHCI. 

CONNECTICUT FIRE INSURANCE CO. OF HARTFORD. 

Capital Paid Up »l,0OO,O00 

Assets 8,aoo,01i 

Surplus to Policy Holders 1 ,888,832 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager. 

Pfll IM M BflVn San Francisco Agent. 

0ULII1 HI, DUIU. N. W. Cor. Sacramento and Montgomery StB., S. F. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INSURANCE CO., LIMITED, 

OF LIVERPOOL. 

Capital 18,700,001 

BALFOUR, 3UTHRIE & CO., Agents, 

No. 818 California St., S. F 

Founded A. D. 1792 

Insurance Company ol North America 

Or PHILADELPHIA, PENH. 

Paid up Capital t8,000,000 

Surplus to Policy Holders 6,022,016 

JAMES D. BAILEY. General Agent, 412 California St.. S. F. 

ROYAL EXCHANGE ASSURANCE, OF LONDON. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, A. D. 1736. 

Capital Paid Up, 13.446,100. Assets, 121.584.418. 

Surplus to Policy Holders, 88,980.251. 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager. FRANK W. DICKSON, Ass't Manager. 
501-503 Montgomery St., corner Sacramento. 

PHOENIX ASSURANCE CO. OF LONDON Established it*. 
PROVIDENCE-WASHINGTON INSURANCE CO. i-«,rpor»t.a it»9 

BUTLER & HALDAN, General Agents, 

418 California St., S. * 

THE THURINGIA INSURANCE COMPANY. 

Of ERFURT, GEKEANY. 
Capital. 12,250.000 Assets. I10.9k4.24H. 
PaclBc Coast Department! 204-208 SANSOME ST., S. F. 

VOSS. CONRAD & CO., General nanagews. 



. 1898. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



23 




w 



SONG.— CH*/SH*4 MCSSETTt. 

HEN I am dead, my dean 
BIng do Bad songs foi me; 

Plant thou uo roses at my head. 
Nor shad; cypress-tree: 

Be the green grass above me 

With showers and dewdrons wet ; 

And if thou wilt, remember. 
And if thou wilt, forget. 

I shall not see the shadows, 

I shall not feel the rain; 
I shall not hear the nightingale 

Slug on, as if in pain: 
And dreaming through the twilight 

That doth not rise nor set, 
Haply I may remember, 

And haply may forget. 

"CHANT d'AMOUR-"— /Mit mall magazine, july, ;ro«. 

How did I meet her? I trow 
Nought of the form of my greeting, 
Nor how she spake, but I know 
All of her bouI seemed to flow 
Into my soul at that meeting. 
"White was her garment that seemed 
Closely to cling and caress her, 
White was her forehead that gleamed 
Pure alabaster : I deemed 
'Twas not forme to possess her. 
Wells for her soul are her eyes, 
Stirred by the passions that move her; 
Into them gazing, thought flies, 
Lingering memory dies, 
Only I feel that I love her! 

Eyes so transcendently bright,— 
Eyes with such heavenly flashes 
One could not stand in her sight, 
So she has shaded their light 
Under the veil of her lashes. 
Cheeks of so rosy a hue ; 
Lips so perpetually sueing: 
Little white teeth peeping thro'— 
Sweetheart ! the blame is with you 
If fault there be in my wooing I 




IN LOVE'S TENDER KEEPING.~flMwr l stanton, 

Hold me a little away from the world, 

Dear arms I with your tenderest clinging; 
The bird with its breast to the blue singeth sweet, 

But the stars never answer its singing. 
The cold lights but lure us to lead us astray ; 
The thorn's in the red of the rose of May — 
Lead me to love, dear, and teach me to pray. 

Hold me a little away from the world, 

Dear arms ! with your firm clasp and tender ; 
For the lights on the heights stream through desolate nights- 

A tempest of tears in the splendor. 
'Tis the gleam and the dream that would lead us astray, 
The keen thorns have crimsoned the roses of May- 
Lead me to love, dear, and teach me to pray. 

LIGHT AND SHADE.— */c///!/ro burton in the Bohemian- 



This one knows joy, and says: "Ah, life is sweet! 

And sorrow this one ; " Nay, 'tis drowned in tears. 1 
Meanwhile, the picture is made all complete 

By God, great chiaroscurist of ihe years, 
Who uses light and shade, and in whose thought, 

The whole is clearly limned and calmly sought. 



YESTERDAY.— madaline s bridges, in Leslie's weekly- 



What is yesterday ? 

Yesterday is to-day grown tired and still 

With feet at rest and heart made mute and chill ; 

Tearless, unsmiling, unremembering, 

And unregretting; . . . gone as far away 

As the first night and morn. ... A waif and stray 

Lost in eternity, is yesterday I 



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all the people part of the time. 
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Beware of \ ohicaqo or 
imitations ! > NEW YORK, ass < 



ANNUAL MEETING. 

Best & Belcher Mining Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Best & Belcher 
Mining Company will be held at the office of the company, room 33, 
Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal., on 

MONDAY, the 11th DAY OF JULY. 1398, 
at the hour of 1 o'clock p, m. , for the purpose of electing a Board of Direc- 
tors to serve for the ensuing year and the transaction of such other busi- 
ness as may come before the meeting. 
Transfer books will be closed for two days prior to the dav of election. 

M. JAPFE, Secretary. 
Office: Room 33, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. ■ 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Crown Point Gold and Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, Cal. Location of , 
work— Gold Hill, Nevada 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors of this 
company, held on the 7th day of July, 1^98, an assessment (No. 74) ; 
of Five cents was levied upon each and every share of the capital ; 
stock of said company, payable immediately to the Secretary, at the office 
of the company, room 35. Mills building, third floor San Francisco, Cal. : 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
WEDNESDAY, the nth DAY OF AUGUST, 1898, 
will be deemed delinquent and duly advertised for sale at public auction : 
and unless payment shall be made before, will be sold on Wednesday, the 
31&t day of August, 1898. to pay the delinquent assessment, together with i 
costs of advertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Direc- 
tors. JAMES NEWLANDS, Secretary. 

Office— Room 35 third floor. Mills building, N. E. corner Bush and Mont- 
gomery streets, San Francisco, Cal. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE 

Gould &. Curry Sliver Mining Company, 

Assessment No. 84 

Amount per Share 10 cents 

Levied July 7, 1898 

Delinquent in Office August 8, 1898 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock August 29, 1898 

ALFRED K. DURBROW, Secretary. 
Office — Room 69, Nevada Block, 809 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 

IMPORTANT TO LAWYERS 

**- BRIEFS 



$1.00 — 

"PARTRIDGE" 
Fountain Pen 

With fine Gold Pen Point. 

JOHN PARTRIDGE, 

Stationer, Printer, Bookbinder. 



Printed in a night if required 
JOHN PARTRIDGE, 

Printer, 
306 California Street, S.F 



24 



SAN FRANXISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 9, 1898. 



Southern Pacific Co. —Pacific System. 

Trains Leave and are Due to Arrive at SAN FRANCISCO: 
(Main Line. Foot of Market Street.) 



.save. I 



From ./"/x I, 1898. 



I Arrive 



•6:00 a Niles, San Jose, and way stations *8:45 a 

7:00 a Benlcla. Suisun, and Sacramento 10:45 A 

7:00 a Marysville. Oroville, and Redding, via Woodland 5:45 p 

7:00 a Vacaville and Rumsey 8:46p 

7:30 a Martinez, San Ramon, Valle jo. Napa, Calls toga, Santa Rosa 6:15 P 

8:00 A Atlantic Express, Ogden and East 8:45 P 

8:30 a Niles, San Jose, Stockton, lone, Sacramento, Marysville, 

Chtco, Tehama, and Red Bluff 4 :15 P 

•8:80a Peters, Mtlton.and Oakdale »7:15p 

9:00a New Orleans Express, Merced, Fresno, Bakersfield, Santa 
Barbara, Los Angeles, Demlng, E) Paso, New Orleans, and 

East 6 

10:00 a Vallejo, Martinez, and way stations... " 

•1 :00 p Sacramento River s teamers *9 :( 

San Jose, Niles, and Way Stations J9: 

3 :00 p Livermore, Mendota, Hanford, and Vlsalla 4 : 

Livermore, San Jose, Niles and vVay Stations 110:1 

Fresno, Yosemlte, Merced, Martinez 

4:00 p Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, Napa, Callstoga, El Verano 

and Santa Rosa 9 : 

4:00 P Benlcla, Vacaville, Woodland, Knight's Landing, Marys- 
ville, Oroville, and Sacramento 10 :< 

4:30 p Niles, San Jose, Tracy, and Stockton 7:1 

4:30 p Stockton, Lodl, Oakdale (Jamestown for Yosemite). Merced 12 
4:30p Lathrop, Modesto, Merced, Berenda, (Raymond for Yosem- 
ite), Fresno, Mojave (for Randsburg), Santa Barbara and 

Los Angeles 7M 

4:30p Santa Fe Route, Atlantic Express, for Mojave and East 6:< 

6:00 p European mall, Ogden and East 9:* 

•6:00 P Vallejo. ... 12: 

6:00 P Hay wards. Niles and San Jose TM 

17:00 p Vallejo, Port Costa, and way stations Jt>:- 

8:00p Oregon Express, Sacramento, Marysville, Redding, Port- 
land, Puget Sound and East 



San Leandro and Bavwards Local. (Foot ol Market St.) 



;-■',«) a ] 
9 :00 a 
10:00 a 
ill. 00 A 
112:00 M : 
t3:00 P 
6:00 P 
7:00 P 



Melrose, Seminary Parr, 
fltcbbdro. elmbtjkst, 
San Leandro. 
Soctb San Leandro. 
estcdillo. Lorenzo, 
Cherry, and Hat wards. 

i Runs through to Niles. 
t From NUes 



7:15 A 
**9:4S A 
10:45 A 
1 1 :45 A 
12:45 P 
t\Ab P 
12:45 P 
(5:45 P 

7:45 P 



Coast Division (Narrow Gauge). (Foot of Market St.) 

{7:45 A Santa Cruz Excursion, Santa Cruz and Principal Way 

Stations 18:05P 

8:15 a Newark, ^entervllle, San Jose, Felton, Boulder Creek, Santa 

Cruz and way stations 5:50 p 

•2 :15 p Newark, Centervllle, San Jose, New Almaden, Felton, Boul- 
der Creek, Santa Cruz, and principal way stations *10:6Ua 

4:15p San Jose, Glenwood and way stations 9:90 a 

<24:15p Boulder Creek and Santa Cruz j9:20 a 

CREEK ROUTE FERRY. 

From San Francisco— Foot of Market street (Slip 8).- 
11:00 a. M., 11:00, "2:00,13:00. *4:00, 15:00 and »6:00p. m 

From Oakland— Foot of Broadway.— *6:00, 8:00, 10:00 A. 
12:00, •3:00,14:00 «5:00p. m. 



■•7:15, 9:00, and 
II.; 112:00, *l:00, 



Coast Division (Broad Gauge). (Third and Townsend streets). 

•7:00a San Jose and waystauons (New Almaden Wednesdays only) l:30p 
17:30 a Sunday Excursion for San Jose, Santa Cruz, Pacific Grove, 

and Principal Way Stations 18:36p 

9:00 a San Jose, Tres Pinos, Santa Cruz. Pacific Grove, Paso Robles 

San Luis Obispo, Guadalupe. Surf and principal way stations 4:10 ► 

10:40 a San Jose and way stations •8:00 a 

11 :80 A San Jose and way stations *8 :35 a 

•2:45 p San Mateo, Redwood, Menlo Park, Palo Alto. Santa Clara, 
San Jose. Gllroy. Holll&ter, Santa Cruz, Salinas, Mon- 
terey, and Pacific Grove *10:86a 

•3:30 p San Jose and Way Stations *9:00 A 

•4 :15 p San Jose and Principal Way Stations 9 :45 a 

•5 :00 p San Jose and Principal Way Stations 6 :35 a 

5 :80 p San Jose and principal way stations 5 :30 P 

6:S0pSanJose and way stations 7:30p 

til :46p San Jose and way stations 7 :30 p 

A for Morning, p for Aiternoon. •Sundavs excepted. tSaturdays only. 

t Sundays only. 

a Saturdays and Sundays. j Sundays and Mondays. 

The Pacific Transfer Company will call for and check baggage from 
hotels and residences. Enquire of Ticket Agents for Time Cards and 
other Information- 

Occidental and Oriental Steamship Co. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Steamers leave wharf, FIRST abd BRANN AN STREETS, at I p m., for 

YOKOHAMA AND HONGKONG. 

calling at tvobe (Hlo£o), Nagasaki and Shanghai, and connecting at 
Hongkong with steamers (or India, etc No oargo received on board on 
dayof sailing. 

Gaelic (via Hono'ulu) Tuesday. July !6, 1888 

Doric (via Honolulu) Saturday. August 13. 1898 

Bmioio (via Honolulu) Saturday, Siplt-mbcr S, I8B8 

Coptic (via Honolulu) Thursday, Sept. J2, lt08 

Rooicd Tbip Ticeitb at Reduced Rates. 

"tor freight or passage apply at Company's Office, No. 421 Market street, 
corner Pint. D. D. 8TUBBS, General Manager. 



45 P 
.45 P 


Leave S. F. 


In Effect June 26, 1888 


Arrive 


in S. F. 


:0OP 
15 A 


Week Days. 


Sundays. 


Destination. 


Sundays 

10:40 AM I 
6:10 pm 
7:35 pm 


Week Days 


15 P 
15 A 

:I5P 


7:30 am 
8:30PM 
6:10PM 


8:00am 
8 :30 AM 
5:00 pm 


Novato, 
Petaluma, 
Santa Rosa. 


8:40 A M 
10:26 AM 
6 :ii P M 


:15A 




8:00 am 


Fulton, Windsor, 

Healdsburg, 

Geyservllle, Cloverdale 




10:26 A M 


7:30am 
8:30 pm 


7:36PM 


45 A 


6:22 p M 


16 P 
15 P 


7:30 am 
3:30 PM 


8:00 am 


Hopland, Uklah 


7:35 p m 


10:26 AM 
6:22 pm 




7:80A M 
3:30PM 


8:00am 


Guernevllle. 


7:86PM 


10:25 A m 
6:22 P M 


:45P 
46A 


7:30AM 
5:10pm 


8:00am 

5:00 PM 


Sonoma, 
Glen Ellen. 


10:40 am 
6:10fm 


8:40 A M 
6:22 p M 


:15p 
:45 a 
:45p 


7:30AM 
3:30PM 


8:00AM 
5:00 PM 


Sebastopol. 


10:40am I 
7:35 PM | 


10:26 A M 
6:22 p M 



San Francisco and North Pacific R'y Co. 



SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. TlBDRON FERRY- Foot of MarketStreet. 

WEEK DAYS— 7 :30, 9 :00, 1 1 :00 A M ; 12 :35, 3 :30 5 : 10, 6 :30 p M. Thursdays- 
Extra trip at 11:30 p M. Saturdays— Extra trips at 1 :50 and 11:30 P M. 
SUNDAYS— 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 A M; 1:30, 3:30, 5:0U,6:20PM. 

SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO. 

WEEK DAYS— 8:10, 7:60, 8:20, 11:10 AM; 12:45, 3:40,5:10PM. Saturdays- 
Extra trips at 1:55 and 6:35 p M. 

SUNDAYS— 8:10, 9:40, 11:10 am; 1:40,3 40,5:00,6:25pm. 

Between San Francisco and Schuetzen Park, same schedule as above. 



Stages connect at Santa Rosa for Mark West Springs: at Lytton for 
Lytton Springs; at Geyservllle for Skaggs' Springs; at Cloverdale for the 
Geysers; at Hopland for Duncan Springs. Highland Springs, Kelsey- 
ville. Carlsbad Springs, Soda Bay, Lakeport, and Bartlett Springs; at 
Uklah, for Vichy Springs, Saratoga Springs, Blue Lakes, Laurel Del 
Lake, Upper Lake, Pomo, Potter Valley, John Day's, Riverside, Ller- 
ley's. Bucknell's Sanhedrln Heights, Hullville, Boonevllle, Orr's Springs, 
Mendocino City. Ft. Bragg, Westport, Usal. 

Saturday-to-Monday Round Trip Tickets at reduced rates. On Sundays, 
Round Trip Tlokets to all points beyond San Rafael at half rates. 

TICKET OFFICE-S50 Market St., Chronlole Building. 
A. W. FOSTER, Pres. & Gen. Manager. R. X. RYAN, Gen. Pass . Agent. 



fc. 



Pacific Coast Steamship Co. wlaT e ^%™n B c™c lwsy 

For Alaskan ports, 10 A. u. 
June 5, 10. 15. 20, 25, 30 : July 5 : transfer at Seattle. 

For Alaskan ports (from Folsom St. wharf) 10 A. m., 
June 5, 26; July 17; August 4, 25; transfer at Port- 
land. Or. 

For B. C and Puget Sound Ports, 10 a. m., June 5, 
10, 15. 20, 2.=., 30; Aug 5, and every fifth dav thereafter. 

For Eureka (Humboldt Bay) i0 a. m., June 1, 7, 13, 19, 
25; July 1, and every sixth day thereafter. 
For Newport < Los Angeles) and way ports, 9 a. m. June 
2, 6 10. t4, 18, 22, 26, 30; July 4, and every fourth day thereafter. 

For San Diego, stopping only at Port Harford, Santa Barbara, Port Los 
Angeles, Redondo, (Los Angeles) 11 a. m., June 4,8, 12, 16. 20, 24, 28; 
July 2, and every fourth day thereafter. 
For Mexican ports, 10 a. m.. July 17. 
For further information obtain folder. 

The company reserves the right to change, without previous notice, 
steamers, sailing dates, and hours of sailing. 

TICKET OFFICE— No. 4 New Montgomery street. (Palace Hotel.) 
GOODALL. PERKINS A CO.. Gen. Agts., 10 Market St., San Francisco 



Santa Fe 
Route 



REMOVAL, N0TI6&. 



After July 1, 1838, the Freight and 
Passenger offices of iLls company 
will be located at 



628 Market Street. 



Santa Fe Pacific R. R. Co. H. C. Brsn. r.encral Agent Freight Dept. 
(i l Chronicle Building, S F. JOBH L. Tutsi., iw, I ;<-neral Ag't Pass. Dept- 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Chollar Mining Company. 

Assessment No. 46 

Amount per Share 15 cents 

Levied June 6, 1898 

Delinquent In office July 12, 1898 

Day of sale of Delinquent Stock — August 4. 1898 

CHAS. E. ELLIOT. Secretary. 
Office— Room 79, Nevada Block. No. 309 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco, California. 



EANIC 




SS "Alameda," Wednesday July iath, at 2p. m. 
Line to Ooolgardle, Australia, and Capetown 
South Africa. 

J. D. SPRECKELSABROS.CO. 

Agents, 114 Montgomery St. Freight office, 827 
Market St., San Francisco. 



Price per Copy. 10 frits. 



Annual Subscription, $4.00 








Vol. UN. 



SAN FRANCISCO, JULY 16, 1898. 



Number 3. 



rdayby the proprietor. EREJj HARRIOTT 
Francitcc. Ei.t.r.il at *</>« Enih-t.ro Post- 
ojtr. IM Matter. 

Tke o«. - un LETTER in .\V«- York OUy i> <it TtmpU Omtrij 

and at Chicago. 90.1 Hoyee Rnitdimj (Frank E Morrison. So 
Repreeentatir^/ \chtr< information may be obtained ngarib. 
tion fM / rah t. 

«T last the long delayed effort to establish a free mar- 
ket in San Franc'seo is to be carried into practical 
effect. The Harbor Commissioners have passed a resolu- 
tion providing ample space for the free storage and sale 
of country produce direct to the consumer — doing away 
with middlemen, who quite naturally oppose it. The free 
market should result in a very material reduction in the 
cost of garden truck, fruits, etc., to the consumer in this 
city. For years the first prices on the water front for 
garden and orchard produce have been from twenty-five to 
fifty per cent less to the pocket of the man that lands them 
on the dock — than tn the family that eats them not three 
miles away in the Western Addition, the difference being 
represented by the commission man. The free market 
should change all this, and cheapen the price to the con- 
sumer, while increasing the profits of the producer. 

WHEN there was probability of war between the 
United States and Spain many of the foremost states- 
men of the country were bitterly opposed to it, as was by 
far the preponderance of the respectable press of the 
nation. When, through unwise counsel and confused and 
incorrect ideas of the actual situation in Cuba, the land 
was plunged into the struggle, and the die cast, there was 
but one voice in reply to the call to arms. Among tbe 
public men who exerted every influence to avert the war 
was Representative Loud of the Fifth Congressional Dis- 
trict, this State. He fought against it as did hundreds of 
other men who saw that peace with honor was possible to 
Cuba, to Spain, and to America, but when the war came 
do man was more prompt to give his voice and influence 
and vote in aid of the Government's cause. No Repre- 
sentative in Washington was more enthusiastic in his sup- 
port of the President, and no one believed more firmly in a 
vigorous prosecution of the struggle to a quick and suc- 
cessful termination. 




V 



HE break in the School Board should 
compel the acceptance of cleaner meth- 
ods by the bandit members. Tbe men in the 
Board who stood together — and also stood up 
the taxpayers — have engaged in a few per- 
sonal reminiscences of a highly interesting 
character, and by which the public pocket 
should be made thousands of dollars the 
richer. When the last Grand Jury was dis- 
missed because the presiding Judge plainly 
declared that it had outlived its usefulness, it 
was reported by the members that they were 
hot on the track of the School Board, and 
that, had they not been bodily fired out, 
startling revelations would have been made. 
The attention of the present Grand Jury is 
directed to these statements, and to the fur- 
ther fact that the split in the Board makes 
investigation easier and the hope of tangi- 
ble results more probable. That the game is worth the 
candle will not be questioned by anyone who pays taxes 
in this city. It is true that "tbe salary of a member of 
the Board of Education is small, but this fact hardly 
justifies the sand-bagging of honest citizens in broad 
daylight. 



SANTIAGO has fallen; General Toral has surrendered, 
and at this writing (Thursday p. m.), it is understood 
that the Spaniards save their side arms and obtain trans- 
portation back to Spain. The number of men to be taken 
tome, reported at 30,000, will require many transports 
and a heavy expenditure of money to deliver them on 
their own soil, but the terms are favorable to the United 
States. The victory is the most important of the war, 
and should go far toward bringing the struggle to a con- 
clusion. The fall of Santiago frees the American navy 
and investing forces for work elsewhere, which should 
mean the early occupation of the entire island. Surely 
peace cannot be far off. 

AMONG the many citizens in public life in the city who 
promptly forfeited their offices and put away the 
emoluments of their positions for the glory of their coun- 
try and honor of the flag, may be mentioned District 
Attorney William S. Barnes. He promptly tendered his 
services to the Governor, stood his examination, and se- 
cured a captaincy. He got a month's leave of absence 
from his office out at the City Hall. If his command be 
ordered away before the expiration of that time there 
will be a permanent vacancy in the District Attorney's 
office; if the boys are still here, the cable that gracefully 
surrounds the Captain's official chair beneath the big dome 
will remain secure. The Captain has shown bis loyalty to 
the flag by being willing to take all the hazards and for- 
tunes of war to earn his title. May his martial shadow 
never grow more portly. 

COL. HENSHAW, commanding the soldiers at Camp 
Barrett, Oakland, is made of the right sort of stuff. 
He looks upon his own position and tbe duties of the 
( soldiers under him se- 

riously. This officer 
says that soldiering is 
not playing; that the 
men have enlisted to 
study the science of 
war and to make of 
themselves capable, 
seasoned ranks. This 
cannot be accom- 
plished by permitting 
them tbe freedom of 
Oakland and the un- 
authorized pleasure 
of going and coming 
when and where they 
will. No man gets 
away from Camp Barrett without a permit, and he has 
to give a valid reason for his absence before he is allowed 
to go. The custom of tbe camps at San Francisco has been 
anything but salutary. Discipline has been noted for its ab- 
sence; the streets have been filled with soldiers at all hours 
of the day and night, and the brass buttons have broken out 
like a rash' to the accompaniment of silly, gum-chewing, 
giggling girls, whose brainless parents should be spanked 
aDd sent to bed or to a lunatic asylum. The situation is 
anything but complimentary to the officers having charge 
of these volunteers. It is natural that raw recruits 
should chafe under restraint, and that their well-meaning 
officers should hesitate about enforcing even lax rules for 
their government. But those in supreme command should 
know how to draw the rein sharply — and they should not 
hesitate to do it, and do it now. Let them take a pointer 
from Colonel Henshaw — more power to his good right arm. 




SAN FR, NEWS LETTER. 



July 16. 1898. 



THE NEW POLICY OF FOREIGN EXPANSION 

THE demand of the cay is for c slant Colonies and 
foreign expansion. The signs are only loot 
that oar people have, for tbe time be 
their hearts upon gobbling up other peop.es acre* 
thoogh they have to go to toe other side of tbe globe in 
quest of them. That marvelous representation of the 
wealth and greatness of a mighty Empire which attended 
the celebration of Queen Victoria's jubilee, wts an object 
lesson that fired tbe imagination of this vast, restless, and 
ambitious young Republic. Less than three months ago 
we were hardly conscious of tbe virus that had entered 
our veins. Our civil war taught us that we could, at 
short notice, enlist any required number of soldier - 
could fight, but it remained for Admiral P.- wey at Manila 
to open our eyes to the fact that we had a navy that could 
go anywbere'acd do anything: that, as a matter of actual 
fact, bad destroyed or captured a fleet, composed of Eng- 
lish built m o dern vessels, without tbe loss of a single man. 
It was an achievement, new and unexpected, that sect a 
jf pleasureabie excitement through every patriotic 
Ame r ic a n heart. We previously knew that we wi 
li at ib l e as against any foreign aggressor 00 our own 
broad domain, but what' we had not reacted was that we 
:--. .. : si .- ::/ : . : -r:- ■.'- e:ri ? ? :t =■ •• z -z 
his fleet, silence his forts and capture his cities. A new 
destiny was opened out to us. We were quick to discern 
that we were "in the worli of it. and prompt to decide that 
henceforth the United States must be a power among the 
powers. On the moment, as it were, we learned to des- 
pise that which had previ jusly been our safeguard and 
our boast: namely our isolatsos. 

^ wants, not theretofore dreamed of. arose. Mani- 
our fleet most plow the ocean deep, and everywhere 
be within reach of a base of supplies, all its own. This, of 
coarse, involved the po ss es s ion and ownership of coaling 
stations, dry docks and provision warehouses, and, as we 
mast have these, why not take the countries in which our 

-■_■--_■:. :z\ : '■'■':, z:: : : — : 

Erea oar clergy, though supposed art to be men of the 
world, could see manrfciM re a son s why this easy transi- 
tion from i solation to the exercise of foreign A-"*""- 
skjoold take place. Tbey were able to trace the "finger 
of God" m it afl, and, of coarse. His pur po s e s and designs 
were not to be frustrated, even if we were that way in- 
cined. which we were not It win thus be seen 'bow 
naturally we have happened upon a brand new policy of 
adventure, conquest, and expansion over the seas t- 

;-.c-: _•-- :•-•.«.':;.: : 1 v- .. ..:: : r- - 
- --.:.-. _:Vi::i- e: - - - \ :'-.- ::>r 1 -zzz~: -_-- 
or more. With the annexing of Hawaii, the new depart 
ure w* have been fairty begun, bat the prescience is not 
given to any one of us to-day to tell where it wi*: all end. 
We can bat judge of what win be by what has been. From 
fame iamaemorial, earth Imager has grown upon what it 
fe*i »-:<: become ii insatiable i::*v.-.c with those who 
have in d u lg ed it. The i i lnl inm— and seizing of foreign 
wans has always bad :. farrjnatini for amakmd :- - ■ 
the desnohug of the band of Canaan to the latest parti - 
tioaaag of Cciia. it has been so. Presentlr we shall have 
our conquerors, our Deweys and oar Shatters laden with 
the 



mas of victory and the Innilm ' of war, making their 
phal entries into Washington, as the Cass* - 

They wQ come with their captives in their 
Oerreras, their lioatejos. their Tbralsaad 
their FXaccos. and lav whole provinces al f the 

President. Of course, the thanks of the - 
plaudits of the people wnl follow. History wiu be repeat- 
ing . tse ' over agaia. e Eke nothing so much as 

proce e d no farther. 
There is a safer and better, as well as a higher and 

s, and. trnta 
- - es has expe r i ence d it to a degree 
pa-a.e. : .z >ae h Jwdred rears ago— a short tame 

m the fife of a Nation— we were 

-aod on the Atlantic 
*-**• of the continent. Pc 

fathers ia those days. and wooer the exceptua. A Vander- 
: ■"■ - • - ' - "■=■ ■■ ..- ■ •. . = : - - 7 :. 1- 



*-~ ~:-r \ziz ?- - — 1 - - - rz ~ z :- i |oietaBd 

peaceable possession of a continent on which we have 
created more wealth than any other nation has acquired 
since the beginning of tim- We have uoeartbed more 
gold than there previously »as - world, we have 

built nearly as many miles of railroad as a.', other nations 
combined: we are to-day the granary of Europe, which 
would have starved during the past year but for our vast 
and ferti.e fields: through numberless telegraph wires we 
are in voice with each other, and. through a stupendous 
cable service, we are in touch with tbe rest of mankind. 
If all this is not "expansion,"' what is it? We ta.fc of 
England, and ber Colonies, and what they have done. We 

-o disposition to belittle the Birr; 
tailed by the Mother Country during the pre=-r 
which, but for the achievements of the United States in 
the same time, would be without a parallel. Americans 
have do reason to envy England, inasmuch as tliey nave 
but to look at borne and see ber best achievement 
than matched. We consist to-day of more . - speak- 
ing people than she does. She would almost gh 
if she could bring her colonies into touch with ber in the 
same sense that our diSerent States are in touch with each 
other. It is ber misfortune that her parts are scattered: 
it is our greatest advantage that our States are joined 
together. Tbey are. however, not fully occupied, nor 
their resources developed, and until tbey are it is folly to 
think of foreign possessions. Talk about expansion 
we have tarcr begun to expand yet! There is room, 
right now. for fifty millions of people on this Coast, between 
>- -.- J -.-'•_".■ . : /. - : ■ - ' --: -- - _■ - 

wbneb beg -.- *: bnasc 

Ti«e P»e. : - 

- a ; for the President of tbe United Stales 

— a President's standard or colors for 
the army or to fly above the residence of the nation's com- 
mander-in-chief, and for use whenever he reviews parades, 
■r - ::- ' - . :- - ._• - : :' - :. - - : ■ _ : -. ij ■■_ -\ . .- -_ -.. ; 
fly and eight feet hoist. In each cor- 
ner is a five-pointed white star of five- 
inch radius to the tips. In the center 
of the scarlet field is a large fifth star, 
als-i of five points, two feet nine inches 
radius to tbe tips. Inside of t: 
is a parallel star, separated from it by 

_ ■ Jl ■' = •--■-.- . - ;_ _ ; - 

inner star forms a blue field, upon which 

is the official eoat-of-armsof tbe ' 

States, of the Department of State de- 

-.- 1: ■ - ----: -r . i-:.-_ : -.re 

large star are other white stars, one 

for each State, equally scattered is the 

re-entering angles, and all included 

within the circumference of a circle of 

three feet three inches radios. In tbe upper point, over 

the eagle, is a const eB a tinn of thirteen stars, representing 

-.'-■e -_ i -■ J :-j ::-- .--- \: ' :: \ •-_- z 

A curious coincidence may be found m the recurrence of 
:- - z ------ -.— • 7 £__- . : r •.-.--.----'-.-- " ._- 

co rre s ponds with the thirteen original States: tbe thirteen 
stars represent the national fiingx net from war iato 
; -- r . - -- -:--:- there are taarteea green nine 

leaves, thirteen fruits in the eagle's left talon, thirteen 
arrows in its right. The legend. "E nferiU* anna 
spelled in thirteen letters, and the official order recogniz- 
:;:•-::;.• '•: 1 

In the fight of all these facts and the kastorr of the 

•-unluckT number 1 




-:--r iu- - - - ;;: i: : .-.".--.-. :zi 
selection of the old race track for the 
anwhe is ' camp was a mistake from every 
pomt of view. There has never been any doubt that the 
Presidio- was and is the proper place for 'the soldiers who 
: * are m atea bare iii I r i =:: may .-r.-ri'irr . :.-r 
to San Franeisco. Just how the site near the Park was 
chosen has never been explained. The reasons hare act 
been stated, bet there has been a clearly-defined < 
that the v were not altogether creditable to whoever"] 
th* choice. Icvest^ati?: ijc?vers the milk in this ;uicy 






WITH S f. NEWS LETTER JULY 16, 1393. 



PLATE 102. 




PICTURESQUE SAN FRANCISCO. 



July 16, 1S98. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTP.R 



military cocoanut, and it also shows that the G ivcramont 
it paying quite handsomely for the desertion of the Pre 
sidio for Camp Merritt. 

There is in all contracts for supplies a provision which 
compels contractors to furnish all goods at any given sta- 
tion at a certain figure. Thus, if the soldiers had all gone 
to the Presidio, contractors would have been com p. 
furnish their largercontracts at the figures that prevailed 
before the recruits arrived; and as the departmert had 
given ample notice by advertisement, and competition was 
sharp, the margin of profit would have been small. When 
the soldiers were sent to Camp Merritt. those conditions 
were cancelled, and in the rush to provide for the men no 
advertisements were published, contracts were let in a 
hurry, and at prices very much above the cost of original 
supplies for the Presidio. From this direction came the 
pressure that forced, or induced, the selection of Camp 
Merritt. 

The local authorities have protested against this camp- 
ing ground, and yet, so far as we are able to discover, 
there is no disposition to move the troops from Merritt to 
the place that natural conditions, the welfare of the men, 
economy of the department, and the health of the city de- 
mand. We note that one of the churches located near the 
camp closed its doors last Sunday, and held no service be- 
cause of the unsanitary conditions existiog there. The 
ground is level at Camp Merritt; drainage is absolutely 
impossible. The disease-breeding atmosphere will become 
more and more polluted as the soil becomes saturated with 
filth, and an epidemic of zymotic disease, not only among 
the soldiers, but throughout that section of the city, will 
only be averted because of the healthful breezes that for- 
tunately sweep off the ocean during the summer months. 

Everything favors the Presidio as the home for the sol- 
diers. The topographical conditions are perfect. The 
grounds are well sheltered and slope away gradually to the 
bay. Drainage perfect, grounds ample, and water in 
abundance easily obtained; what more could be desired? 
This matter is of sufficient importance to demand the 
Washington department's immediate attention. Waiving 
the motives and misrepresentations which resulted in the 
making of Camp Merritt, the health of both citizens and 
soldiers require that prompt attention be given to this 
menacingly serious condition. 

The Problems We think that bythis time the American 
That Confront people have an abiding confidence in the 
Us At Manila, ready adaptability of Admiral Dewey to 
changing circumstances. It is well that 
it should be so, for otherwise the tension that would be 
felt in regard to the condition of affairs in and around 
Manila would be painful. There can be no question but 
that problems are arising there that may not be easily 
solved, and that may give rise to troubles that have not 
hitherto been reckoned with. In the first place, 
Aguinaldo's power is an uncertain, and may prove a 
dangerous quantity to deal with. In the next, it is appar- 
ent that Germany has not sent her Asiatic Squadron there 
for our benefit, and that she is ready to take advantage of 
anything that may turn up. Then again, it is to be re- 
gretted that the weakness of our forces does not permit of 
our taking hold of the local situation with a fi rm grasp, 
and controlling it. General Merritt should reach Manila 
bay shortly, but even so, he will not have troops enough 
with him to dictate any course of action to Aguinaldo, 
should that desperate gamester be playing a hana of his 
own, as we believe he is. Tbehinthas come from London, 
more thau once, that we should be wary of the Insurgent 
Chief. Journals, believed to be inspired, have had articles 
veiled in language more cautious than explanatory, but 
plainly intended as hints to whom they may concern. 
Those articles are not the mere, speculation, or guess 
Work of a scribe, but are assuredly the result of the 
British Foreign office's information. Since they were 
written we have begun to get glimpses of Aguinaldo's lone 
hand. He is making haste to play it. all by himself, and is 
now practically master of "toe Philippines, without regard 
to Dewey. He is at the. head of an . army flushed with 
victory, and some thirty thousand strong. He occupies 
all the forts, except those pointing.. towards,, the sea from 
the city front. He controls all the sources of food supply, 



and is even in possession of the American rifles ai d am- 
munition. His latest move in raising a Beet of merchant- 
men to patrol the Coast, is suggestive of his design to es- 
tablish a government whose authority we may not gainsay. 
To cap all this, it now appears that Dewey is beginning to 
lind him refractory, and more amenable to German than 
American influence, That he is not a patriot, but a known 
and proven soldier of fortune, who would sell out his con- 
quests to the highest bidder, is one of the misfortunes of 
the situation. We guess Agusti was about right when he 
offered a reward for his head. What will General Merritt, 
have It in his power to do when he reaches his destination? 
Duly commissioned by the President of the United States 
to act as Governor General, it will be his duty to land, oc- 
cupy Manila, and exercise all the functions of Government. 
That he will endeavor to fulfill his mission goes without 
saying. But then may come the tug of war, with the 
strongest team on the other side of the line. The whole 
situation is one of illimitable possibilities. Whatever else 
we may ultimately determine to do with the Philippines, 
we must not leave them for an adventurer to barter away 
as he pleases. 

Is The Klondike A The last half of Julv is here, but 
Comparative Failure? the gold from the Klondike is not. 
Where are the forty millions, or 
more, that were to dazzle our eyes about the middle of 
June? The Yukon was open to navigation some two or 
three weeks earlier than was expected, steamers got 
through to St. Michaels a month ago, parties of returning 
miners have dropped into different Pacific Coast ports, 
and quietly dispersed to their homes, but of gold there is 
not a sign. The Seattle papers have had exceptionally 
fine opportunities to interview the returning men, but have 
not availed themselves of them. Their silence is ominous. 
Can it be that there is but little gold to come and that 
what there is had to pass into the hands of the store- 
keepers for winter supplies, and will cut no figure in the 
show windows of our gold brokers? One returned party 
that have just reached their New Jersey homes, by way of 
Seattle, report that "deception has been persistently 
practiced along the whole route from Seattle to Dawson 
City, by the various interests concerned is a large exodus 
to the gold regions, and that the discoveries were exceed- 
ingly limited in area, and far from being as rich as repre- 
sented. If a prospector came out with $1,000, the report 
would be circulated that he had $20,000. Hundreds of 
gold seekers are returning in no amiable mood, and many 
hundreds more would come out, if they had the means. Of 
the thousands who started for Dawson City, not more than 
half got in. The number who died by the way will never 
be told. The gold to come out during the next two months 
will hardly exceed $10,000,000. New discoveries must be 
made, or there will be no chance for miners in the Yukon 
region." All of which seems to be supported by the lack 
of gold and cheering. reports from the now open regions. 
It is suggestive that the army of "special commissioners" 
— Joaquin Miller, Livernash, and the rest, have subsided. 
The boom has burst, and now gold will be searched for, and 
found, in Alaska in a more reasonable and natural way. 
We have learned the lesson that if only the cupidity of men 
were sufficiently excited, they would, and could if neces- 
sary, march direct to the North Pole in order to gratify 
it. 

The Advantages It is verv apparent that the new war 
Of The loan of $200,000,000 is highly approved 

Popular Loan. by our people. Subscriptions are pour- 
ing in at a marvelous rate, and it now 
appears that the whole amount will be taken in sums at 
and below $500. There is a profit in buying these bonds 
now from the Government, because they will surely go to 
a premium of some five or six per cent after allotment. If 
the Secretary of the Treasury had offered them in un- 
limited quantities to the highest bidders, they would have 
been taken at about 105 by banks and capitalists, and, of 
course, in that case the Government would have been, a 
gainer. , As it is, the profit will be divided around, among 
four or five hundred"thousand small subscribers, and it is 
wellthat.it should,' be. That many saving, industrious 
people will have an interest in the stability they never had 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 16, 1898. 



before. Not one of them will ever again vote for fifty cent 
dollars. This popular loan will kill Bryanism. For the 
ih-st time we shall begin to realize the truth there is in the 
English saying: "A national debt is a national blessing." 
When it is owned at home, the country is not impoverished 
by it but the interest it earns returns to the people. If 
one person in every seven of the country's population were 
to subscribe for a twenty dollar bond, and considerably 
more than the entire $200,000,000 would be absorbed, and 
we should have among us between 7,000,000 and 8,000,000 
bondholders, though not of the "bloated" sort, all of whom 
would be intensely interested in maintaining the credit of 
the Government. Somewhere about <>, 0011,000 voted for a 
depreciated dollar at the last election, which it would not 
have been in human nature for them to have done had they 
been creditors of the Government. When a man's funds 
are invested in the ship of State he will naturally take 
more interest in its navigation, will study more closely the 
courses it is to pursue and will, so far as his influence goes, 
see to it that its destinies are committed to no unsafe 
pilots. The wide distribution of the present loan is there- 
fore to be highly approved. If the Government could re- 
fund all its indebtedness, and dispose of the re-issued bonds 
at home, it would be a good thing done. There is a 
plethora of money in the country now, much of which is 
seeking investment at 2J per cent, and there is more com- 
ing along. The balance due us on foreign trade for the 
fiscal year which ended on the 80th of last mouth, exceeds 
$600,000,000. The United States are rich enough to carry 
their own debt 

The Way in Which The President has done well to cause 
the United States it to be plainly understood that when 
Makes Peace. the United States makes peace it 
will be with Spain direct. He can- 
not too firmly adhere to that text. We want the fingers 
of no middle-men in our pie. We do not want even our 
enemy to have to pay large brokerage for services that he 
is as well able to perform himself. We will take no treaty 
of Berlin in ours, nor consent to be robbed of the fruits of 
our victory, as Japan was. It is well to have all this un- 
derstood in advance, because Continental Europe is assum- 
ing already that it will be represented in the meeting 
which arranges the terms of peace between the United 
States and Spain. Thus we get intimations from Berlin 
that " Germany intends to have a voice in the future dis- 
position of the Philippines;" and there are thinly disguised 
menaces from the press on the other side of the Rhine 
" that in the fate of Porto Rico, if it is wrested from 
Spain, France will not be altogether indifferent." Russia 
intimates that "in certain contingencies she may become 
interested in the disposition made of the Philippines." All 
that might be very well if we were feeling or exhibiting 
any signs of weakness, but America is strong enough in 
her thews and sinews to paddle her own canoe on a much 
longer journey than this is going to be. It is not her way 
of making peace to permit the meddling of an uninvited 
intermediary. In framing treaties after the wars in which 
she has been engaged, this country has, in every instance, 
treated with her opponent solely. She does not permit 
any surveillance or supervision by outside nations. In the 
arrangement of the peace conditions at the end of the 
present war, Spain and the United States are the only 
powers that will participate. 

The Noises Of Happily, San Francisco is not inflicted 
Great Cities. with the noise and smoke of passing 
locomotives, and to that extent, at least, 
finds some compensation for being located 00 "the wrong 
side of the bay." Yet of noises peculiarly her own, she 
has more than enough. We say "more than enough," be- 
cause men and boys ought not to be permitted to discharge 
bombs and pistols on the streets, and in the very ears of 
passers by, as they have been doing ever since the Fourth 
of July. The practice ought long ago to have been sup- 
pressed by the police. The ear drums and nerves of 
normally constituted people are entitled to some protec- 
tion. Even the man with the minute guns, which shake 
our windows, rattle our sanctum, and make the very 
earth under us tremble, creates a nuisance right in the 
heart of the city that might be petitioned against with 
success. Whilst we are increasing our noise, it happens 



that New York is winning distinction by suppressing hers. 
The New York Central Railroad, on its own motion, led in 
the movement. It ventured upon the experiment that its 
trains, on approaching the city, should use their bells and 
whistles as seldom as possible, and that only smokeless 
coke should be burnt within the city limits. The improve- 
ment is said to be very marked. The example thus set 
has led to many other changes for the better; among other 
things the factory and mill whistles have been ordered 
stopped. The American people are evidently growing in 
respect to sensibility to noise. This may be taken to be 
a sure sign of intellectual advancement. It was a German 
scientist who said that highly cultured people could not 
s» ind noise, and that "greatness was never yet born with- 
in sound of a locomotive." As a matter of observation, he 
had noticed that men who liked to discharge explosives for 
the sound they made "lacked sensitiveness and brains." 

Consui-Generai Joseph W. Warburton, Consul General 
Warburton. of Great Britain at San Francisco, has 
sent in his resignation, to take effect 
during this month. Mr. Warburton is one of the oldest 
members in the British Consular service, and his retire- 
ment after a full period of service will carry with it a large 
pension for life. The retiring Consul-Geueral has had vast 
experience in his official capacity in different portions of 
the globe, and his ability and tact has been recognized by 
steady promotion from one important post to another by 
Her Majesty's Government. Here be made many friends, 
who will wish that lines in the future will be cast in pleas- 
ant places, with many years remaining for him to enjoy 
the repose he has well earned by long and faithful service. 
As San Francisco is now looked upon as a retiring post by 
the Government, it is not likely that Vice-Consul Wellesley 
Moore will be selected to fill the vacancy, to which a great 
many people here think he is rightfully entitled. The 
rules of the service will not, however, permit this, but it 
will probably result in his promotion to a Consul-General- 
ship at some other important post, in the due order of 
sequence in rank. 

THE courts have always held that for proved mistakes 
in sending telegrams, the companies are responsible 
in money. The Western Union some time ago made a 
very serious mistake in a dispatch sent from San Fran- 
cisco to Los Angeles. For the word "well" the operator 
substituted the word "ill," thus conveying a meaning ex- 
actly the reverse to that intendtd. The person re- 
ceiving the startling information of the illness of some one 
who was well, in great alarm telegraphed for further in- 
formation. The long-distance telephone was called into 
use, and at an expense of several dollars the mistake was 
rectified. The bill thus made necessary by the careless- 
ness or incompetency of the operator was sent to the 
company for payment. The error was admitted, but the 
bill has not yet been paid. Why there should be delay to 
settling so small a matter is rather surprising. Is it not 
bad enough to subject the customer to the alarm, annoy- 
ance, and delays of such inexcusable stupidity without 
taking money out of one's pocket ? 

AN evidence of the possibilities of successfully colonizing 
tracts of land in this State is found in the work ac- 
complished by the Salvation Army's Soledad colony. 
Major W T inchell, who has charge of the movement, says 
that $5,000 will be made, notwithstanding the fact that 
the season has been unfavorable. The colony consists of 
seventy-five persons, and they produce alfalfa, beans, 
potatoes, corn, sugar beets, and fruit. Diversified farm- 
ing wins in California, as it has done elsewhere. The 
colony scheme at Soledad will blaze the way for an impor- 
tant extension next winter, when the poor and helpless 
present their claims for charity. The sweat of the lab- 
orer, mixed with the soil at Soledad, has yielded a splendid 
crop. Philanthropy and necessity may well meet on this 
sturdy ground and form a lasting and beneficial union. 

New line of picture frames, in metal, gold, and old oak, green 
vory, and Japanese gray ; also elegant line of picture mouldings. 
John F. Kennedy, Art Dealer. 19 and 21 Post street. 

All sensible people drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



July :6. 1898. 



SAX FRANCISCO NBWS LETTER 



ft 



!«otium* Nioss 13 



M 



1 ark. 



". 



THERE are some people who think that schooners of 
beer are appropriate in the way of refreshments for 
our soldiers at the front, but abstemious Californians like 
our own John W. Mackay believe in schooners of ice, and 
accordingly he shipped a schooner full of that tropical 
luxury last week, and will continue such shipments from 
time to time, as the wants of our boys in brown shall re- 
quire. Mr. Mackay tried very bard to conceal his agency 
in this sensible relief, but it leaked out, as all good deeds 
should, and now the old Californian is modestly receiving 
the thanks of the soldiers and stay-at-homes for his 
thoughtful consideration. 

* * * 

Perhaps Mr. Hearst would have done better had he not 
gone to the Santiago front, but remained at home and 
allowed bis correspondents to press the buttons. His dis- 
patch glorifying Honore Laine, one of his staff, for the 
cowardly and brutal murder of forty Spanish soldiers 
whom, under false pretences, he cajoled into surrender, 
has startled the people and Washington Government. Mr. 
Hearst indorsed Laine's deviltry, and it is not easy to see 
how he is going to excuse either his correspondent or him- 
self when the Government makes its promised investi- 
gation. 

* * * 

Taxing personal property in New York city is as great, 
if not a greater farce than the operation as conducted in 
San Francisco. The idea of multi-millionaires like the 
Vanderbilts, Astors and Goulds being assessed at say half 
a million dollars, is of course simply ridiculous. One corner 
in their city palaces would be cheap at such valuations. 
One reason for these low valuations is that if the assess- 
ments were at any figure approaching their real value, 
the millionaires would, in the language of the great un- 
taxed, "fly the coop" and pay no taxes at all. That is 
what George Gould does to evade taxation. He declares 
his residence and home to be in New Jersey, and foreigners 
cannot be taxed in New York. 

* * * 

"Andy" Clunie, California's irreproachable and inde- 
fatigable Insurance Commissioner, who was supposed to 
be booked for a New York residence during the summer, 
suddenly disappeared 'twixt the gloaming and the night 
last week, much to the surprise of the insurance people 
he was hauling over the coals. Judge Morrow, they say, 
did it with his little pen, and "Andy" is no longer the 
bug-a-boo he was when he made bis first appearance 
on Cedar street. If Judge Morrow's decision had been 
withheld a few weeks loDger Clunie would have enjoyed a 
summer picnic. "The best laid plans of men gang aft 

aglee." 

* * * 

The de Youngs left for home late last week after a pro- 
tracted Eastern s1 ay. Mr., de Young went to Washing- 
ton to see about the Paris Exposition Commissionership in 
person, and he soon had the entire Pacific Coast delega- 
tion, reinforced by other Western States, arguing with 
President McKinley for the appointment, and it now looks 
as if Californian Republicans would be awarded this recog- 
nition of Mr. de Young's merits. 

* * * 

"Tom" Keene, the tragedian, atone time a great favor- 
ite in California, who died recently, was reputed in his 
lifetime to be one of the few actors who had saved up 
money. Report in this respect proved an arrant liar. 
Now that poor Tom's a' cold it is learned that his entire 
leavings will not aggregate $1,500. More's the pity. 

New designs in Waist Sets, Links and Buttons. Sterling silver and 
silver gilded from 35 oents up. J. N. Brittain, Jeweler, 33 Geary street 

Kick if ycu don't get pure Jackson's Napa Soda. 



106 111 108; those were the figures representing the 
degrees at temperature under which big streams of per- 
spiration rolled down the brows of the just and the unjust 
in New York eitv on the 2nd, 3rd and 4tb days of July, 
respectively. The oldest inhabitant and his grandfather 
failed to remember such heat. If it was ever warmer it 
must have beeu before thermometers were made or 
Weather Bureaus organized. 

» * # 

Stray Californians in New York: Mr. and Mrs. E. F. 
Dyer, W. F. Babcock at the Manhattan; A. W. Hewlett, 
Park Avenue; Miss M. Eaton, Mrs. C. S. Fitzsimmons, 
Savoy; L. J. Richardson, W. F. Holden, St. Denis; A. M. 
Schweinfurth, W. Bradford, A. B. Bowers, Imperial; E. 
E. Caswell, Everett; J. W. Raphael, B. B. Thayer, Hoff- 
man; John Corrigan, Buckingham. 

* * * 

Usually the French steamships carry numerous Cali- 
fornians as passengers, but it so happened that Brother 
Ambrose of Sacramento was the only Coaster who sailed 
on La Bourgogne on her ill-fated trip when there was 
such a terrible loss of life. Several San Franciscans who 
intended going, but changed their minds, are now thank- 
ing their lucky stars. 

# * * 

Edna Wallace (ex-Hopper's) press agent is getting his 
work in. Following the phenomenal nose bleed which fol- 
lowed Edna's attempt to attain the high C, the papers 
are full of a terrible runaway accident in which she was 
the heroine, and from which she escaped, like Sampson's 
ships, unscathed. Nextl Entrb Nous, 



ON last Tuesday ex-Judge Eugene R. Garber, a prom- 
inent attorney of this city, died at the Waldeck Sani- 
tarium, to which place he was removed from the Palace 
Hotel for the purpose of having a surgical operation per- 
formed. Judge Garber was widely known in this State 
and Nevada, and bis unexpected death came to his many 
friends and the public as a great shock. He was 44 years 
old and in the very prime of a useful career. At the 
time of his death he was associated with his cousin, Hon. 
John Garber, in the practice of law? in this city, from 
whose home in Berkeley the funeral services were held on 
Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock. 



NOT an infrequent sight on these streets within the 
past month has been soldier boys with pistols 
strapped to their waists and cartridge belts filled with 
loaded shells. It is not apparent why these sanguinary 
displays are necessary in San Francisco. There are no 
Spaniards here to bayonet or pistol, and the assaults of 
the feminine part of the community upon the boys in blue 
hardly justify this violent defense. 

The king of Sweden is the tallest European monarch. 




Mixture 

Smohinq Tobacco ## 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 16, 1898. 




PIFA5URC5 yfa 



" We obey do wand but pleasure's." — Tom Moore. 



i.JE are so dishonest in our farces. 
Jl W We permit all the appearances and 
inconveniences of sin, only it must be 
distinctly understood at the outset that no sin has been 
committed. It is like a young man who likes to be seen 
slipping out of saloon doors but never had the courage to 
get drunk, Lost — 24 Hours, the farce by W. A. Tre- 
mayne and Logan Fuller, which the Frawleys are playing 
this week, is an instance. There are all the results of 
guilt, but the authors take care to tell us that there has 
only been an innocent flirtation; the wife is so jealous that 
if she suspected her husband of having flirted before their 
marriage she would never forgive him, he must keep the 
awful intelligence from her at any cost, and so he submits 
to be blackmailed by the lady with whom he flirted, 
— you know the kind of reasoning which English or Amer- 
ican audiences put up with to save their modesty. A 
French author would have been honest and made the inno- 
cent flirtation a scandal, and then there would be some 
cause for the effect. The play would be just the same, ex- 
cept that by presupposing a scandal its complications 
would be reasonable, according to the logic of farce, while 
by presupposing an innocent flirtation they are prepos- 
terous. But the morality of these rakish-looking people 
must be established before we can laugh comfortably at 
their adventures, they must only seem to be immoral. It 
is by such hypocrisies that we maintain the "clean and 
wholesome" drama and make the Frenchman hawser les 
ipaules. 

We make such odd distinctions in estimating sins. All 
the common sins may be laughed at except one. Liars, 
drunkards and thieves all make legitimate sport, their 
faults have no ethic al meaning in farce. But if we are 
not to be equally indulgent to all peccadilloes, why 
not be consistent add treat the liars, drunkards and 
thieves seriously and turn the farce into a tragedy? 
Lost — 24 Hours is a tragedy, you know, if you look at it in 
that way. The innocent young wife deceived by the hus- 
band she trusts and loves, the clergyman outraged in his 
holiest feelings by the same sad young dog of a husband, 
what bitter heartaches are theirs! But that's ridiculous. 
There are no heartaches in farce; you have to demoral- 
ize yourself before you can enjoy it. In farce there are 
no questions of morality, but only of taste. Ln«t — .'-I 
Hours is called a comedy, but it is frank farce until the 
melodramatic scene at the end, which is quite off the key 
of the play, when the blackmailing lady makes a bid for 
6erious sympathy by saying she "never had a charnce." 
* * * 

It is rather an amusing play, with the New York air of 
naughtiness indistinguishable from vulgarity. The dia- 
logue is bright and only occasionally inclined to be too 
smart. The first half of the play rattles much more suc- 
cessfully than the second, which has its tedious spaces. 
The religious people are rather jarring at times; that may 
be a matter of individual taste, but not so the business of 
crossing the parson's hands as if in death and laying a 
white flower on his breast, which is in positively atrocious 
taste. Mr. Edward M. Bell again gives a clever perform- 
ance of a sad young dog, a thoughtf il and interesting per- 
formance. Mr. Bell has not yet had his serious chance this 
season — for the last three weeks he has been playing most 
ungrateful parts, but bis comedy work is good ading. I 
think he is unrivaled as an exponent of the morning after. 
Mr. Louis Payne has an extravagantly farcical part as 
the parson, and his scenes with Mr. Bell and Miss Bouton 
are the best in the play. Miss Bouton plays her original 
part of the blackmailing lady with plenty of spirit, espec- 
ially in the second act, where nearly all her chances occur, 
but she has the bad habit of pointing her lines with mean- 
ingless exaggeration. Miss Campbell is sweet and ingen- 
ious as the siily little wifekin, and Mr. Edwards is amusing 
as a Frenchman, with an accent from anywhere. Mr. Hick- 
man, who has played his previous parts uncommonly well, 



seems ill-suited in the character of an obnoxious young 
man, who kisses his friend's wife and servant and does 
other things to match — in short, the part of a cad. All 
the people in the play are cads, except the wife, and she 
has no sense, poor little thing. Miss Tinnie is all she should 
be as a disgracefully pert servant maid. I didn't think 
much of the Quakeresses, not through any fault of Miss 
La Verne and Miss Winter; but through the misjudgment 
of the authors. 

I don't see why on earth "The Littlest Girl " was ever 
dramatized. It is a pretty enough story as Richard Hard- 
ing Davis wrote it, but there is nothing to make a play 
out of, as is very plainly shown in the performance, which 
is simply a conversation between Mr. Frawley as Van 
Bibber and Mr. Roberts as Caruthers. 

# # # 

Several years ago Faust gave Sir Henry Irving the op- 
portunity of his life for calcium light acting, the sardonic 
chuckle, the strange gait, the livid eye and all the tradi- 
tional Mephistophelean clap-trap in which he so much 
fancies himself. His production was very magnificent, 
and, of course, gave incomparable opportunities for 
spectacular staging which at the London Lyceum has 
reached the pinnacle of elaboration. But without a 
Lyceum setting and without a Sir Henry Irving the 
raison d'etre of this version of Faust expires. It is merely 
a performance of Gounod's Faust with the music left out. 
It bears the same relation to Goethe's Faust as the libretto 
of Gounod's Romeo on, I Juliet does to Shakespeare's play. 
In the Alcazar production the incompleteness of it is con- 
tinuously suggested by the orchestra which keeps on 
whispering snatches from the opera in the most tantalizing 
manner imaginable. The play is an old favorite of Mr. 
Lewis Morrison's and I have no doubt that he, in his hum- 
bler surroundings enjoys playing at Mephistopheles quite 
as much as Sir Henry Irving did. He, too, loves the calcium 
light, the sardonic chuckle, the strange gait, the livid eye 
business, but he has not the saving quality which redeems 
these vanities — the terribleness. Mr. Lewis Morrison is 
never terrible. He is a facetious devil, a thoroughly 
American devil, too harmless to provoke a single shudder. 
Mr. Frank Denithorne plays the part of Faust. Mr. Deni- 
thorne is a very handsome young man, and in the garb of 
Faust looks very picturesque indeed. If he could get more 
accustomed to being so good looking, he might act less 
like a wax work. He sustains each gesture for several 
seconds. Now he levels an eagle glance, (his eyes are 
very good), now he opens his mouth in the conventional 
listening attitude, (his teeth are excellent), anon he 
pirouettes in the third position of the waltz to make his 
cloak fly out behind, (Mr. Denithorne has a leg). He talks 
to match, with studied stiffness, which is also unfortu- 
nate, for God gave him a good voice. He says "The 
bo-n-n d-d" and sits down to sign it while Mr. Morrison 
reiterates "The bond-er." It is only fair to say that both 
these gentlemen are taken at their own valuation by the 
audience. Everything they do is received with unques- 
tioning rapture. The Alcazar audience is an ideal one 
from an actor's point of view, it is hardly silent a moment, 
and it never applauds by tapping the back of its right 
band on the palm of its left as more expensive audiences 
do, but hollows out both its palms and produces a good 
spanking noise, and it tills up the laughter gaps with 
prompt obedience. Mr. Lewis Morrison has helped a 
great deal in training it. Miss Roberts is a talented and 
charming actress and she has played every part well that 
I have seen her in, but I do not think that Marguerite is 
at all one of her best parts. She started off in the minor 
key. Marguerite seemed weighed down with sorrow from 
her first entrance. Her childish pleasure in the jewels 
seemed strange in such a sober maiden. The difference 
between the girl of the first two acts and the woman of 
the last three was not apparent. But Miss Roberts is 
charming in whatever she does and her voice is delicious. 
Mr. George Foster Piatt and Mrs. Bates did as well as 
could be expected with Valentine and Martha. Theirs is 
simply the old operatic business we know so well. None 
of the other parts have any importance. 

* * * 

The Tivoli is fast regaining its popularity and its old repu- 
tation as a place where one may go and hear the standard 



July 16, 1898. 



SAN FRANCISCO XI US LETTER. 



comic operas pleasantly performed. Miss Elvia I rox's is 
the only really pood voice in the company, giving 
this week, but they all work well in work worth S| riding 
their efforts on. Mr. Edwin Stevens is very raccessful in 
the part of the irascible old KantchukofT. which gives him 
a more legitimate chance than he generally gets. The 
pictorial effect of the first act is one of the best ever 
at the Tivoli. Next week /...« Cloche* •!• OarnevHk, about 
the most popular and certainly one of the prettiest of aii 
comic operas, will be revived, in which Mr. Stevens will 
play Gaspard. the miser, for the first time, and MissCrox 
will be the Serpolette. 

The Grand opera season begins in about a month. The 
following is a list of the principal singers engaged: 
Sopranos — Miss Marie Brandis from the Damrosch Opera 
Company and Miss Anna Lischter from the Castle Square 
Opera Company. Contraltos— Misses Mary Linck and 
Bernice Bolmes. who both sang with the Castle Square 
Opera Company during last season, and Miss Helcne Noldi. 
Tenors— Signor Roselli from Covent Garden Opera, and 
Mr. Thomas Green from the Castle Square Opera Com- 
pany. Baritones — Chevalier Maurice de Vries and Mr. 
William Pruett; and basso, Signor G. S. Wanrell. Puc- 
cini's La Bohlme and Manon Lescaut will be performed dur- 
ing the season and probably Verdi's Fahtaff. 

* * * 

The Orpheum bill has met with much favor this week. 
Mr. Bert Coote and Miss Julie Kingsley put some good 
work into a rather poor farce, and Mr. Hart and Miss 
de la Mar give one of the best turns of their kind, intro- 
ducing some good comic songs. Fleurette has renewed 
her triumphs, and Mrs. Shaw and her two beautiful du 
Maurier daughters are hailed with rapture upstairs and 
down whenever they appear. A more pleasant sight than 
this handsome trio is hard to find, in spite cf the twin's 
dresses, which provoked so much criticism from the press, 
but which I think they look charming in — they have some 
pink ones, too, which become them equally well. There 
will be a number of new turns next week. 

* * * 

R. C. Carton's Liberty Hall will be produced at the 
Columbia Theatre next Monday. 

Faust has done such enormous business at the Alcazar 
that it will be continued for another week. 



SN exceptionally fine opportunity for the purchase of 
valuable books will be presented next Monday even- 
ing, the 18th iost., at 8 o'clock, at the Association rooms 
of the I. O. O. F. Building, corner Seventh and Market 
streets. The em ire library of the Association is to be 
sold. The list includes 10,000 volumes of standard liter- 
ature, and takes in the whole range of history, the 
sciences, fiction, military and educational works. The 
books must be sold, and there can be no doubt that many 
of them will go for but a fraction of their value. 



THIS hot weather housewives are looking for comfort 
in the kitchen. The immense variety and utility of 
the gas stoves, ranges and gas attachments for ordinary 
ranges, for sale most reasonably by the San Francisco Gas 
Light Company, at 415 Post street, are meeting with 
great favor. They do away completely with the heat of 
coal or wood ranges, and are clean, quickly heated and 
quickly extinguished. Call at the company's gas stove 
department and look at the many fine styles to be seen 
there. 

Gail Borden Eagle Brand Condensed Milk. 
In 1856 Gail Borden introduced, condensed milk, and from small 
beginning an enormous industry has reiulteJ. The product ot tens, 
of thousands of cows is required to supply the. demands for this su- 
perior infant food. No other equals it. 

Health is frequently undermined and lives made miserable by the 
use of impure lood; and bread is often unwholesome because im- 
properly made. The whole wheat and gluten bread made at Swain's 
Bakery, 213 Sutter street, has all the qualities that assist digestion 
and give strength. Try it. Swain's system of delivery is perfect, 
and all orders are promptly filled. Delicious pastry of all kinds 
1 akes, crackers, etc., of the finest quality at Swain's. 

Midsummer line gent's furnithing goods in all styles at John W. 
Garmany's, 25 Kearny street. 

For a cool head— drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 




CAUSE and EFFECT. 



X;ti uriVs product-- 
Scientific Brewing, 
Perfect Bottling. 



Ale in Perfection. 
Sparkling, Frothy imd 
Mellow — Flans'. 



SHERWOOD & SHERWOOD. 

Pacific Coast Agents. 

Portland. San Francisco. Los Angeles. 



CI L ' TL J. The "Gem" Theatre of the Coast. 

OIUrTlDia I neatre, Friedlander, Gottlob&Co., Lessees 

Week of Monday, July 18th. The Frawley Company, presenting 
the great Empire Theatre success, 

LIBERTY HALL. 

An original modern play, telling one of the prettiest love stories 

ever t >ld on the stage, 

la Preparation: A Gallant Surrender. 

T| -_ I ' r\ 1—1 Mrs. Ernestine Krelirtg, 

I VOl I UDera riOUSe. Proprietor and Manager, 

Last nights of Von Suppe's favorite opera, Fatinitza. "March 

forward fearlessl3 ." 

Next week: One week only, Planquette's popular work, 

THE BELLS OF CORNEVILLE. 

A requested revival; a perfect nroducUon. 

In Preparation: "Amorlta," " The Golden Hea," "The Beggar 

Student." 

Box office always open. (No Phone.) Popular prices, 25c. and 50o. 

n I / T*L -L Fred Belasco, Lessee. 

r"\lCaZar I neatre. Mark Thall, Manager. 'Phone Main 254. 

This Saturday and to-morrow, Sunday, and all next week, Lewis 
Morrison's magnificent spectacular 

FAUST. 

Seats now on sale. Prices: 15c, 35c, 35c, 50c, reserved. 



Oi San Francisco's Greatest Mus 

r P n e U ITl . between Stockton and Powell £ 



San Francisco's Greatest Music Hall. 

"1 streets. 



Week commencing Monday, July 18th. 
stars and novelties. 



Great collection of new 



VALMORE, 

1 "The Instrumental Man"; Joseph Hart and Carrie De Mar, "The 
Quiet Mr. Gay"; Wilion & Slack, premiere horizontal bar ar- 
tists from Empire Theaire, London: Lorenz & Allen, eccentric 
comedians and dancers; Cooie& KingsJev, farce comedy art- 
ists; Mrs.\A.lir e J. Shaw and daughters, whistlingprima donnas ; 
Fleurette, terpsicborean wonder. 
Matinees Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday. 
Reserved seats 25c; balcony 10c; opera chairs and box seats 50c 

H. ISAAG dONES, M. D. 

Eye, Ear, Nose, and Throat. 

Office, 222 Post street, between Grant avenue and Stockton Sts., S . F. 
Hours, 10 A. m. to 4 p. m. Sunday. by appointment. 

• Tel. Grant 101. 



For Sale Cheap. 



STECK 
PIANO 



An elegant mahogany 

upright Steck piano, 

nearly new, will be 

sold for $300; cost $575. 

Address: "G. B." care this office 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 16, 1898. 



^^MrfcfrMvl^MtMMvfcMMMkWrMbivtnJMvtrU* 




HOME DECORATION- 

ftS a rule, windows suffer from too much drapery rather 
thao from too little. This is again partly due to the 
large plate-glass, for unconsciously one realizes the hope- 
lessness of such a blank, and attempts to cover it up and 
soften its glaring barrenness by several layers of lace and 
other millinery. So far is this carried that frequently the 
entire room is darkened and all facility for looking out 
destroyed. No such feeling is engendered by the small 
pane, which necessitates only the ieast amount of drapery 
to answer all requirements. For bedrooms and dining- 
rooms small sash-curtains of some washable fabric, with 
heavy curtains at the side, are sufficient. The latter 
should be arranged to draw at night, and in the daytime 
should hang in narrow strips at the sides of the window. 
A shallow valance overhead is frequently an improvement. 
At other windows straight breadths 
of net, Swiss or thin silk may hang 
over the windows, also supplemented 
by heavier curtains at the side. 
This may beof chintz, velours, worsted 
or any other soft and pliable material. 
Where sash-curtains are not neces- 
sary, outer ones of china silk may be 
used, thus affording an opportunity 
for emphasizing any desiied color. 
Various methods for tempering light 
can be given. An excellent plan is 
to have your windows fitted up well 
with green shades of good quality of 
linen. The edge can be fringed or 
not as preferred, but in either case 
the bottom hem should be a wide one. 
Another device equally attractive is 
having two shades, one closely set 
inside of the other. These affairs 
look well in brown and yellow. If 
light is needed, then the brown shade 
can be raised quite out of sight. If 
darkness is required, then both siades 
can be lowered. These shades are 
excellent for sea shore cottages in 
windows too small for canvas awnicgs. 
All these reflections make it evident 
that a square or oblong hole in the 
wall is cot, as many imagine, a 
window; and that the entire aspect of 
the house and all its charms and char- 
acter may be affected by the treat- 
ment which they receive. 



thought and care be expended in planning the doors and 
windows, it will be hardly necessary to provide any other 
ornamental architectural effects to the house, but allow 
it to sain its beauty and grace entirely from these most 

prominent features. 

* * * 

Japanese goat skin rugs are the most decorative, des- 
pite what their small value may be in dollars and cents, or 
any short of the guaranteed antiques. The long-haired 
white and black and gray rugs that we see spread about 
the floors are generally made from these Japanese goat 
skins, and their appearance is that of articles worth 
several times their real cost. For summer houses where 
matting is laid they are most appropriate and add very 
materially to the furnishing, their neat cleanly look make 
them pleasant to look upon and delightful under foot. 

Wam*ed —Pupils in elocution and reading; special attention to for- 
eigners: terms very reasonable. Room 3011. Hill Market street, cor. Sixth. 



I-ni eesoion dies where Jackson's Napa Soda lives. 
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decorative possibilities, but in almost 
every house have received some at- 
tention. Yet it is quite certain that 
the opportunities are not used to 
their full capacity. 

It must be remembered that a door 
with well-balanced panels, and one in 
which ih; wood, if unpainted, is 
selected with attention to the beauty 
of the grain, is a very ornamental* 
feature of a room. It should be u;i d 
as such, and though free from all fancy 
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In many of the old-time houses in 
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If, then, a little money and much 



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83 Mortimer St. Montreal: 28-30 Hospital S'. 



July 16, 1898. 



SAN l-RANCISCO N1CWS LETTER. 



/.'■*; N 




ms 



Ail. these wicked, wicked medical men, especially when 
they can put on uniforms ! Deadly fascinators. There 
is Potter, now. When Potter is in full rig he is p: 1 
than a ship under full sail, and when the doctor over at 
I.ime Point gets on to hid curves there will be no withstand- 
ing him. There was a crowd over at Lime Point the 
other day. A very proper and goody-goody crowd, and 
one was chiefly interesting because she bad had appendi- 
citis. Tbey would have preferred the < fticer from Yolo to 
have driven them back; but the gallant doctor was on 
deck, and the ex-appendicitis victim took the box-seat. 
What a conversation ! It was saturated with disease 
from one end of the journey to the other. From appendi- 
citis to paralysis, from consumption to cholera morbus, 
the profound medico and the mannish maid regaled them- 
selves, and edified their listeners with personal remin- 
iscences redolent of the hospital, the operating table, and 
the epidemic now prevailing in the camp at the Presidio 
and the Park. 



The immortal William warns us to 
beware of jealousy, but a lady who is 
pretty well known in our swim does not 
heed the bard's advice. She is furiously 
jealous of her husband, and lets all the 
world know that she is. He — man like 
— deceives her, but now and then she 
catches him, as she did last week. They 
live at the Palace, have choice rooms 
and troops of friends. Among the laf er 
is a fascinating widow (also w el- 
known in social life) who plays off she is 
the devoted friend of the wife while in 
reality she flirts with the husband on 
the sly. Last week she had been 

spending the afternoon with Mrs. 

and when the husband came in took her 
departure. This was all right in the 
wife's eyes but when the husband said he would ac- 
company the pretty widow to the elevator she flew 
to the inner bedroom window to see them pass 
and got there just in time to see the widow hand her 
husband a letter while looking cautiously toward the 
room they had just left, and now the swagger set are 
saying what an abominable shame it is the way Mrs. A 
carries on with Mr. B. It is the gossip of the hour. 

* * * 

Mr. RicharM Miner for Fairfax County, Virginia, now of 
Bodie, has lost a case over which he has been fighting for 
fourteen years, and as his fee would have been in the neigh- 
borhood of $75,000, he was the recipient of many regrets. 
"I don't mind," said Dick, as he stood up to the bar and 
ordered drinks all round — " I don't mind. What is earthly 
dross, after all? No, sir. I am not seeking wealth. I am 
doing far better. I am laying up treasures in heaven 
where the moths don't break in and steal." "Any bars 
there, Dick?" queried Sands Forman. "Ecod ! " cried 
Dick, "I never thought of that. I don't know — it strikes 
me that both places are pretty dry. I think I'll take no 
chances and stay on earth as long as I can, in any event. 
Thank you, Sands, for the hint," and there were tears of 
gratitude in the voice of the defeated Miner as he ordered 

a second round. 

* * * 

There is considerable speculation now that the Hawaiian 
Islands have been absorbed, what will become of Consul- 
General Wilder. He has "bad a good thing of it," in the 
language of the day — now will he be cast down? Mr. 
Charles is said to be one of the luckiest men of the day, 
and he calmly assures all fond inquirers that he will hold 
on for a year, at least. Does it mean that the annexation 
commission will lengthen out their settings for three hun- 
dred and sixty-five days? In the interests of some, it 
would be a wise proceeding. 




The military fever is spreading. Not content with plas- 
tering themselves with brass buttons, our young women are 
familiarizing themselves with words of command, and cer- 
tainly the short haired young lady, whose swain languishes 
for her among the palm groves of the Isles of the Blessed, 
creates somewhat of a sensation when she bellows out 
"halt" when addressing her fleeing male friends. As 
the hotel where she lives is somewhat frequented by the 
future hero, her shout brings to a sudden stop whole bat- 
talions of lieutenants, captains, and majors, who come to 
attention with a promptness that shows an intimate famil- 
iarity with the amazon's command. 

Blood tells in horses and men; quality tells in liquors. The 
quality of Arg.inaut and J. F. Cutter whiskies place them at the 
head ot all liquors. Wherever pure goods are wanted and appre- 
ciated one will always find Argonaut and J. F. Cutter. E.Martin 
A Co., 411 Market street, are sole agents for the Pacific Coast. 



Age cannot wither, nor custom stale the infinite variety of the 
Japanese art goods to be found at Geo. T. Marsh & Co.'s, fi25 Market 
street, under the Palace Hotel. Lacquer, satsuma, carved ivory, 
etc., quaint, interesting, artistic, popular. Look in. 



Jackson's Napa Soda knocks rheumatism. 




The . . 

"R. B. rlflYDEN" 

Fine old band-made Sour 
Mash Whiskey. On account 
of Its absolute purity and 
delicaoy of flavor is pro- 
nounced by connoisseurs to 
be without an equal, and is 
regarded by the medical fao- 
ulty as superior to all others 
(or the use of invalids. 

Having been 

BOTTLED IN BOND 

under supervision of the U. 
S. Government, age, proof 
and purity are guaranteed. 
The U. S. stamp precludes 
the possibility of adultera- 
tion, and consumers can ex- 
ercise their own judgment in 
diluting. 



Some papers . 
Print ... 
Some of the News 
Most of the Time. 
Most papers 
Print all ihe News 
Some of the time. 



THE GflLU 



Prints ALL THE NEWS 



All the Time. 



SUBSCRIPTION PRICE (Including Postage): 

Daily Call (including Sunday) 12 months, $6 00 

.. i. .. i. 6 " 3 00 

" " " 3 •' 60 

1 (g 

Sunday Call 12 " 150 

Weekly Call 12 " 150 

" " 6 " 75 

Sunday and Weekly Call 12 " 2 50 

Delivered by carrier every day, 65c. per month. 



JOHN D. SPREGKELS, 



Proprietor. 



DR. BYRON W. HAINES 



14 Grant Avenue 
Rooms 16-17-18-19 



Dentist 



d. D. SULLIUAN 

Attorney-at- Law 
Rooms 34-38, 3d Floor Chronicle Building, San Francisco. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




July i6, 1898. 



THE CHAMBER —juua c- r dorr 



ROOM where I so oft have slept, 
ll'ionj where I so oft have wept, 
Room wherein my dead have lain 
Wrapped away from care and pain, 
When my earthly day is done, 
Burdens dropped and rest begun, 
Life and thought and being fled— 
Who will love thee in my stead? 
Who will make thee fair and sweet- 
Bid the sun thy casements greet— 
Open all thy windows fair 
To the incense-laden air— 
From the garden bring the rose, 
And at daylight's dreamy close 
See the moon's pale splendor fall 
On the chamber's inmost wall? 

1 would charm thee, if I could. 
Unto all that's bright and good, 
For her sake who after me 
Sometime shall find rest ta thee. 
I would weave a spell so rare — 
Half a rhyme and half a prayer— 
That nor grief, nor pain, nor sin, 
Through thy doors should enter in! 

If she dreameth maiden dreams, 
Be they calm as sunlit streams ; 
If in some far, golden year, 
A young mother shall lie here 
With a fair child on her breast, 
Cradled into softest rest, 
Lo! I charge thee, for my sake, 
Holy care of her to take. 

If some woman, half dismayed, 
Here shall see her beauty fade, 
See a shadow slowly pass 
o'er her image in the glass. 
Comfort her, I pray thee! Spread 
Wings of peace above her head- 
Bid thine angels guard to keep 
Over her, the while I sleep! 

THE WIND UPON A SUMMER DAY.-*, t. van vorst, in scribner'i 

The wind upon a summer day 
How sweet it stirreth in the trees! 
The shifting shadows as they lie 
Across the fields, the bending rye 
The blue flowers in the grain, and you 
To love the livelong summer thro' — 
There are no sweeter things than these. 

The dawning of a winter's day 
How sad it is ! The leafless trees, 
The frozen meadow-lands that lie 
All cold beneath the snowy sky — 
The old year's bitterness; and you 
To lack the livelong winter thro' 
There are no sadder things than these ! 

THE BLAC KBIRD — w. e. henley- 

The nightingale has a lyre of gold, 

The lark's is a clarion call, 
And the blackbird plays but a box-wood flute. 
But I love him beet of all. 

For his song is all of the joy of life, 
And we in the mad spring weather, 

We too have listened till he sang 
Our hearts and lips together. 

THE SWEETEST SONG.— the trumpeters and other poems. 

That song is sweetest, bravest, best, 

Which plucks the thistle-barb of care 

From a despondent brother's breast. 

And plants a sprig of beart's-ease there. 



A POET'S EPITAPH -clarence urmy. 

A life with day-dreams and night visions fraught: — 
But, oh ! the good these dreams and visions wrought. 



v>^ 






^mriERRESORj^ 




Jiot^l £1 pa$o d^ I^obl^s 



Under new management 



BEST CURATIVE 

AND BATHING 

WATERS 

IN AMERICA 

Cuisine First Class. 



Appointments unsurpassed. Tub, plunge. mud 
and swimming baths In most powerful sul- 
phur waters in the world, insuring quick 
and permanent cures for rheumatism, liver, 
kidney and skin diseases. Magnificent re- 
treat for pleasure and recreation. Very hot 
sulphur Mud Baths, 122 P.; Soda Springs, 
77 F.; main Sulphur Spring. 107 F Terms 
$10 to $28 per week. Two blocks from rail- 
road station. Further particulars apply to 
Traveler, 20 Montgomery street, or 
Otto E. Never, Prop., Paso Robles, Cal. 




jHoteis Qazad^ro ai?d Eli|T\ ()rou^. Manage. 

IN BEAUTIFUL SONOMA COUNTY 

Gateway to Paradise, at terminus North 
Pacific Coast R. R. Nostaging; only ten 
miles from ocean; hotels short mile apart 
under one management; best of attention, 
bowling riding, tennis, driving, fishing, 
shooting and outdoor swimming Open 
all year. Rates. $8 to $14 per week. 
Further particulars, 
F. M. Child, Manager, Cazadero. 

Or at 504 Kearny treet, S. F., room 10 
CALIFORNIA S IDEAL BIG TREE AND FAVORITE RESORT. 

^Pacific Congress Springs, 

SANTA CRUZ MOUNTAINS, 
SANTA CLARA COUNTY, 

Remodeled and under new management. 

A new swimming tank has just been completed--175x80 ft. 

It lakes O hours and J. dollars to get there. 

JOHN S. MATHESON, Manager. 



S/tuSicon Springs, 

On Rubicon River, 10 miles from 

McKtnney's. LAKE TAHOE. 

Primitive, clean hr me cooking. 
New management: new furnishing; 
new stages; tine fishing and boating 
on river and lakes; the drive to the 
springs is the most picturesque for 
est drive in California. These springs 
are noted for mediciral value in stom- 
ach, liver, end kidney troubles, and 
relief for obesity. 

$7 to 10 per week 

A. ABBOTT, Manager, 




The Discoverer of Rubicon Springs. 



IF VAII flRF CC C 1^1 |U/^ f°r a delightful and healthful resort 
||| / vU ni\L OfcLlYinU for the summer months for vour fam- 
ily, not so remote from town but that 
you can be with them without neglecting your business; 

If you are in search of a good table and comfortable sleeping apartments 
only an hour and a half's travel from San Francisco with half-hourly com- 
munication, day and evening; 

If it is your wish to confine your summer's outing by a moderate outlay 

your attention is directed to flflWIfflRDS PARK, 

At the terminus of the Oakland, San Leandro and Ha/wards Electric Ry. 
Or if you are fond of tenting here you will find a large number of commodious 
platforms arranged convenient to the hotel dining room, on one of which 
you may erect your tent : 

A choice musical programme is rendered every Sunday afternoon on the 
veranda of the club-house. The cars of the company run Into the Park. The 
monthly commutation rate is only $5; room and board $8 per week; board 
for campers $5 per week. Campers and roomers have the same service from 
attendants. Address, MRS. DORA SHANE, Haywards Club House. 



IS YOUR 

TITLE 

PERFECT? 



If you have any doubt, consult the 

California Title Insurance and Trust Go. 

Insurance policies guaranteeing titles to be 
perfect Issued and abstracts made and con- 
tinued. Money to loan os real estate 
Office— Mills Building. 



Henry L. Davis. President. Chas. D. Stuart, Secretary. 



The St. Jtelepa 5 a 9'tarium. 

Its special features uorlrnled and not found elsewhere on the coast. 
SCENERY. Located amid grov» s on the western ilOpQ of Howell Mountain. 
It overlooks the beautiful Napa Valley in Its most charming section. 
Premises include sixty acres of well Kept lawns, beautiful gardens, and 
extensive groves of pine, live oak m&droua. t harming walks and drives. 
EQUIPMEN'. Buildings consist of a main Bve-Mory structure, the "New 
Cottage," and ten other well-equipped buildings. Including cottages, gym- 
nasium chapel, laboratories, natatorlum. besides thirty tents. W-n fur 
nisbed. steam heaud. electric calls elevator, complete scientific appara- 
tus. Every accompaniment of a well-conducted institution of its kind. 

SERVICE. Three regular physicians, thirty trained nurses, forty assist- 
ants: sumptuous and classified dietaries; skilled operators for application 
of massage. Swedish movements, and all kinds o' electric and water 
treatm nt. Infectious and offensive patients not received. 

Address, ST. HELENA SANITARIUM. St Helena. Cal. 



Jtotel BepueQue, 



LAKEPORT, CAL. 



^dams Sprigs. 




LAKE COUNTY. 

Best Water in the World for STOM 

ACH. LIVER, and KIDNEY 

TROUBLES. 

Long Distance Telephone. 
Take Southern Pacific R. R., 
foot of Market street. Round 
Trip Tickets, S 0. 
For further particulars, address 
Dr. W. R. Prather, Prop. 



5ei$Ier Sprigs, 

^— LAKE COUNTY, CAL, 

This de.ightrul wateringiplace is located In the midst of the Coast Range. 

/Ibundanee of (T\irjeral Sprir^s. 

Hot and cold plunge baths, large swimming tank of mineral water, line 
stone dining room; telephone connections, electric lights, livery accom- 
modation; good trout fishing ai-d hunting, Round trip tickets at Southern 
Pacific offices, $ 10. 

Joh.* SPAULDrNO. Proprietor 

J Wallace Spaulding, Manager. 

flQdersoi} Sprigs. 

Only natural Mineral Steam Baths In 

LAKE COUNTY. 

Hot Sulphut and Iron Baths. 
Board : $8 to 814 per week. Baths Free. P ddress, 
J. Anderson, Anderson Springs, 

Mlddletown, Lake County, Cal. 
" Fare, San Francisco to Springs and return re- 
duced to 88. Send for circular. 

4^ .ftill particulars at "Traveler," 20 Montgomery St., S. F. 




•LAKE COUNTY, CAL 



BEST PLACE IN CALIFORNIA FOR HEALTH OR PLEASURE, 

Thirty of the greatest mineral springs in America; all kinds of amuse- 
ments: -aew swimming tank, baths and bowling alley. First-class accom- 
modations; rates reasonable; write for illustrated pamphlets. 

San Francisco office, 316 Montgomery street. 
Address, Highland Springs, Cal. 



J-iarbir} 



4X*ff>ftti 



LAKE CO., CAL 



JHot Sulphur arjd 
Iroij Spripcjs. 

Most accessible and most desirable. 
Stage daily from Caltstoga to Springs. Round trip 
tlokets at Southern Paolno Office. (8. Fine hunting 
and fishing. , _. 

Absolutely wonderful waters ; all kinds of skin dis- 
eases oured in marvelously short time; kidney, 
liver, and stomaoh troubles immediately relieved; 
rates $10 to »18 per week. Long Distanoe telephone. 

Address, J. A. Hays, Proprietor, 

Lake County, Cal. 



LAKEPORT'S LEADING SUMMER RESORT. 

Situated overlooking the shore on Clear Lake. Hotel and grounds 
cover two full blocks; spocial facilities for accommodating famines with 
children; well-furnished coltagos for those who desire thorn; home cook- 
ing, boating, bathing, hunting, and superior fishing; no Chinese employed. 

FRANK & A. M. SCALES, Proprietors. 



(ilepbrooK, lake co.. cal. 

REMEMBER— I f you want to hunt; if jou want 
to fish; If you want to recuperate; If you want 
the best of recreation; if you want pure air and 
sunshine; ifyouwantto enjoy an exhilarating 
climate, COME TO GLENBROOK 

O. W. R. Tredway, Prop. Glenbrook Hotel. 




>araiso T 



MONTEREY COUNTY, CAL. 

The Carlsbad of America. 

For health, rest, pleasure, olimate. accommodations scenery, flower 
beds cleanliness, table, hot soda, tub and plunge baths, hot sulphur tub and 
swimming tanks, massage treatment, special bath houses for ladies and 
lady attendant, hunting and fishing, children's playground, croquet, lawn 
tennis, and dance hall. >or families Paraiso stands unsurpassed in the 
State. Plenty of enjoyment for young and old. Take train at Third and 
Townsend streets, San Francisco, 9 a. m.. and at Oakland from First and 
Broadway at 9:10 a. m. daily for Soledad. Return trip ticket 88, to be pro- 
cured at the Southern Pacific office, 613 Market street, under Grand Hotel. 
Seven miles by stage. Telephone and post office. 

For illustrated pamphlets and special inducements for 1898, address 
R. ROBERTSON, Lessee and Manager. 

H...,,,^ j f*^_:_j,** pioturesquely situated amidst the pine 
OU/3ld SPriDQS. forests of Lake County— the Switzer- 
S\ * 7 land of America- elevation 2300 feet. 

No fog ; climate perfect Natural hot 
mineral plunge and tub baths, fine medici- 
nal drinking water. Excellent fishing and 
hunting. Post office and telephone on the 
premises. Rates, $10 and $12 with special 
terms for families Accommodations, 
table and service first-class. Round trip 
from San Franoisco via Napa, Calistoga, 
$10, including fine stage drive. 

For accommodations and further particu- 
lars address 

Mrs. R. J. Beeby, Prop., Putah P.O. 




Qarlsbad. 



MOST BEAUTIFUL SPOT IN LAKE COUNTY. 



The mineral springs are well known for marvelous cures when every- 
thing else failed, especially in cases of stomaoh, liver, kidney and bladder 
affections. Good bathing; new hotel; superior accommodations; i]>8to$l.j 
per week; roads excellent; good trout Ashing and deer hunting on prop- 
erty. For particulars write W. R. McGOVERN, Carlsbad, Lake County. 



rJ^W/M-A'r KiflbORT. Pleasantly located in 
nODcry S a pine forest three thousand five 
I O s hundred feet altitude ; highest 

elevation, lowest price. First- class family table and 
pleasant rooms, seven to eight dollars per week; 
surrounding scenery unsurpassed by any springs in 
the immediate vicinity. Stage daily. Buy ticket 
direotfor Hoberg's, Lake County, Cal. 

George Kammereb, 
Mrs. M. Hoberg, 

Proprietors. 



PAH3H73 Cnrinrtc LAKE COUNTY, CAL A natural camping 
OVl]aiJ£.a ^pilyy©. ground: 5 different mineral and 2 pure water 
springs. We cater tooampers only. Fishing 
and hunting; cottages to rent, $1.50 up per week; pure water piped to each 
cottage. Hot and Cold Mineral Baths. All necessaries- can be purchased 
on the grounds; hammooks, swings, and croquet; summer houses in shady 




groves. 



R. F. Dockery, M. D. Dockery, Proprietors. Putah P. O. 



" JCenilworth Snn. 



A New and Strictly First-Class Hotel. 

Steam heat, electric lights, and running water in every room ; billiards , 
croquet, tennis, and shuffle-board. Saturday night hops; one hour from 
San Francisco; in beautiful Mill Valley; 'bus to and from trains. 

W. E. VEAZIE, Proprietor, Mill Valley, Marin County, Cal. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 1 6, 1898. 




*$Bl&f/iuRE:i//EVf 



The Solons, representing the people at 
Taxation Which Washington, have worked more havoc 
Means Ruin. with one portion of the business men 
of the nation than a foreign invasion 
could have effected. The Western mining operators have 
been taxed out of their avocation and can now whistle for 
a living. Whether they intended this is an open question 
as yet, but in ruling on the new law, Commissioner of In- 
ternal Revenue Scott implies that they did. It is a new 
way in raising a revenue to cut it off entirely, and that is 
what Mr. Scott in his great wisdom has done. Instead of 
tax sales of stock and bonds ad valonm, at two cents on 
the $100, he has established the iniquitous precedent of a 
ta:; on fictitious values, and in addition insists that a com- 
pany with a small capital must pay as much as another 
capitalized at ten times the amount. The incorporation 
with shares worth $1 each on paper must pay a tax on 
$100, representing an increase on the basis of the capital- 
ization of 1110,000 shares, usual with companies of the kind, 
of $9,0(10,000 in the case of $1 stock. Under such circum- 
stances people must forfeit the ; r stock. They cannot sell 
it, for no one will buy with the knowledge that in order to 
dispose of it again they will be subject to the same ex- 
orbitant tax. The Western Stock Exchanges have 
already come to a full stop, and while the brokers are 
suffering, they are only in the miuority compared with the 
great mass of people, who stand to lose every dollar they 
have invested. Fortunately there is an appeal open 
through the courts of the uation, but sufficient time must 
lapse before any decision can be obtained to ruin thousands 
of people all over the country. Mining must also stop in 
the leading districts of the West. The shareholders pay 
for development work, and assessments cannot be col- 
lected on stock which cannot be either bought or sold on 
account of this outrageous system of taxation. No one 
would begrudge the money for the purposes of the Gov- 
ernment were its methods just and fair to all, but when it 
comes down to arbitrarily assessing citizens on a million 
dollars, when they are not worth as many cents, il is 
another question entirely. No one with any sense will 
credit for a momen', that the Goverument ever contem- 
plated anything of the kind. The Act itself has to be 
twisted and contorted to arrive at any such conclusion. 
The particular clause dealing with this class of taxation 
says, plainly enough, that "sales, agreements and mem 
oranda of sales" shall bear a tax of two cents on each $luo 
value or fraction thereof, the reference to sales, transfers 
and deliveries of shares or certificates of stock 1 
been interjected by the framers in the customary form of 
legal verbiage used in connection with "sales, agreements 
to sell, and memoranda of sales" of the kind. It is de- 
scriptive and nothing else, designating the subject of tax- 
ation, different in its character from ~nerchandisr, etc. 
However, this is neither here nor there; Mr. Seott has 
ruled that the face value of the stock and not its selling 
value must be taxed, and his word is law until it can be 
changed. Not content with this, he still further insists 
that the low face value must be swelled by multiples of 
100, a brainy suggestion which he will iin-1 it rather diffi- 
cult to carry into effect In the meantime, and until re- 
lief is obtained, little revenue can be expected from tax- 
ation on stocks and shares. 

Money, of London, says there is a possi- 
Ogiivie May bility of an Ogilvie Klondike Company 
Bioasom Out. b ibbing up in that quarter. If so, be has 
been thundering to good purpose in warn- 
ing against bogus companies. It will prove method in his 
actions for some time past in a semi-official connection 
with the authorities at Ottawa, which have occa- 
more or less comment. It will be presumed, of course, 
that the good Mr. Ogilvie is not apt to lead any one into a 
snare like the objects of personal criticism, who, on their 
part, have done yeomen's service in advertising the Cana- 
dian official had he really an axe to grind in London town. 



A London contemporary which might 
Where Ignorance be credited with knowing something 
Proves Dangeious. about mining matters, in a learned 
disquisition of a patronizing charac- 
ter on the prospects for gold mining in California, speaks 
of the " theory of the Mother Lode stimulating the imagi- 
nations of the mining people of the West." It then 
gravely remarks that " it is held to be an established fact 
that the lodes (sic) increase in richness as they go down in 
depth. Several shafts are now in course of being sunk, 
and this view will shortly be either established or refuted 
with abundance of evidence." This, too, from an editorial 
standpoint. One would think that a paper, which num- 
bers among its readers hundreds of people interested in 
California mining at one time or another, would be able to 
find some one able to enlighten it on the subject. The 
"Mother Lode" is an established fact and not a theory. 
It docs not run from the Klondike to Mexico. It is not an 
established fact that the lodes (there is only one) increase 
in riches as they go down in depth, but it is a fact that re- 
quires no further establishment, nor evidence, that the 
lode does go down. The question of depth has been solved 
years ago. It is little wonder that the same paper swal- 
lowed with becoming gravity the yarn about the mountain 
of gold ore out here worth millions of dollars, which it sug- 
gested as a rare nppnrtunitv for investors in the Great 
Northern Industrial Gold Mining Company, magnified fn in 
a little $00,000 property in Plumas County. It will ac- 
count, however, for the manner in which the people of 
Great Britain have been swindled by sharpers, bringing 
our mines and all connected with them into bad repute. 

Business in the mining share market 
Pine Street has Stopped, and it is a question of time 
In the Dumps, until, in the interests of economy, mines 
must be shut down on the Comstock- 
Brunswick lodes. Money cannot be obtained to work 
them now that the war tax has interfered with the sale of 
shares. Consequently miners will be thrown out of em- 
ployment, not only in Virginia City, but all over the West 
in the great mining centers. Tradesmen who gained a 
living by selling supplies of all kinds to the mines will also 
be forced to seek another market for their wares or go 
out of business altogether. Provided relief comes soon, 
the trouble may be tided over. If not, the history of many 
another flourishing Western town on which evil times has 
fallen may be repeated. The brokers so far have remained 
supine under the rulings of the revenue men, and their 
position has not been improved by auy legislation on the 
part of their own organization, which seems powerless in 
the emergency. With the brokers, helpless clients sutler 
if anything more severely. They have been forced to take 
up accounts or get out at a loss, and their shares now, 
barred as thev are from market privileges, are useless 
from a monetary basis. It is a miserable condition of 
affairs, and absolutely unwarranted. 

The United States produced last year, ac- 
Cooper >s in cording to statistics, more than one-half 
Demand. of the copper output of the world. Its 
share was 231.421 tons, out of a total pro- 
duction of 418,077 tons. This is said to be the largest an- 
nual yield reported, but, in face of it, the stock on hand 
has decreased. The home consumption and exportation 
have been well in excess of the production, a healthy sign 
for the miner, who can always find a market for his goods 
while this condition exists. This will give an incentive to 
the development of mines of this character, if the fact that 
properties being in demand does not lead the owners to 
place exorbitant prices upon prospects which warrant the 
investment of capital. Unfortunately, this is too often 
the case, and industries languish under a mistaken policy 
which would seek five dollars fi>r every one in sight. 

Miners along the Mother Lode are be- 
Water Now ginning to complain of a dry season, and 
Running Short, from all accounts many of the big prop- 
erties may be forced to suspend opera- 
tions where steam power is not available. This is one of 
the difficulties which the miner must face occasionally, and 
some of them are prepared for an emergency of the kind. 
But the majority are not, and they suffer from the incon- 
venience and deiay. Among the reported suspensions of 
operations is the Utica, which is expected to close down 
early next month for repairs. 



I 



July 16. iSgS. 



FRANCISCO NEWS I.KTTKR. 







• Heir I he Crier!" "What the deril»rt thou I' 
Onelh»t will oI»T thedetrll. sir. with you." 



► 



COLONEL RAABE is blessing the Fourth of July Com- 
mittee. Thete are some unpaid bills connected with 
that nice little outing on the bay which have not yet been 
settled, and those owed are foaming at the mouth. When 
Colonel Raabe formulated the invitations for his aquati. 
picnic he decided upon getting a fine State tug for the 
committee's pleasure, but failing, he worried along with 
the ancient Chilkat. Now, the Chilkat's engineer was on 
a holiday, and as the vessel could not be sailed without an 
engineer, Raabe hunted the waterfront for one. He came 
across engineer May. No; May was going home to his 
family and there enjoy a holiday. Raabe held up glitter- \ 
ing promises, and finally offered Mm a large $4 to take 
them out. May consented. When the picnic ended May 
asked for that large $4. "I'll send you a check," said 
Raabe, grandly. The check is yet coming, and engineer 
May. who neither had been presented with a turkey, a can 
of sardines, or a cheese, is making Raabe actually grow 
thin pestering him for that four dollars. 

THE gigantic Mr. Colnon locked horns with the South- 
ern Pacific Company, and the company yielded to Mr. 
Colnon. The Commissioner himself ordered torn away the 
barricades the Southern Pacific Company had placed to 
keep our timid women from going upstairs in the new 
ferry building. Colnon to the rescue of women, and Col- 
non wins. Few people know it, but really there is a great 
deal of gallantry among the employees of the Board. There 
is the Fifth Commissioner! He is quite a lady's man; so 
is Mr. Colnon, the First Commissioner. Then as to George 
Root, there is not a woman who can withstand that droop- 
ing curl over his left eye-brow, and Captain Phil E. 
Browne is the greatest ladies-man of the lot, so no wonder 
Mr. Colnon locked horns with the Southern Pacific. Ladies 
of San Francisco, you really ought to show your true ap- 
preciation of Commissioner Colnon. 

HERE is a chance for an accident insurance company. 
A raucous-voiced young woman in the neighborhood 
of tbirty-five long and dry summers has been promising to 
secure a pledge from her many admirers who hasten with 
speedy steps away from her to horse-whip a mild and in- 
nocent man because said young man is not as attentive as 
of yore. "Hell hath no fury" etc. It is a vast and cry- 
ing pity that the fast ageing beauty should so increase her 
wriakles in rage over a lost cause. And only in the shape 
of a kindly warning it is said that there may be a retort 
made which t"he spinster can ill afford to receive. There 
are too many women whose license of tongue needs a curb- 
ing and this particular one with her long and fanciful 
stories of the men who have proposed to her, and who 
have sought a smile from her on bended knees, when the 
hunting has been the other way, may get a trifle weary of 
her as do most of her friends upon whom she fastens her 
unremitting attentions. 

WHAT awful mysteries does Lime Point unfold. The 
military authorities are as jealous of Lime Point as 
is the Mahommedan of the beauties of his seraglio. A cer- 
tain Major Kellogg, of distinguished mien and cavalry 
bearing, strolled toward Lime Point last Sunday, and at- 
tempted to pass into the sacred enclosure. The Major 
was in the dress of a civilian. He was stopped. "lam 
Major Kellogg," said that officer in almost as haughty a 
way as Col. Kowalsky. "I don't care if you are. You 
can't get in here," replied the soldier, and Major Kellogg 
strode away with the dignity of a defeated Don. 

CAPTAIN BARNES, in all the glory of a brand new 
uniform, paraded the streets the other afternoon. 
Now the Captain has a martial figure in plain and ordi- 
nary dress, but when he fastened onto himself his military 
harness, sad to relate smiles were showered on him — not 
the smile of approval, but the smile that makes the corners 
of the mouth "curl with undisguised merriment. The Cap- 
tain is a Falstaffian fighter and a joy forever. 



ON K of 
in all s 







our alleged essayists asks 
seriousness: "Do men marry 
for money?" Oh, no! They marry 
for love. Why. of course. Who ever 
heard of an American man mirrying 
for money ? It is only such cattle as 
Englishmen that marry for money. 
And yet it is not quite without 
interest to note the few men in our midst whose 
hearts have worshiped at the shrine where riches and 
beauty go together. Let us begin. There is Jim Tucker 
Porter Ashe, Gaston Ashe, E. Bruguiere, Theodore Payne, 
Captain Payson, Douglas Dick, De Guigne, Frank Sher- 
man, Cunningham, ihe great Searles, and this is but a few 
of the many. These men, of course, did not marry for the 
money there happened to be attached to the girl, but 
purely for the great love that was implanted in their 
hearts! No, Mr. Essayist, or Mrs. Essayist, or Miss Essay- 
ist, do turn that rare mind of yours to subjects less ab- 
struse. 

SOMEWHAT of a sardonic grin overspreads the feat- 
ures of the not- totally-soldier-enamored when reading 
last Wednesday of the narrow escape of a Mr. Ransome, 
who insulted a soldier. In the same sheet was a story of 
how a Mr. Pile, from Angel Island, tried to kill two police 
officers and made a bad man of himself generally, and 
another story of how a soldier shot himself by accident. 
Ye gods ! What does the man feel who is struck by a 
soldier for drinks, for a smoke, for a car-fare, and there 
are many reputable house-holders in town who say that 
there are soldiers going from house to house begging! 
Now assuredly this is disgusting, and it is the plain duty 
of a commanding officer to make a severe example of such 
men. There is no need of this begging business. Most of 
these men have rever been so well off. They are housed, 
clothed, and fed, and as for drill — well, they are getting 
precious little of it nowadays. 

THERE is a very irate woman in town, and she wants 
a clerk horsewhipped ! Unhappy clerk ! It appears 
that the young woman met another woman who has a 
thrift}' turn of mind, and who showed to her how easily a 
man can dress well, and at what small cost. She simply 
took a pair of her husband's trousers, got the measure, 
trotted down town and bought a nice, ready-made pair for 
next to nothing. The seeker after information determined 
to follow this all-wise plan. She is a pretty little thing, 
with golden hair, blue eyes, and a meek and gentle voice, 
and a timid, dove-like manner. " I want," said she to the 
clerk, "a pair of trousers," and she blushed. "Yes, 
ma'am," was the answer, and then he gave an insinuating 
glance and cheerily asked, "Gents ? " Then did the woman 
turn away and seek out her husband, claiming that she 
had been insulted. The naughty clerk still lives. 

MAJOR Ben Truman, regarding whose existence there 
is much doubt, is still alive. He exists and in Los 
Angeles. It has been thought that he was dead. It is 
false. The Majah is inditing pastorals for weeklies, social 
screeds, and also old-time reminiscences. This is the man- 
ner in which he speaks of the late Misses Holladay, one of 
whom is now married, living in London. "These girls 
were perfect and compact in figure, and their faces were 
radiantly expressive, with not a single doubtful line or 
feature." Oh, no, there was no doubt about their having 
faces — none whatsoever; but, Majah, you had better not 
try to be too explanatory. 

IF there is anybody so sceptical as to think that the Gov- 
ernment has not been badly swindled with regard to the 
uniforms furnished the soldiers here, he should go to Camp 
Merritt and look at some of the boys who have been lately 
outfitted. It can hardly be believed that such open fraud 
would be committed. There should be some punishment 
meted out to these rascally contractors. These swindlers 
hoped that the men would be soon on the high seas, and 
that their rascality would not be detected. The daily 
papers ought to publish the names of these contractors 
and hold them up to execration. But the fear of losing a 
small advertisement is quite enough to shut the mouth of 
any daily in the city. 






'4 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



BANKING. 



Bank ol British Columbia. { f B £?Z?s;\Sfr a %X?£.f& 

Capital Paid Up $3,000,000 Reserve Fund I 500,000 

HEAD OFFICE. 60 Lombahd Street, London 

Branches— Victoria, Vancouver, New Westminster, Kamloops, Nan- 
lamo, Nelson, Sandon, and Kaslo, British Columbia; Portland, Oregon 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened sub- 
Jeot to Check, and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted 
available in all parts of the world. Approved Bills discounted and ad- 
vances made on good collateral security. Draws direct at ourrent rates 
upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents, as follows: 

New York— Merchants' Bank of Canada ; Chicago— First National Bank ; 
Liverpool— North and South Wales Bank; Scotland— British Linen 
Company; Ireland— Bank of Ireland; Mexico— London Bank of Mexico; 
Sodth America— London Bank of Mexico and South America; China and 
Japan— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China; Australia and 
New Zealand— Bank of Australasia and Commercial Banking Company of 
Sydney, Ld; Demerara and Trinidad (West Indies)— Colonial Bank. 

Also on Dawson City, Yukon District, arrangements having been made 
with the Canadian Bank of Commerce whereby it is prepared to issue 
drafts and Letters of Credit on that Bank at above point, and transact 
other banking business. Terms upon application. 

San Francisco Savings Union. 

532 California Street. 

Deposits, Julyl, 189H $25,356,130 Reserve Fund *182,0Cl» 

Paid-Up Capital 1,000,000 Contingent Fund 435.515 

E B. POND, President W. C. B. De FREMERY, Vice-President 

LOVELL WHITE, Cashier. 

Directors: George W. Beaver, Thomas Magee, W. C B de Fremcry, Al- 
bert Miller, Robert Watt, George C. Boardman, Daniel E. Martin, George 
Tasheira, E. B. Pond. 

Loans upon San Francisco and Oakland Real Estate, and Farms and 
Farming Lands In theCountry. 

Receives Deposits. Country remittances may be made in checks payable 
in San Franols",o. Post Office or Wells Fargo & Co 's Money Orders, or coin 
by Express, but the responsibility of this bank commences only with the 
receipt c I the money. 

No charge Is made for pass book or entrance fee 

Office Hours : 9 a. m. to 3 p. m , and Saturday evenings, for receipt of de- 
posits only, 6:30 to 8 o'clock. 

Bank of California, San Francisco. 

Capital and Surplus, $6,000,000 

WILLIAM ALVORD President I CHARLES R. BISHOP. .Vlce-Pres't 

ALLEN M.CLAY Secretary THOMAS BROWN Cashier 

S. Prentiss Smith... Ass 't Cashier 1 1. F. Modlton 2d Ass' t Cashier 

CORRESPONDENTS. 
New York— Messrs. Laldlaw & Co.; the Bank of New York, N. B A. 
Baltimore— The National Exchange Bank. Boston— The Tremont Na- 
tional Bank; Chicago— Illinois Trust and Savings Bank; Union National 
Bank. Philadelphia— Philadelphia National Bank. St. Lodis— Boat- 
man's Bank. Virginia City (Nev.)— Agency of The Bank of California 
London— Messrs. N. M. Rothschild & Sons; Paris— Messrs. de Roths- 
child Freres Berlin— Direction der Dlsconto Gesellschaft. China, 
Japan and East Indies — Chartered Bank of India. Australia and China. 
Australia and New Zealand — The Union Bank of Australia, Ltd., and 
Bank of New Zealand. 
Letters of Credit Issued available in all parts of the world. 

The San Francisco National Bank, 

Southeast Corner of Pine and Sansome streets, S. F. 
Jas. K. Wilson, President. E A. Brugciere, Vloe-Presldent. 

Lewis I. Cowoill, Cashier. F. W. Wolfe, Assistant Cashier. 

Capital $500,000 

Directors: Jas. K. Wilson, D. J. Staples, Wm Pierce Johnson, Geo. 
A. Pope, E. A. Bruguiere, Ed. G. Lukens, Charles C. Judson. 

Agents: New York— Hanover National Bank, Chase National Bank; 
Boston— National Bank of the Commonwealth. Philadelphia — Drexel & 
Co. Chicago— Continental National Bank. St. Louis— The Mechanics' 
Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. London— Brown Shipley & 
Co. Paris— Morgan, Harjes & Co. 

Mutual Savings Bank oi San Francisco. 

88 Post Street, below Kearny. Mechanics' Institute Building 

Guaranteed Capital 11,000,000 Pald-Up Capital 1300,000 

JAMES D. PHELAN. President. S. G. MURPHY, Vloe-Presldent. 
GEO. A. STORY. Cashier. JOHN A. HOOPER, Vice-President. 

C. B. HOBSON, Assistant Cashier. 

Directors— James D. Phelan, L. P. Drexler, John A. Hooper, c. G. 
Hooker, James Moffltt, S. G. Murphy, Frank J. Sullivan, Robert McElroy, 
and Joseph D. Grant. 

Interest paid on Deposits. Loans on approved securities. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order, Wells, Fargo & Co, , or Exchange 
on City Banks. Whenopenlng accountssend slgnatuie. 

SWiSS American Bank or LOCARNO, Switzerland, and 

Germania Trust Go. of San Francisco 8 '? re " , n s B0 F mcrs 

Paid-up Capital and Reserves, $620,000. 
I ; T Co. *3-i0,000) (S. a 
A general savings and commercial banking business transacted. Inter- 
est paid on savings deposits. Loans on approved real estate security and 
on commercial paper. 

DIRECTORS— Ernst A. Denlcke, A. Sbarboro. J. C. Rued, E. Martlnonl 
F. C. Slebe, A. Tognazzlni, H Brunner, McD R. Venable, A. G. Wieland' 
F. Kronenberg, Charles Martin, C Jehret, P. Tognazzinl, S. Grand!. 

GroGker-Woolworth National Bank ot S. F. 

Corner Market, Montgomery, 
and Post Streets. 

Pald-Up Capital 11,000,000 

WM.H CROCKER President 

W+S-JPGFJS.^ Vice-President 

GEO. W.KLINE Cashier 

Directors— Henry T Scott, E. B. Pond, Hy. J.Crooker, Geo. W. Soott 



STRATAGEM. 




FRANCES FORBES, ( married 
sister;) Nettie Astley, (younger 
and unmarried sister.) 

Frances — I think you are behaving 
very badly to Captain Kerr; you keep 
him hanging about, yet you won't give 
him the opportunity he is waiting for 
to propose to you. 

Nettie — That's just it; how can I, , 
when I haven't made up my mind what 
answer to give him? 

F. — Surely you know your own mind 
by now; you ought to. 

N. — But I don't. I like him immen- 
sely, and can't do without him; he looks 
so well. I don't know any man whose 
coats sit better than his, and he wears 
such fascinating ties, and all the 
women envy me when they see him by 
my side. 

F.— Which is pretty often. But 
surely you like him for something more 
than the cut of his coat and the color 
of his lies? 

N. — Yes, I do; but I dare not let him propose yet, for 
fear I should say "Yes," and regret it all my life; or, per- 
haps, say "No," and then think what a fool I have been. 
So the only thing is to keep him near me, but never with- 
out a third person being present, or the crisis will come 
and I shall do the thing I ought not to have done. 

F. — Well, all I can say is that I've no patience with you, 
and it isn't fair to Captain Kerr, he is such a nice fellow, 
and I really think deserves a better fate. 

N. — Than me? Well, perhaps he does. (Takes up her 
gloves.) Do you want anything at the Stores? 

F. — What are you going there for? 

N. — To meet Kate Erskine, she wants me to help her to 
choose a cape. 

F. — Then you won't be at home for tea? 

N. — No; we shall have it at the Stores, or somewhere 
else. If Captain Kerr calls, eDtertainhim kindly and give 
him my love. 

(At the Army and Navy Stores.) 

Mrs. Erskine — So, here you are. Oh, by the bye, 
Nettie, I hope you won't be cross, but Charlie Vavasour is 
coming to meet us here. He wants to see me about some- 
thing. 

Nettie — That is nothing new, is it Kate? So I suppose 
I am to make myself scarce, three is such an impossible 
number. 

Mrs. E.— Perhaps he'll bring another man with bim. 

N. — If he does, it is sure to be some one I dislike. What 
a nuisance! 

Mrs. E. — Here they come, oh it's 

N. (coloring slightly)— Captain Kerr. 

Mrs. E. — Looking smarter than ever. I want to know 
more of that man; you can talk to Charlie if you like. 

N. — Thanks, but supposing I don't like? 

Mrs. E. — Ob, nonsense! variety is good for the soul, and 
you are always with Captain Kerr (turns towards the two 
men approaching.) Ah, how do you do? Have you come 
to help me decide upon a mantlt? I'm sure you have ex- 
cellent taste, Captain Kerr, so come and give me the bene- 
fit of it. (Nettie and Mr. Vavasour follow behind.) 

N. — How insufferably hot this place is! I can't think 
why Kate comes here for her clothes. I suppose we shall 
have to wait ever so long before she gets attended to. 

Vavasour — I didn't know she knew Kerr; he said 
nothing about her to me. 

N. — They seem to know each other remarkably well. 
(Tbey enter the mantle department.) 

V. — A man feels such a fool in these feminine places; at 
least I do. I wish I hadn't come. 

N. — How rude you are; pray go. 

V. — Do forgive me, Miss Astley, it was an awfully gauche 
thing to say, but of course I am charmed to be with you 
anywhere. Kerr seems to be enjoying it; I should think 
he'll try a mantle on his own shoulders directly. 

N. — He appears to admire Mrs. Erskine's. 



_ _.» 



July 16, 1898. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS I.KTTI-R. 



'5 



-I am not surprised, she has remar.ii. pretty 



V 
ones. 

N. (spitefully) — She kuowsit, too, and isfonii howio>' 
them. 
V— She looks very well in evening dress. 

00k ing bored)— Did we come here to disci; - Mrs. 
Erski&e's charms? 

Mrs. K. — Nettie, what do you think of this? (Holds up 
a mass of glittering jet and lace.) 

N . — I don't care for it much, but I'm not a good judge 
of capes, ask Captain Kerr. 

Kerb — Isn't it just a little too matronly for you? Try 
something a little younger-looking; that little thing of 
chiffon and feathers is pretty. 

Mrs. E.— The very thing. Captain Kerr you are inval 
uable. 

K. (to Nettie) — Aren't you going to have one, Miss 
Astley? 

N. (shortly) — No; I don't wear capes. (Glances in the 
glass at the reflection of the trim tailor-built coat she is 
wearing; in doing so, catches an admiring look in Kerr's 
eyes. The cape is chosen, and they make their way to 
the tea-room, which is crowded.) 
N. — Hot, untempting, and impossible! 
K. — Let's go somewhere else. 

Mrs. E. — But where? I'm dying for tea; choosing gar- 
ments is so exhausting. 

V. — There a new place in Bond Street that's rather 
decent. 

K. — Then let's go there by all means. 

(On the steps outside the Stores.) 
K. (to commissionaire) — Two hansoms. 
Mrs. E. — Jump in, Nettie. 

N. (huffly) — Are the men going together? (Mrs. E. 
does not answer, but steps quickly into the second hansom, 
followed immediately by Vavasour. Kerr takes the va- 
cant place beside Nettie.) 

K. (as they drive off)— At last I 
N— At last what? 
K. — That I have what I've wanted 
for weeks — you alone. How you have 
avoided me! 

N. — Quite the contrary, I think. 
People say that you are always with 
, me. 

K. — But never alone. Did you think 
I should be satisfied to go on for ever 
like that? 

N. — Men are never satisfied, are 
they? 

K.— Sometimes. I am very nearly 
so now. 

N. — I think you might give me a 
little more room, this seems to be an 
unusually narrow hansom. Why didn't 
you go with Mrs. Erskine? 

K. — Because she didn't want me, 
and asked Vavasour. 

N. — Indeed! how disappointed you 
must have been. 
K.— Dreadfully, don't I look it? 
(Nettie gazes straight before her.) 
K. — You are not looking. 

N.— I can see you in the glass. (Their eyes meet in the 
mirror.) 

K.— That's the second time to-day. Do you know I 
didn't know your eyes were so blue. 

N. — It's the reflection from my hat. Captain Kerr, 
where are we driving? This isn't the way to Bond Street. 
K.— No, it's not. I told the man to drive round the 
Park. We can get tea at Kensington. 
N. — But what will the others say? 
K.— I don't think they'll mind, do you? 
(Frances Porbes's boudoir. 6:30 same afternoon. Enter 
Mrs. Erskine.) 

Mrs. E.— Well, I've managed it beautifully. I kept 
Captain Kerr hanging about me till 1 saw Nettie was 
; furious with jealousy, and then I passed him on to her. 
They are at the present moment together in a hansom or 
somewhere else, at any rate without a third person, and 
with opportunities. 
P. (doubtfully)— I hope she'll accept him. 




Mr*. B, No four. But hark I here she comes; not a 
word. mind. (Enter Nettie, with heightened color and 
brilliant eyes.) 

Mrs. K Why, Nettie, wherever have you been? 
Cbarlir and I waited as long as we could for you, and then 
1 came on here to Bee if anything had happened. 

N. (laughing) — Well, something hat happened. 

Both— What ' 

N. — I'm engaged to Captain Kerr. 

F— Oh! how did it happen? 

N. — He took a mean advantage of me, and declared he 
would not let the hansom stop tiil I gave him an answer. 
We drove round and round that Park till the poor horse 
was positively dizzy, so out of pity for the anima! and his 
master I was at last induced to make up my mind. 

Both — And you accepted him? 

N. — What else could I do? Fancy the awkwardness of 
being in a cab with a man who has proposed and been 
rejected. 

Mrs. E. — Certainly not so pleasant as being in the same 
situation with the man you have accepted. My dear 
Nettie, your hat is all awry. 

N. (coloring) — Oh, but that's the fashion, you know. — 
Florence Hope, in St. Paul's. 

BANKING. 
The ftnglo-Galifornian Bank, Limited. 

Capital authorized 10,000,000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 

Paid Up 1,500,000 

Reserve Fund 700,000 

N. E. Cob. Pine and Sansome Sts 
Head Office— 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 

Agents at New York— J. & W. Sellgman & Co., 21 Broad street. 
The Bank transacts a General Banking Business, sells drafts, makes 
telegraphic transfers, and Issues letters of credit available throughout the 
world. Sends bllba for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange 
and bullion. IGN. STEfNHART l M . n . MrR 
P. N. LILIENTBAL f Managers 

The German Savings and Loan Societu. 

No. 526 California Street, San Francisco 

Guarantee capital and surplus 13,109,000 09 

Capital actually paid up in cash.. 1,000.000 00 

Deposits December 31, 189V 26,309,633 36 

OFFICERS: President, B. A. Becker; First Vice-President, Daniel 
Meyer; Second Vice-President, H. Horstman; Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; 
Assistant Cashier, William Herrmann ; Secretary, George Tourny ; Assist- 
ant Secretary, A. H. Muller; Attorney, W. S. Goodfellow. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS: B. A. Becker, Daniel Meyer, H. Horst- 
mann, Ign. Steinhart, N. Van Bergen, E. Rohte, H. B. Russ, D. N. 
Walter and N. Ohlandt. 

Wells Fargo & Go. Bank. 

N. E. Corner Sansome & Sutter Streets 

John J. Valentine President 

Homer S. King Manager 

H. Wadsworth Cashier 

F. L. Llpman Assistant Cashier 

Cash Capital and Surplus 16,260,000 

BRANCHES. 

N. Y.City, H. B. Parsons, Cashier. | Salt Lake City, J. E.Dooly, Cashier 

Portland, Or., R. M. Dooly, Cashier. 

Directors— John J. Valentine, Benj. P. Cheney, Oliver Eldridge, Henry 

E. Huntington, Homer S. King, George E. Gray, John J. MoCook, John 

Bermlngham, Dudley Evans. 

London, Paris and American Bank, Limited. 

N.W. Cob. Sansome & Sutter Sts. 

Subscribed Capital 12,500,000 

Paid Up Capital 18,000,000 

Reserve Fund I 850,000 

Head Office , 40 Threadneedle Street, London, E. C. 

AGENTS— New York— Agenoy of the London, Paris, and Amerloan 
Bank Limited, No. 10 Wall Street, N. Y. Paris— Messrs. Lazard, Frerel 
& Cie, 17 Boulevard Polssonlere. Draw direot on the prlnoipal cities of the 
world. Commercial and Travelers 1 Credits Issued. 

SIQ. GREENEBAtTMl M . naMra 
C. ALTSCHUL / Managers. 

Security Savings Bank. 

222 Montgomery St.. Mills Building. 

INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. 

LOANS MADE. 

DIRECTORS. 
William Alvord S. L. Abbot Jr. H.H.Hewlett 

Wm. Baboook O. D. Baldwin E. J. McCutohen 

Adam Grant W. S. Jones R. H. Pease 

Continental Building & Loan Association of California. 

Established in 1E89. 222 Sansome St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Subscribed Capital, $7,000,000 Profit and Reserve Fund, 8100,000 

Paid-in Capital - - - 1,000,000 Monthly lnoome, over • - 76,000 

Dr. Ed. E Hill, President. Capt. Oliver Eldridge, Vice President. 
Wm. Corbin, Secretary and General Manager. 



i6 



SAN FRANCISCO NKWS LETTER. 



July i6, 1898. 




Without a Rival 

FOB iiii.iiiim and HEB70U8 DIBOBDBKI 

Weak Stomach 
Impaired Digestion 

Disordered Liver 
Sick Headache, etc. 

IN MEN, WOMIN OR CHILDREN, 
dlroctnd.wlll 
oomhlotii 

liimltn, 11 ■■ i" 1 ill 1 1111 1 

1, ■in. 

Beecham's Pills 

Annual 8ni«» ovor 0,000,000 m. •»•••.. 

. ■ ■ ■ ■ 



THE WELLESLEY, 

u lir California Street. 

1 he Most Aiti ii livi I imily Hotel in San Francisco. 
ly New in bvciy ronture. 

The Bella Vista is the Pioneei 
First-class Family Hotel ol 
San Francisco. All the com- 
forts ol a modern residence. 

MHS A K. TKAOY 

m.iiIImiii Square, Hnwilw.iu and 23(1 
Street. 

HOTEL, 
BARTHOLD! 

New York 



Hotel Bella Vista 



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A I irst , Li-.-. Hotel 



New York. 



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Rreit S Roblee, Proof.. 
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Occidental Hotel. 



A qulol homo, centrally located, for 
thoio who appreciate comfort and 
mention. 



Wm. B. Moopcr, Manaocr. 



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WASHINGTON, D. C 



THE HOTEL PAR EXCELLENCE " 
Ol the Nun.Mutl t'Mpiiitl. rirat clam* In all 

. 1 guide to Waab.nfton will be 

I'lmrniv upon receipt of two 



O. 0. STAPLES, Prop. 



DR. d. NICHOLS, 



iy Physician of Amador Count vl 

. ii.'. Powell and Rllla, Reeldonco, 
ctiolae Hotel, Market St. Hours: 1 to 4 p m ; to 8 p m 
Balablli 



Joseph oniott's Steel Pens, 



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Mh. Mkniit IIiii.ii Johnelrool, Now York 
Sold by all Stationery . 




Northward Om the "Great lee." A Narrative of Life anil Work 
along the Shores and upon <i"' Interior Ice-t'i.p "i Niirilinn 
Qrranland In Iba ytai L887,bj Robert B. Peary, Civil 

Bnginiar, D.8, N. svolumeei Prederlok a. Htoket* Co. For 
sale by Dozer, I 

In tlio Introduction to his book, Northward Over the 
"Great Ioe," R, B, Peary, 0. B, U. B. N., says: "One 
evening (iii 1886) in one of my favorite haunts, an old book- 
store in Washington. I came tpou a fugitive paper on the 
Inland Ioe of Greenland, A. ohord whloh, as a boy, had 
vibrated Intensely i e at the reading of Kane's wonder- 
ful book, was touched again. 1 read all 1 could upon tin' 
subject, noted the cnntlicting experiences of Nordensk jold 
Jensen and the rest, and felt that I must see for myself 
what the truth was of this great mysterious interior. My 
summer voyage to Greenland In l88o and reconnoissance of 
the Inland lee was the outcome." Thus far Lieutenant 
Peary's arotlc voyages have been six In number, dating 
from 1886 to 1898 Besides summer voyages, he mod' 
siav of eighteen months In North Greenland, taking a 
twelve hundred mile sledge journey across the lee-Cap. 

and later on a second twelve hundred mile sledge trip anil 
a Sojourn Of over two years in the "white North." These 
sledge-journeys were made in widest contradistinction to the 
i OM of the usual sledge-party, which had always been along 
the frozen surface of the polar sea and never above the sea 
level. Peary's journeys, on the contrary, have been made 
over an elevated, unbroken piuteuuof snow, lifted from.".. nun 
to 10,00X1 (eel above the level of the sea 
where the intrepid traveler across its 
fri i. en wastes sees, to use Peary's own 
words, "but the infinite expanse of 
the frozen plain, the Infinite dome of 

the cold blue siy, and the o .Id white 
sun — nothing but these.' The book 
abounds in maps, diagrams, ami many 
hundred illustrations, and cannot fail 
to bo of great value geographically and 
scientifically, whilst it, dues much to 

enlighten the general reader as to the 

ethnology, meteorology, natural bistorj 
and conditions of the Arctic regions. The 

discovery of the great hundred-ton Cape 
Yuri, meteorite, and .is two compan- 
ions, which after many difficulties and 
tiring effort were finally transported 
most interesting, Not less so are the anecdotes of the 
natives, sketches of their charai-tcristics, and the glowing 
tributes to his faithful dogs, without which animals these 
marvelous journeys across the great ice fields would have 
been impossible. MOSt eloquent does the author grow at 
limes Over this frozen Sahara of the North itssforms and 
glaciers, its drifting snows and savage blizzards, and the de- 
scriptions of his long sledge journeys over unknown snow 
wastes, are as thrilling as anything In Arctic history. 

Mr. Peary is a ploturesque and often poetic writer, and it 
is with a particularly loving touch that he sketches an out- 
line picture of the hardy Utile people whose habitation a the 

west coast of Greenland. Peary has taken a deeply human 
interest in "the little community of Eskimos, the most north- 
erly known individuals of the human race, numbering about 
two hundred and fifty, living at and north of Cape York, 
completely isolated from the rest of mankind bv impassable 
icy barriers'' The effect of Mr. Peary's expedition! Upon 
these children Of the North has been to ameliorate their 
condition to a wonderful degree, and with their welfare he 
is deeply concerned. He concludes a most interesting chap- 
ter upon this the most interesting of all aboriginal tribes 
with the following paragraph: "Fortunately for them, 
with no possessions to excite cupidity, with aland ill which 
no one but themselves could conquer a living, they are 
likely to he left in peace— to live out the part appointed 
them by the Creator, undisturbed by efforts to understand 
the while man's idea of God. of right, of morality, and 
unoontaminated by his vices and diseases, till the 'Great 




three years of un- 
to New York, is 



July 16. 1898. 



FRANCISCO NBWS LETTER. 



'7 



Night' ends forever, and the 'Great Ice' n the 

-ions of the last day." 

The explorer has set forth his experiences in 
larly modest way. giving to bis readers a sin 
ment of facts, but do one can read the record of 1 eaten- 
ant Peary's hardships, his sacrifices, his tireless rmtl- 
gations and daring enterprises, without rendering to this 
brave and great Arctic traveler all the honor due 1/ \ 
telegram from Halifax, X. S.. bearing date of .In 
says "Lieutenant Peary has arrived at Sydney. <'. K 
his way to the Arctic regions. He says he is confident 
that he will reach the North Pole this time, but he may 
consume four years in doing it." There is every reason to 
believe that this anticipation may be realized. The suc- 
cess of the present expedition would be a powerful stimu- 
lus to the renaissance of Arctic interest so manifest in 
these latter years of our Nineteenth Century. 

Much praise is due the publishers for the care given to 
the many illustrations as well as to the general appearance 
of the book, which, in its cool garb of blue and white, sug- 
gests crevices and ice slopes, glaciers and fjords — "the 
cold blue sky, the cold white sun." 

Shrew-bury. A Romance, with 24 illustrations. Longmans. Green 
■v. Co. . New York. For 9ale by Doxey. $1.50. 

Stanley Weyman is above all things a romanticist, and 
delights in media'valistic atmosphere and historical char- 
acterizations. Shrewsbury is a story true to the times of 
which Mr. Weyman has made so careful a study. The 
reader is here treated to scenes and events in the reign of 
William and Mary, and gains from the book a good idea of 
the customs and manners of that period. But whilst 
full of local color, deep-laid plots, attempted escapes and 
treasonable schemes, it fails to thrill one as did the "Gen- 
tleman of France " or " Under the Red Robe." The story 
is told in autobiographical form, the narrator being one 
Richard Price, who enters the service of the Earl, 
afterwards Duke of Shrewsbury, as secretary. Owing 1o 
a curious resemblance to his patron, he is used by Shrews- 
bury's enemies to personate him, causing the king to doubt 
the loyalty of his faithful subject and Whig minister. 
Shrewsbury is made to appear as aiding and abetting 
Barclay in his plot to assassinate the king, and also as 
assisting in the attempted escape of Sir John Fenwick. 
Finally, Price saves his "most noble and generous patron." 
The secretary is a very unheroic creature, and writes him- 
self down as the incarnation of cowardice, so much so that 
at times one feels that Richard Price well deserved the 
abject misery which, as the tool of Robert Ferguson, the 
Jacobite sympathizer, he endured. However, the reader 
will in 110 way begrudge him the peaceful denouement of 
all his trials. 

Cursed by a Fortune, by George Manville Fenn. Rand, MeNally & 
Co., Chicago and New York. 
As a clever 'newspaper man Mr. Fenn made for himself 
quite a name in London; then he joined, the ranks of the 
great army of fiction writers. "Cursed by a Fortune " is 
neither better nor worse than thousands of other novels 
that find their way into print each year, and for books of 
its ilk there will ever be a goodly number of readers. To 
the hoi polloi there is for fictional perfection a never fail- 
ing recipe, wh : ch runs something as follows : A heroine, 
young, beautiful, trusting; a hero, manly, handsome, brave; 
a villain, scheming, sordid, sinful, with a contemplated 
murder or two on the tapis; a sprinkling of guardians, and 
aunts, and uncles, and faithful old family servants, the 
whole; their doings and sayings, to run on through some 
three hundred pages or more of print. None of these in- 
gredients has Mr. Fenn omitted in "Cursed by a Fortune." 
How Kate Wilmot, at the death of her father, a Director 
of the Great British and Bengalle Stock Bank, is be- 
queathed some £150,000; how Pierce Leigh, M. D., an im- 
pecunious young surgeon, loves her, but will not tell her 
so because she is a rich heiress and he a poor doctor; how 
John Garstang, a so-called friend of her father's, and a 
rogue, under pretense of rescuing Kate from the obses- 
sions of her young cub of a cousin, induces her to leave her 
uncle's house and seek refuge under his (Garstang's) roof, 
where he makes her life miserable and almost succeeds in 
killing her; how, finally, just at the right moment, a com- 
mercial crisis bursts upon London, leaving Kate penniless 



and Leigh free to press his suit; how out of evil oame 
much good, and how, like in the fairy tale of olden time, 
the hero and heroine "lived happily together ever after- 
wards,'' it would be unfair to the novelist to set forth here. 

The writer of the London letter to The Dial says that 
first editions of the late Lewis Carroll's books are bring- 
ing high prices in the auction rooms. A copy of "The 
(Jarland of Rachel" sold for 162.50, Rut its value was en- 
hanced bv the fact that it was one of the earliest produc- 
tions of the private printing-press of the Rev. H. Daniel, 
Fellow of Worcester College, Oxford, and that only thirty- 
two copies of it were printed. In 1881, when the volume 
was printed, it sold for {20. 

The late Mr. James Payn, the English novelist, was the 
occasion of one of the neatest and aptest punning quota- 
tions ever made. He was much averse to violent physical 
exercise of any kind. On one occasion, however, two in- 
timate friends persuaded him to try some mountain climb- 
ing. A very little of the unwonted exertion satisfied Payn. 
He sat down exhausted, while his friends went forward, 
one of them remarking to the other, "The labor ve delight 
in physics Payn." 

THERE will be a sale of thirty head of well-bred road 
and carriage horses, next Tuesday at eleven o'clock, 
at Killip & Co.'s salesyard, corner Market and Van Ness 
avenue. As they are all by standard sires and out of well- 
bred and standard mares, this should be a good opportun- 
ity of securing a fine animal. The sale is positive and 
without reserve. 

Ins st Upon Having Your Ticket to New York, Boston, or 

Other Eastern Cities 
Read over the Nickel Plate (N. Y. C. & St. L. R. R.). the popular 
low-rate short line. Quick time, unexcelled accommodations, and 
no extra fares charged. Jay W. Adams, Pacific Coast Passenger 
Agent, 37 Crocker Building, San Francisco, Cal. 

Mothers, be sure and use " Mrs. Witrslow's Soothing Syrup " for your 
ohildren while teething. 

Jackson's Napa Soda is the finest table water in the world. 



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i8 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 16. 1898. 




TME L?<>KER °N 



AT a juvenile party given last Monday evening at a 
Jackson-street mansion, there was both comedy and 
tragedy, depending on your point of view. The master of 
the house, to conceal his premature baldness, wears an 
artistically constructed wig without which he is never 
seen by any eyes save those of his wife and his hairdresser. 

He was awfully bored by his young guests, especially by 
the fifteen boys who composed half of the company. He is 
himself the proud father of four little girls, but he abhors 
boys, rattlesnakes and dogs. Just before the mid-evening 
supper and after dancing a rather romping set of Sir 
Roger de Coverly, Monsieur retired to his own apart- 
ment to adjust his attire. 

At a critical moment his quiet was invaded, his vanity 
wounded and his temper ruffled by the unwelcome appear- 
ance of a little shaver, whose meddlesome paws began to 
disturb the habitual neatness of the apartment. In his 
wrath, my lord roared loudly for someone to remove the 
kid. and in response a lady and two or three nurses rushed 
up in great anxiety. 

As the little imp was borne away in a sea of ribbons and 
cap strings, he shrieked: 

"That funny old man has left his hair upon the looking 

glass." 

* * * 

Still clinging tenaciously to the peculiar sort of fame be 
acquired during the supremacy of sand lot statesmanship, 
the principal interest of the wily Dennis Kearney are now 
centered in Pine street. He is a persistent bear and by 
no means an unsuccessful operator. 

During the most recent collapse in wheat values, the 
cunning anti-Mongolian acquired another tidy little fortune. 
He began to sell when the cereal was in the neighborhood 
of 1.87 and continued to short until it had been steadily 
forced downward for some sixty points. His success gives 
Dennis a standing in the Produce Exchange, where he was 
at one epoch in his career very decidedly pertona non grata, 
and he is frequently shown consideration iu unexpected 
quarters. 

Sauntering into the Call Boardroom, the other day, just 
before the opening of the afternoon session, Kearney was 
soon joined by two prominent brokers, anxious for his 
business. Each of the Produce Exchange men was smok- 
ing, but the mouth of Dennis was devoid of tobacco. 
Simultaneously two cigars were extended toward the bear 
operator in as many invitations to join the pair in a little 
nicotine. 

As neither cigar possessed apparent superiority in size 
or quality, the thrifty Dennis accepted both. 
* * * 

At the big midsummer wedding, one of the ushers, who 
is a good deal of a cynic, was rather unfortunate in the 
phrasing of his felicitations to his friend, the groom. 

" Now, old boy," facetiously remarked the usher, who 
would rather have been bending over his ledger in the 
bank than officiating at a wedding. "I hope that you 
will not find marriage a failure." 

" I hope not, indeed," was the ready rejoinder, "for the 
chief reason I brought the courtship to such a sudden close 
was that the engagement would soon have made a bank- 
rupt of me!" 

A tall, thin man, Horace Piatt by name, who in the 
merry chase for the brush in the San Rafael hunts, usually 
rides a tall, thin horse, and whose humor, even at his own 
expense, gushes forth spontaneously like champagne from 
an uncapped bottle, heard a very unkind remark upon his 
equestrian appearance the other day. 

Just as Horace was putting his best foot forward, ore 
urchin called to another: 

"Come and see the scissors astride of the gate ! " 



Despite local conditions, a fair young flower of an 
authoress flourishes at Hanford. Knowing that Irving 
M. Scott is a generous patron of literature and art, this 
genius of the female persuasion wrote to him for advice as 
to publication, cherishing the secret hope that the ship- 
builder might throw himself in the breach. 

"I have wrote a novel," she naively confessed in her 
communication. "What would you advise?" she con- 
cluded, ingenuously. 

Mr. Scott was preparing to go abroad, but this was too 
bright a gem to remain unanswered. 

"If you will carefully examine your manuscript," 
guardedly wrote the manager of the Union Iron Works. 
"You will r'nd that it possesses many inherent qualities 
of great value for setting hens." 

The literary daughter of the plains has read this sugges- 
tion so often that she knows it by heart. Its meaning is 

still unsolved. 

* * » 

H. H. Taylor is a corpulent agriculturist who, although 
his bucolic interests are conducted from the Mills Building, 
demonstrated his devotion to the. soil by organizing that 
benevolent institution, the San Francisco Farmers' Club. 

As Taylor sauntered into his favorite corner in a Pine- 
street restaurant at noon, the other day, his friend, Jack 
Bourdet, sympathized with the honest granger who, in 
consequence of the season's drought, will practically have 
no crop this year. 

"Yes," was the sad response of Yeoman Taylor, his 
frame quivering with a massive sigh. "Yes. It is hard 
lines. But thank God," he added, piously, "my neighbors 
will be as badly off as I am." 

* * » 

The Wednesday matinee audience at the Orpheum is 
always a highly orderly one, — not a fashionable audience, 
you understand, but a decently-behaved, respectable- 
looking one. It is ladies' day and babies' day and a day 
when the stock company people from the different theatres 
have a chance to sit on this side of the footlights, and 
there are no better conducted, more attentive, and more 
sympathetic auditors than theatrical people. They are 
always ready to applaud cleverness and endeavor, and 
have the courtesy to sit quiet while they are being enter- 
tained. 

But last week this decent, attentive Wednesday crowd 
was rudely disturbed by the entrance of eight young women 
who went stamping down the side aisle, headed by a well- 
known demi-mondaine. They took up the most prominent 
box seats they could find, and kept up an incessant jab- 
ber and clutter, to the visible annoyance of all their neigh- 
bors, and, when any one uttered a polite "Sh" they 
turned round and burst out laughing and went on jabber- 
ing and cluttering louder than ever. Contract wives and 
their friends should really have more modesty than to be- 
have themselves as if they were real society. 

* « * 

It will be noted that the woes of the disreputable gang 
that attempted to grow rich by blackmailing Capt. W. A. 
Nevills are not yet ended. At Fresno, last Tuesday, 
Azhderain, the male member of the trio of conspirators, 
was arrested for the larceny of a number of articles that 
belonged to the mine owner. They were found in the house 
occupied by Azhderain upon a search warrant. This only 
bears out the general reputation of this unspeakable 
creature, whose whole career and connection with Capt. 
Nevills have been those of a base ingrate, whose chief char- 
acteristics commend him to solitary restraint. Doubtless 
he will find, before the case against himself and his confed- 
erates is finally disposed of, that it does not pay to attempt 
blackmail, conspiracy and larceny in California. 

* » • 

At a Fourth of July Committee meeting last week, plain- 
ness of speech was much in evidence. Blarney was con- 
spicuous by its absence, although a strong, if not always 
successful effort was made to be polite. Of this, a fine 
example was given in the remark of a much respected 
citizen in whose Maryland veins some drops of Milesian 
blood are certainly flowing, for the worthy patriot ob- 
served, with great emphasis and earnestness, that he had 
been "most painfully impressed by a letter which he had 
had the pleasure of reading." 



July 16, 1898. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



'9 



At the Co:umbia is a curtain raiser called ,' 
Girl, and the Littlest Girl is played by a ni< ••>[ that 
clever little actress. Kate Best. " Gracie Best 
she has already decided opinions as to her sta^'i value. 
After the first night she asked a friend who had oen to 
see the play this rather embarrassing question: Now, 
who do you like best '.' Me or Madeleine Bouton ? " 
Gracie," was the answer, "you have both good p. 
"Yes. I know." answered the child, "I know ur t 
have good parts." 

* # # 

S. Gump has just returned from an extended trip 
abroad. He sailed from New York last March for 
Europe, and visited all the principal art centers of the Old 
World. He stopped four hours at Gibraltar, and drove 
about that impregnable fortress; passed through the 
Mediterranean and had a fine view of the Azores, where 
the picturesque villages and cities laid out in the moun- 
tains presented a most interesting view. At Naples he 
stopped for a time and visited Pompeii; thence to Nice, to 
Florence and to Venice. From Venice he passed over the 
Austrian Alps to Vienna, to Munich, Dresden and Berlin. 
From the ( German capital he visited bis old home at Heidel- 
berg. Later he went to TVeisbaden, Frankfort, Brussels, 
Antwerp and Paris, where he spent some weeks, and 
visited Cherbourg, where the greatest fortifications in 
Europe are to be seen. Mr. Gump sailed for New York 
on the Feurst Bismarck. From Gotham he went to 
Washington, and was at the Capital when a private tele- 
gram was received by his friend, Senator Cullum, bringing 
the first intelligence of our loss of 1500 men in Cuba. It is 
hardly Decessary to add that it would have been impossible 
for Mr. Gump to have made the journey he did, visiting 
every important art center of the Old World, without 
securing many treasures from the greatest painters of 
Europe. He was accompanied on his trip by his son, 
Alfred S. Gump. 

ART AND LIQUOR. 

THE artistic appeals to the intelligent always; and art 
is thoroughly democratic — it knows no country, 
clime nor condition. It is found everywhere in things little 
and large. It may excite the admiration of the con- 
noisseur on canvas or in marble; and it appeals to the un- 
tutored in the grandeur of nature. It is purely esthetic, 
and it may be intensely practical. A happy illustration 
of the blending of both these may be found on the cover of 
to-day's News Letter. The artist tells an interesting 
story without words. The opened bottle, the lighted 
cigar, the half-filled glass, tell of conviviality without 
boisterousness — of the gentleman's genteel glass of the 
finest liquor sold anywhere or to be had for money or 
favor. In everything that is bought we always think first 
of the purity of the article; and J. F. Cutter whiskey is 
as pure as patient experiment and years of manufacture 
can make it. There has from the first been but one 
standard for this fine liquor, and that is the highest; made 
of the best and most carefully selected material, the abso- 
lute purity of this whiskey is recognized the world over, 
and its popularity is increasing — the result of its un- 
doubted merits. The sole agents for the United States 
for this unequaled liquor is the well-known and long-estab- 
lished firm of E. Marfan & Co., at 411 Market street, San 
Francisco. 

THE handsome half-tone full-page plate with this 
week's News Letter is taken from a couple of the 
beautiful views that are to be seen in the Gum Tree tract 
beyond the Mission. That picturesque part of our city is 
but little appreciated at present, but in a short time its 
adaptability for park and zoological purposes will be held 
at their true value. Many improvements are being made 
there now, and in the future that will be one of the most 
interesting portions of the city. 

Moore's Poison Oak Remedy. 
Cures poison oak and all skin diseases. Sold by all druggists. 

Wedding and Birthday Presents. Magnificent assortment to 
select from at the art store of S. & G. Gump, 113 Geary street. 



Jackson's Napa Soda Lemonade is a luxury— try it. 



" REMEMBER MANILA " 




But do not 
forget that— 



4>.A '■' 



KEYSTONE 
MONOGRAM 

Is America's greatest 
triumph in the way 
of a pure RYE WHISKEY. 




racitic Coast Agents: 

SHERWOOD & SHERWOOD, 

Portland. San Francisco. Los Angeles. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Loma Prieta Prune Ranch Company, 

Location of principal place ot business— San Franoisco, Cal. Location 
of ranch— Monte-ey County, Cal. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the Thirteenth (13th) day of July, 1898, an assessment, No. it, of Ten 
Dollars ($10) per share was levied upon the capital stock of the 
corporation, payable immediately in United States gold coin to the Sec- 
retary, at the office of the company, 33 Host street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 

MONDAY, the 16th DAY OF AUGUST, 18y& 
will be delinquent, and advertised for sale at public auction, ana unless 
payment is made before will be sold on Thursday, the 15th day of Sep- 
tember, 1898, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of 
advertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

GEORGE A, STORY, Secretary. 
Office: 33 Post street, San Francisco, Cal. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 
Virginia & Gold Hill Water Company. 
The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Virginia and Gold 
Hill Water Company will be held at the office of the company, room 81, 
Nevada Block, 3U9 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal., on 

THURSDAY, the 28th DAY OF JULY. 1898, . 
at the hourof 11 o'clock a, m., for the purpose of electing a Board of Direc- 
tors to serve for the ensuing year and the transaction or such other, busi- 
ness as may come before the meeting. 

D C. BATES. Seoretary. 
Office: Room 81, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Franoisco, 
California. 



Moet & 
Cfrcuidon. 



White Seal (Grand Cuvee) is unsur- 
passed in quality, dryness and flavor. 



—N. Y. Times. 



AUCTION SALE M M 



30 



TUESDAY, JULY 19, 1898, at II a. m. 

By order of Thomas Brown, Esq., at Salesyard, 
CORNER MARKET STREET AND VAN NESS AVENUE, S. F., 

HEAP OF WELL BRED ROAD 

AND CARRIAGE HORSES . . . 



sired by Dexter Prince. James Madison. Cupid, Nephwood, and 
other siandard sires, and out ot Standard and other well-bred 
m*res. Catalogue now ready. Horses at yard July 15th. 
fiffi^Sale positive and without reserve. 
KILL'P &. CO., Live Stock Auctioneers, 11 Montgomery St, S. F., Cal. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




^HERE are two out-of- 
town entertainments on 
ihe tajii.1, both of which 
are exciting a good deal of 
i interest. One will be given 
;vt "Highlands," the Requa 
place in Piedmont, for the 
benefit of the Red Cross, in the form of a "dramatic and 
dialect recital," and Miss Hattie Nathan will be the reader 
of the occasion. 

San Mateo is on tiptoe of expectation, and is preparing 
for the great social event that is to take place there on 
Saturday, the 13th of next month. It will be a garden 
fete, and will be held at Monte Robles— the home of the 
late Col. C. F. Crocker. The object of the fete is to raise 
funds for the remodeling of the rectory and Church of St. 
Matthews. The grounds and fine mansion are admirably 
fitted for the entertainment of the many guests who will 
be present. Mrs. M. A. Easton and the ladies who are in- 
terested with her in arranging for the fete are Mrs. \Ym. 
H. Mills, Mrs. H. P. Schwerin, Mrs. H. S. Scott, Mrs. 
Beylard. Mrs. Captain Sebree, Mrs. Chas. E. Green, Mrs. 
Ansel Easton, Mrs. H. T. Scott and Mrs. Kruttschnitt. 
Through the courtesy of General Merriam the Presidio 
Band will furnisn the music. The fete will last from 1 p.m. 
to ."> p.m., and will oe complete in all its details. A most 
attractive feature will be a Japanese tea house, which 
Mrs. Easton had built in Japan and brought to this coun- 
try in pieces. A bevy of handsome society maidens will 
serve tea dressed in appropriate costumes. The Southern 
Pacific Railroad Company will run a special train, so that 
all may have an opportunity of attending. Games in variety, 
tables and booths for the sale of refreshments, flowers, 
needlework and fancy articles, under the care of society s 
well-known matrons and fair maids. Other attractions yet 
in embryo, but upon which the ladies who have the affair in 
hand and its success at heart are industriously working, 
and something quite out of the common may be confidently 
relied upon as the result. Walter Hobart has promised 
to play Jehu, and on his four-horse drag drive the guests 
from the train to the villa; Joe Tobiu and Joe Grant will 
also do coaching business that day. The special train will 
leave Third and Townsend streets at 12-30, and returning 
leaves San Mateo at 5 p.m. The private coaches of Messrs. 
W. H. Hobart, Geo. A. Newhall, Joseph D Grant and 
others will meet the special train and convey visitors to 
the grounds. The tables will be in charge of the following 
ladies: Mrs. J. Kruttschnitt, Mrs. C. A. Spreckels, Prin- 
cess Poniatowski, Mrs. F. S. Douty. Mrs. Sebree, Mrs. 
W. H. Mills, Mrs. A. B. Ford, Mrs." F. S. Moody, Mrs. J. 
D. Grant, Mrs. George R. Shreve, Mrs. R. P. Schwerin, 
Mrs. Fred R. King, Mrs. Paxson Howard, Mrs. R. J. Wil- 
son, Mrs. M. S. Wilson, Mrs. J. B. Crockett, Mrs. J. S. 
Tobin, Mrs. J. H. P. Howard, Mrs. Austin Tubbs, Mrs 
Duncan Hayne, Mrs. Geo. Pope, Mrs. J. R. K. Nuttall, 
Misses Schussler, Misses Carolan, and others. 

The San Francisco Yacht Club House at Sausalito will 
be ablaze with lights and gay with floral and patriotic 
decoration for the postponed dance which is to take place 
there this evening. A tug will leave this side of the bay 
to carry the invited guests, returning to the city after 
the ball is over, and a gala time is anticipated. Next 
Saturday the Bohemian Club will ho'd their midsummer 
jinks in Meeker's Grove, Marin County. S. Gregory I 
who still tarries in San Francisco, was one of the chief 
guests at the dinner recently given by Mr. and Mrs. 
Luman Wadham to celebrate the birthday of their 
daughter Bertha, at which covers were laid for sixteen. 

Another event which is looked for with much i iterest 
is the launching of the torpedo boat. Farragut, and the 
fact that Miss Betty Ashe is to perform the ceremony of 
christening the vessel, is making all her friends anxious 
to witness the act, which she will no doubt do with the 
grace and dignity for which she is so noted. 




The news in detail has been 
received here of the marriage 
in France of Miss Camille Gros, 
daughter of Madame A. Gros, 
formerly of San Francisco, to 
M. Stephane Lausanne de 
Blowitz, son of M. de Blowitz, 
the correspondent of the Lon- 
don Times. The civil marriage 
took place in Paris last Satur- 
day, the witnesses being Mr. 
Alexander Weil, Mr. Arthur 
Power Lord, Mr. de Campon, 
and Mr. Montier, and was followed 
by a breakfast at the apartment of 
Mme. Gros. On Monday those invited to 
the final ceremony left Paris for "Les 
Lampotts," at Petits Dalles, the chateau of 
the groom's father, where in the evening an 
elaborate dinner was served, at which seven iy- 
five guests were seated. The following day at 
noon the religious ceremony took place in the 
chapel adjoining the chateau. The ushers were 
Mr. George Doucal and Mr. Lausanne; Mr. John 
Walter, proprietor of the London Times, appeared 
as best man. The bride, who is as great a beauty 
as her mother was before her, was robed in white 
liberty satin covered with Point D'Angleterre lace, and 
was given away by her brother, Dr. Edmond Gros. She 
was attended by Miss Alix Gros and Miss Lausanne as 
bridesmaids, who wore dainty gowns of white tulle over 
pink, and by Miss Maye Colburn, of San Francisco, as 
maid of honor, who was attired in blue liberty satin cov- 
ered with blue embroidered mowselinedt soie, Mme. Gros 
wore a beautiful gown of gray embroidered crepe de chine. 
The wedding was followed by a reception, when Mr. and 
Mrs. Lausanne left on their honeymoon trip to the Island 
of Jersey. The bridal gifts received by the bride came 
from America as well as Europe, and were costly and 
beautiful. 

There was a pretty home wedding last Sunday after- 
noon at the residence of Mrs. Adolph Ottinger, on Page 
street, when her sister, Miss Helen Reed, was united in 
marriage to Max Brown, by Rabbi Stark, in the presence 
of a large party of relatives and intimate friends. The 
room where the ceremony was performed was prettily 
dressed with foliage and flowers, and the rest of the house 
was gay with bunting in the national colors. The bridal 
costume was of white mull over white silk, and trimmed 
with white lace, orange blossoms holding her tulle veil in 
place; Miss Esther Kosminsky, as bridesmaid, wore white 
organdie over pink silk; the other attendants were the 
bride's little nephew, Millard Ottinger, as ring bearer, 
and her niece, little Ella Ottinger, as flower girl, who 
wore a pretty gown of pale blue satin. An elaborate 
bridal dinner followed the ceremony; and the young couple, 
who have gone East for their honeymoon, will upon their 
return preside on Devisadero street. 

On Tuesday evening the marriage of Miss Lillian Roths- 
child and E. P. Laventhal was quietly celebrated (owing 
to recent family affliction), the Reverend M. S. Levy per- 
forming the ceremony at the home of the bride's mother. 
The bride, who wore a lovely gown of silk mulle trimmed 
with duchesse lace, a tulle veil and orange blossoms, was 
attended by Miss .Hannah Laventhal, who was gowned in 
white organdie over pink silk, and lsadore Laventhal 
officiated as best man. Los Angeles is to be the future 
home of the young couple. 

The principal military events of the week have bfen the 
brigade drill at the Presidio; the arrival of the New York 
regiment, the departure of the transports for Manila, and 
the drill of the Tennessees at the Pavilion on Thursday 
evening. General King reviewed the troops; there were 
patriotic songs sung, and finally darning. 

The many friends of that very popular young lady, Miss 
Laura McKinstry, are in great distress over her deter- 
mination to withdraw from society in favor of the life of a 
nurse at the Children's Hospital, a work she has entered 
into with the energy and thoroughness which has always 
characterized whatever she undertakes. 



July i6. 1S9S. 



SAN FRANCISCO NBWS LBTTBR. 



The wedding of Miss Sadie Blum and 1 .Tick- 

took place on Tuesday evening, the t: 
officiating. To-morrow afternoon the «. Mist 

Hattie Son and Emil Deutsch will take place Ml 
Mrs. K. B. Mastick celebrated the golden in ersaxj 
of their wedding last week at the family res 
Pacific avenue. Alameda, where they have reside' Mnce 
early in the '60 decade. 

The paper chase still flourishes at San Rafael, ' 
this summer fewer ladies join iii the diversion 1 h;i 
season, and the loss of Miss Warburton. who was such a 
devotee the sport, is greatly felt. Last Saturday's 
chase was entirely composed of male riders, but it is said 
that an entertainment given by Mrs. Pelham Ames, who 
is camping in Ross Valley, may account for the absence of 
lady riders on the occasion. George Quarre proving the 
winner of the silver cup as first "in." There will be 
another paper chase to-day. 

Former New Yorkers attested their State loyalty last 
Thursday morning by the royal reception they gave the 
New York volunteers who arrived on that morning. The 
soldiers were taken to Mechanics' Pavilion, 1,500 strong, 
and were treated to a bountiful meal consisting of chicken 
fricassee, roast beef, potatoes, green peas, bread, with 
dessert and coffee. Some idea of the feed may be had by 
the quantity of provisions used— 900 pounds of beef. 280 
chickens, 180 gallons of coffee, 45 gallons of ice cream, and 
other things in proportion. Ladies from New York State 
waited on the tables and did their work well. The caterer, 
Max Abraham, supplied the provisions and superintended 
the dinner. 

Capt. W. A. Nevills has not been in excellent health for 
some time. Last winter he contracted the grip and has 
not vet fully recovered. Last Wednesday evening he suf- 
fered from a severe attact of heart failure, and was so low 
that, despite the efforts of his attendants and physician, 
his life was for several hours despaired of. The attack 
finally yielded to treatment, and the Captain is now very 
much better, his many friends throughout the State will 
be pleased to know. 

Mr. and Mrs. Sayelle of Honolulu, Colonel A. S. Collins 
of New York, Mr. and Mrs. Sydney Webb of London, Eng- 
land, are among the recent guests at the California Hotel. 
Mr. and Mrs. Albert Miller, Miss M. A. Miller, and Mr. 
Paul L. Miller are spending the summer at the Tavern of 
Castle Crag. 

Nearly all society has been out of town the past 
two or three weeks, either settled for a period at 
some one of the resorts or paying visits to friends 
in various directions for a few days at a time. 
The George Popes have had Miss Carrie Taylor, 
Mr. and Mrs. Dan Murphy, and Mr. and Mrs. 
Sam Buckbee visiting them at their country villa 
in San Mateo County. Miss Caro Crocket has 
beea the guest of Miss Helen Hopkins, and Miss 
Juliet Williams and Miss Mary Eyre at Menlo Park ; 
Miss Daisy Van Ness has been staying with Miss 
Alice Hager at San Rafael. Mr. and Mrs. Henry 
Crocker have had several house parties at their 
Cloverdale Villa; Mr. and Mrs. Harry Babcock, 
who are now occupying their nretty cottage at 
Lake Tahoe, have had Mr. J. M. Quay as one of 
their guests, and expect to entertain a succession 
of their friends during their stay in that lovely 
locale. 
Mayor Phelan is rapidly recuperating since his 
arrival there. 

The Hotel Rafael is full to repletion, and the guests 
never tire of singing their praises of the comfort of that 
hostelry and the many delights that accompany a resi- 
dence under its roof-tree. Dr. Herbert Carolan, Everett 
Bee, Clarence Follis, Ned Peixotto, Ed Greenway and 
Ward McAllister are a few of the city beaux who make it 
their headquarters; and some of our most charming 
demoiselles are spending the summer under the shadow 
of old Tamalpais. Mr. and Mrs. W. H . Morrow, Mr. and 

Parties who nave cash to pay can get some wonderful bargain-' in 
pianos for the coming two weeks at Mauvais' Masic Store, Sj. 703 
Market street. . . 

Jackson's Napa Soda water cures dyspepsia. 




Mrs Vim. Pries, Ml* 1 S Van Winkle anil family are 
among the cottagers. Goll will soon be one of the features 
at San Rafael, the management at Hotel Rafael having 
engaged T. W. Tetley of Coronado Beach to lay out and 
com]> ■ inks for the benefit of hotel guest - 

San Rafael residents, with the result that very attractive 
lints were opened to the local people on Tuesday. July 1-tli. 
The opening day was a scene of much golf enthusiasm, the 
limit Ion if Sao Rafael tun ed out in force, and after mak- 
ing thrir Introductory how to the royal ancient game, 
many were to he seen struggling with the alpha of the 
Bwirg under the tutelage of the coach. Among the 
ardent devotees were noticed Mesdames Carroll, P. Jar- 
boe, Arnold. Misses Dean, Barton. O'Connor, Morgan; 
also C. de Young and Henry von Sehroeder. The links 
are situated in picturesque Happy Valley, and are worth 
a visit from any lover of golf. Natural hazards and 
bunkers abound, and the enticing drives from the top of 
ridges are particularly fascinating. 

Life at Del Monte is a continued round of pleasant do- 
ings — tennis, golf, bicycle rides, surf and tank bathing, 
driving, picnics, fishing, feasting, and dancing all combine 
to render a visit there truly delightful. Dr. and Mrs. 
Albert Abrams, Miss Eleanor Woods, Mrs. and Miss 



euuiiiijinuiiiniiiiiuiiiiuiniiiiiiiiiniiiiimiiiniittnniiimima 

A Leather Lesson 

Thick leather isn't always durable. Thin 
leather isn't always comfortable. Oily 
leather isn't always waterproof. Dear 
leather isn't always best. Low price leather 
Isn't always cheap. Vici Kid is always re- 
liable. This is the reason it is fast super- 
seding all other leathers. Vicl Kid is the 
only leather that repels the cold, yet ab- 
sorbs no heat. It is the only leather free 
from oil, yet Impervious to water. It is 
the only leather soft enough for com fort, JS 
strong- enough for any kind of wear. Jga 

VICI KIDJI 

makes the most beautiful shoes for 
women, the most comfortable 
shoes for men, the most durable 
sriuM for children (alloolorK). The 
gsnuine never varies in quality, 
no matter where you get It. 
Genuine Vici Kid is made only 
by R. H. Foerderer. To In- 
sure getting it and not an imi- 
tation, ask your dealer for 
Foerderer's Vici Kid. Vici 
Leather Dressing makes 
all shoes look better and 
wear better. 

Ask your deale 
A book about oi 
wearing and earn 
shoes mailed fre 

ROBERT II. 
FOERMERER, 
Philadelphia. 




P. A. WILLIAMS, 

MINES. 



Roort 



1207 Claus Spreckels Building, 

San Francisco, Cal., U, S. £, 

Cable Address "Claret." 



)R. T. FELIX GOURAUD'S ORIENTAL 
CREAM, OR MAGICAL BEAUTIFIER. 



Removes Tan, Pimples, Freckles, Moth 
Patches, Rash, and Skin Diseases, and. 
every blemish on beauty, and defies de- 
tection. It has stood the test of 48 years- 
nnd is so harmless we taste it to be sure 
it is properly made. Accept no counter' 
feit of similar name. Dr. L. A Sayre 
said to a lady of the haut-ton (a pa- 
tient) : "As you ladies will use them, F 
recommend ' Gouraud's Cream ' as the 
least harmful of all the Skin prepara- 
tions." For sale by all Druggists and 
Fancy-goods Dealers in the United 
States, Canadas, and Europe. 




FERD. T. HOPKINS, Prop'r. 

37 Great Jones St., N. Y. 



-CO M'.WS l.h'l 



July 16, 1898. 



Houjrbtoo. Mrs. H. M. A. Miiler. Mrs. M. P. Jooes- 

Foffis. Chris. Froelicb. Dr. Jim Kt 

Major and Mrs. Davis, Mrs. aod Miss Ida - 

Miss L/Oagfcboroagh, Mrs. McBean aod Miss Edith are a 

' those who have bee- lonte rectntlv. Mr. 

aod Mrs. Fred Sharon, Mrs. LIo.v- 1 
Alexander are among those wb 

seaside. Golf is tbe prevailing; erase at Dei Monv 
season, aod th<- 

Eastern plajers hart tbe lead, but it 

is said to be on.;. :.me— and a sbort time at 

that — ere Calif Jmiaos will be quite as expert b 

ise who are now causing tbem so much er. 

Mrs. Jeremiah Clarke is one of tb^ '. tbe Sea 

Beach at Santa Cruz, as well as Mrs. George Gi'ibs and 
her niece. Mrs Kane, of New York. S bad 

quite a pleasant party there d. days. 

which included among others Miss India Scott and Miss 
Martel. Mrs. Blair and Miss month 

j 

jronado for a vera! 

weeks. Mr. aod Mrs. Tom Watson have returned from a 
six months' absence, durir. g me tbey have made a 

. rouod tbe world. Mr. George Crocker was also one 
• arrivals of tbe week from Sea tr and 

Mrs. Frank Carolan aod Miss Genevieve are nearly due 
here from their European trip. Tbey arrived in New 
York last week. Mrs. O 

again on American soil from their trip abroad, and 
spend the rest of the summer at Newport. Mr. and 

Gwin aDd lovely Miss Mav Belle are in Washington. 
I 

At Kenilworth Inn recent arrivals are Mrs. K. M. Bost- 
wick, wife of L : .' M. Bostwick. ' tbe 

.arlestoo. who is rU W. E 

.-.e; Miss Helen Wilder, and Miss M. Jobcson. 

Recent guests at < . . Mrs. Lucy Bed- 

ington aod ber sod Henry. Mrs. Ira Pier e, Miss Sophie 
Pierce, Mrs. Bicbard Bav :Ierrin, Mr. and Mrs. 

Bachman. Mr. and Mrs. Dae Cole, and Fred Greenwood. 



SUNBEAMS. 

j ear old Tommie was sent by bis eldest sister to tbe 
corner grocery to buy a pound of sugar. After tbe pro- 
prietor of the shop had made the change for tbe lit: 
.'aged Tommie in convert, 
erstaod there is a new member of your far 

ed the ki r re got a little bi 
bow do you like tea- 
man, ther bave a 
Tber why a 

- can. 
You see. we have used him four days now 

'- =■ . -.- -nail t-bap to be ruDnin" an 

I b?. . me caus' 

times with the bear:- r id tbe fat mac 

walked. — Clevelanc 

"Wall, said the Spaniard as be turoeo 
use of our borrowing 

we can get without I . -ton Star. 

Warn — I r.eard tha'. - i are 

wearing re -od Wue gi- 

— Indianapolis Journal 

7H, -Pupil, to tears «eji 



himtT* Shonaaxu: 

\mz LatWzi ltrecrl.ovpM 

jku.a» • Pun Cum*. I 
praaa of S:»-jt Oea*t. aod Oaot :rr. 



■I _■- ftqan Kt< '-■'. -- ':-.. . 



Miimoiif -•rji:rt»'. ST.. dealt 
a bu>'.aea> pertooa! 
1 



WHILE THE WAR LASTS. 

All who IM. 

■ 

Uttered, t* - 

- : id comfort without it 
Earn* it sold trr all dnurrist^ and shoe stores. £k- - ani- 
- jlmmed. Le Roy, N. Y. 

College van Szafael 

For Young Ladies. 

Winter term commences August 4th, 1898 

Conducted by the Sister* of St. DorclAlc. 
Full oollegle course of studies. A boarding school of highest 
grade. Superb modern building. Steam bested. Beautiful 
and commodious class rooms. Music and art rooms. 

Located In the lovely Magnolia Valley. 
for beauty and bealtbrolness. Address. 

MOTHER SUPERIOR. 

College San Rafael. San Rafael. Gal 



- v>la 



IRVING INSTITUTE 



■ ; 



2"- z — r-i 

Accredited b Seminary and full Conservatory of 

Music. Priu-sry i1)i|Hl MiMMll lor rbildreiL A 
formation ad * * initial. 

Rev. Edward B. Church. A. H. 

TRINITY SCHOOL. $£^2**" ******* 

Monday n * 

.1 1 1 f ornia and ibe Le- 
ty A oorpfc of eleven lea 

Rev. Dr. Spalding. Rector, 
3300 VTat»niiitrton imeet, S F. 

1R. and MRS DICKINSON'S 
ACADEMY.^ 

"2*~ S F. 

Reopens August I, 1 898. 



En? 



i L»ay -srhooL 
- for universities, business, 



:-d ejttni 



Hi jx-r inoutb. 



HRS. C. H. BEANE'S SELECT SCHOOL 

new term A^UST 1. 1898- 

All Enrlteb - Iro special attention given to Ibe 

oonraeaf study followed t>y tbe public schools. 

. ars apply at 

9 MISSION STREET, San Francisco. 



LUDL/IM -> 

928 Sutler St. 



ELOCUTION and 

DRAMATIC ART 



Tbe SOLL/ WALTER School ot Illustration. 






2i Fartell Street 



San Francisco Dress-Gutting School, 

French tailor method taught. Full course of instruction In the 
art of Dressmaking. Patterns cut to order. Terms reasonable. 

NO. 916 MARKET ST., Opposite the Emporium, San Francisco- 



JolmTlllK). 



As a table water is unsurpassed. 
— London Hospital Gazette. 



July 1 6, i 



SAX rRAXCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



»3 



NSURANOE 



C5SIONER Andrew J. Clunie has cnocludi 
pleasant sum hut j.iui.i lo New York u < 

Noue are more forcibly impressed with his fait 
than the publisher ami editor of a local insurant <■ paper 
called the Review. During Mr. Clunie's absence the 
editor or publisher, or some one else who had authi 
gain access to the Review's font of type, took occasion to 
• lr. Clunie several different kinds of unkind names, 
and one of the Commissioner's first acts upon his arrival, 
and after getting bis clothes brushed and bis boots pol- 
ished, was to have the Review men arrested for criminal 
libel. 

For twenty •. wo years the Knapsack, a humorous paper, 
has been pub.Uhed annually under the auspices of the 
Qnderwriters' Association. At the last annual meeting 
it was decided to collect the series and have them bound in 
book form. This is now being done under the personal 
direction of Geo. P. Grant, and copies will soon be ready 
for distribution at the office of the Secretary, 106 Leides- 
dorff street. 

A recent decision of the Supreme Court of the District 
of Columbia reaffirms former decision of the courts to the 
effect that blank forms are not protected' by the copy- 
right law. Certain forms, however, used by insurance 
offices, such as policies, which are practically completed 
documents, requiring only that the names of the policy- 
holders should be supplied, have been entered in the office 
of the Librarian of Congress. What such entry may be 
held worth by the courts would perhaps remain to be 
seen, as no cases have as yet arisen concerning them. 
They have to be entered, though, as books. If under- 
writers submit samples of forms to the librarian, he will 
examine them, and write whether any can be entered, 
and indicate which. 

The general opinion appears to be that the companies 
on this coast either owe the State the taxes contended for 
by Commissioner Clunie, or they do not. If they do the 
Commissioner has no right under the law to abate them. 
The Supreme Court says they do not owe these taxes, but 
the companies probably think it cheaper to pay the 
amounts demanded than to submit to the annoyance and 
expense that the Commissioner undoubtedly has the power 
and inclination to occasion. 

In New York the insurance men made up the largest 
number of the recruits who left their employment to 
enlist. 

Col. Jacob L. Greene, President of the Connecticut 
Life of Hartford, has had conferred on him the degree of 
Master of Arts by Yale University. 

Chas. G. Smith, Secretary of the German-American 
Insurance Company, commenced the duties of his new 
position last week, and many underwriters called at the 
company's office to express their good wishes. 

It is suggested, for uniformity, oy a prominent under- 
writer, that in attaching revenue stamps to fi re policies 
they be attached to the face of the policy, to the left of 
the written form. In case of a policy with attached 
printed form, place stamp so that it will lap the line of 
connection of the printed form cover, partly on the printed 
form and partly on the policy itself. 

ON Sunday, the 31st inst.. the Southern Pacific Com- 
pany will run an excursion to Santa Cruz at the pop- 
ular rate of $2 for the round trip. This will give an ex- 
cellent opportunity for cily folks to take a delightful ride, 
a plunge into the surf and a generally enjoyable day, all for 
$2. Col. Menton will have charge of the excursion. 

A Panorama 440 Miles Long 
From the Observation Car on the Sew York Central a living pan- 
orama 440 miles long may be seen. This include! the Genesse, 
Black River and Mohawk Valleys and 143 miles ut the Hudson 
River, including the foothills of the Adirondack Mountains; the 
. Capitol at Albany; tb> Catskill Mountains; the' Palisades of tbe 
Hudson and the New York Central's magnificent approach to the 
metropolis— this being the only trunk line whose tiaivr enter the 

citv of New *ork. __^ 

Fines tatlonery, steel ana oopper-plate engraving. Cooper 6, Co., 748 
Marketstreet.SanFranol sco. 

• Sober ap.on Jackson's Napa Soda. 




g 

#' l,„/„,//'fr tgttf 

CupUal Subscribed 94 482 760 

LONDON ASSURANCE. c. P it.i p.td u P 2.2*1.375 

Assets 19,195,145 

Capital Subscribed $5,000,000 

OCEAN MARINE. capital p»m up 500,000 

Assets 2,502,050 

___ INSURANCE. 

FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

Firemans Fund 

INSURANCE COMPANY, OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Capital, $1,000,000. Assets, $3,500,000. 



PALATINE 



INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited), OF MANCHESTER, ENGLAND. 
SOLID SECURITY. OVER $9,000,000.00 RESOURCES 

CHAS. A. LATON, Manager 489 California St., S. F. 
Fibi Insurance. 

CONNECTICUT FIRE INSURANCE CO. OF HARTFORD. 

Capital Paid U P 11,000,000 

Assets 8,800,018 

Surplus to Polloy Holders ; 1,668,882 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager. 
COLIN M. BOYD. n. W. Cor. Sacramento and Montgomery Sts., S. F. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INSURANCE CO., LIMITED, 

OF LIVERPOOL. 
Oajiltal , 16,700,001 

BALFOUR, 3UTHRIE & CO., Agents, 

No. 816 California St., S. F 

Founded A. D. 1702 

Insurance Company ot Nortn America 

OF PHILADELPHIA, PENN. 

Paid-up Capital 18,000,000 

Surplus to Polloy Holders 6,022,016 

JAMES D. BAILEY, General Agent, 412 California St., S. F. 

ROYAL EXCHANGE ASSURANCE, OF LONDON. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, A. D. 1726. 

Capital Paid Up, »3,446,100. Assets, $21,684,413. 

Surplus to Policy Holders, 88,980,261. 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager. FRANK W. DICKSON, Ass't Manager. 
501-503 Montgomery St., corner Sacramento. 

PHOENIX ASSURANCE CO. OF LONDON Established 1782. 
PROVIDENCE-WASHINGTON INSURANCE CO. &«»**«* mm 

BUTLER & HALDAN, General Agents, 

418 California St., S* 

THE THURINGIA INSURANCE COMPANY. 

Of ERFURT, GEltlJAN '. . 
Capital, •»2.-25O,O0O Assets, J10.984.248. 

Paolflo Coast Department : 204-208 SANSOME ST., S. F. ,, . ; ; 

, i, VOSS, CONRAD a CO., General jxuanagws . 

,'J ,:, :ia r . . . ' :'i,i , , ' ' "-" '■ l v -'" ' 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 16, 1898. 



Southern Pacific Co. —Pacific System. 

Trains Leave and are Due to Arrive at SAN FRANCISCO: 

(Main Line. Foot of Market Street.) 



Leave. | 



From JUly T>, 1898. 



I Arrive 



4: 



:00a Niles, San Jose, and way stations *8:45A 

00 a Benlcla. Suisun, and Sacramento 10 :46 a 

:00 a Marysville. Orovllle, and Redding, via Woodland h-Ahp 

00 a Elmira, Vacavllle and Rumsey 8:45 P 

:30 A Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, Napa, Calistoga, Santa Rosa 6:15 P 

:00 a Atlantic Express, Ogden and East — 8:45 P 

:80a San Jose, Stockton, Valley Spring, lone, Sacramento, 

Marysville. Cbico, Tehama, and Red Bluff 4:15P 

;80 A Peters, Oakdale, and Jamestown 7:1ft p 

:30a Milton *7:15P 

:00a New Orleans Express, Merced. Fresno, Bakerstleld, Santa 
Barbara, Los Angeles, Demlng, El Paso, New Orleans, and 

East 6 :45 P 

:00a Vallejo, Martinez, and way stations 7.45 p 

:O0p Sacramento River steamers *9:uo p 

... San Jose, Niles, and Way Stations J9:15A 

00 P Llvermore, Mendota, Hanford, and Vlsalia 4:16 p 

.... Llvermore, San Jose, NUes and vVay Stations — ... 110:15a 

:00 p Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, Napa, Calistoga, El Verano 

and Santa Rosa 9:15a 

:00 p Benlcla, Vacavllle, Woodland, Knight's Landing, Marys- 
ville, Orovllle, and Sacramento 10 :45 a 

:30 p Niles, San Jose, Tracy, and Stockton 7 : 1ft P 

:30 P Stockton and Lodi 12:15 P 

:80 p Laituop, Modesto, Merced. Fresno, Mojave, Santa Barbara 

and Los Angeles . 7:45 a 

:30 P Martinez, Merced, (Raymond for Yosemlte) and Fresno 18:15 V 

:8u p Santa Fe Route, Atlantic Express, for Mojave and East ... 6:46 p 

:ju p European mall, Ogden 'and East 9:45 A 

:00P Vallejo lMftp 

00 P Uaywards. Niles and San Jose 7 45 a 

:00 P Vallejo, Port Costa, and way statioos I9:45p 

:00p Oregon Express, Sacramento, Marysville, Redding, Port- 
land. Pueet Sound and East 8 :1ft a 



San Leandro and Haywahds Local. (Foot of Market St.) 



8:00a] 

9:00 a 

10:00 a 

111. 00 A I 

IK' :Hl M \ 
i3'0U p 
5:00 P 
7:00 P I 



Melrose, Seminary Park, 

FlTCHBURO, ELMHDR8T, 

San Leandru. 
Sunm San Leandro. 
Estudillo, Lorenzo. 
Cberrt, and Haywards 

i Runs through to NUes. 
t From Niles. 



7:15 A 

(•9:45 A 
10:45 A 
11:45 A 
13:45 P 
'1:45 P 
J2:45 P 
th :45 P 
7:45 P 



Coast Division (Narrow Gauge). (Foot of Market St.) 

J7:45 a Santa Cruz Excursion, Santa Cruz and Principal Way 

Stations 18:05 P 

8:15 a Newark, ^entervt lie. San Jose, Felton, Boulder Creek, Santa 

Cruz and way stations 5 :50 p 

•2:1b p Newark, Centervllle, San Jose, New Almaden, Felton, Boul- 
der Creek, Santa Cruz, and principal way stations *10:5oa 

4 :15 p San Jose, Qlenwood and way stations 9 :20 a 

a4:15P Boulder Creek and Santa Cruz j 9:20 a 

CREEK ROUTE FERRY. 

From San Francisco— Foot of Market street (Slip 8).- 
11:00 A. m., 11:00. •8:00. 13:00. «4:00, 15:00 and *6:0OP. 11. 

From Oakland— Foot of Broadway.— *6 :00, 8 :00, 10 :00 A. 
t2:00,*8:00, 14:00 »5:00P. M. 



:16. 9:00, and 
; J12:00,*l:00, 



Coast Division (Broad Gauge). (Third and Townsend streets). 



•7:00 a 
J7:3ua 



10:40A 
11:30 a 
•2:45 P 



San Jose and way stations (New Almaden Wednesdays only) 1 :30 p 
Sunday Excursion for San Jose, Santa Cruz, Pacific Grove, 

and Principal Way Stations 18:35 p 

San Jose, Tres Plnos, Santa Cruz, Pacific Grove, Paso Robles 

San Luis Obispo, Guadalupe. Surf and prlnclpalway stations 4:10 f 

San Jose and way stations *8:00a 

San Jose and way stations *8 :35 a 

San Mateo, Redwood, Menlo Park, Palo Alto Santa Clara, 
San Jose. Gllroy, Hollister, Santa Cruz, Salinas, Mon- 
terey and Pacific Grove ...*10:S6A 

•3:30 p San Jose and Way Stations *9:00 A 

•1:16 P San Jose and Principal Way Stations 9:45a 

•5:00 p San Jose and Principal Way Stations 6:35A 

b :80p San Jose and principal way stations 5:30p 

6:30p San Jose and way stations 7:30 p 

tl I :46p San Jose and way stations 7 :30 p 

A for Morning, p for Afternoon. "Sundays excepted. tSaturdays only. 
[Sundays only. 

j Sundays and Mondays. 



1 
a Saturdays and S indays. 



The Pacific Transfer Company will oall for and check baggage from 
hotels and residences. Enquire of Ticket Agents for Time Cards and 
Other Information. 

Occidental and Oriental Steamship Co. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Steamers leave wharf, FIRST and BRANNAN STREETS, at 1 p ■., for 

YOKOHAMA AND HONGKONG. 

calling at tvobe (Hioeo), Nagasaki and Shanghai, and connecting at 
Hongkong with steamers for India, etc No cargo received on board on 
day of sailing. 

Gaelic (via Hono'ulu) Tuesday. July 96, 1898 

Doric (via Honolulu) Saturday. August 13. 18V8 

Bilgic (via Honolulu) Saturday. September 3. 1898 

Coptic (via Honolulu) Thursday, Sept. 22, it98 

Rodnd Trip Tickets at Reduced Rates 

Vor freight or passage apply at Company*. Office, No. 421 Market street, 
corner First. D. D. STUBBS, General Manager. 



San Francisco and North Pacific R'y Co. 



SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. Tiboron Ferry- Foot of MarketStreet. 

WEEK DAYS— 7:30, 9:00, 11:00 A m; 12:35,3:30 5:10.6:30 ph. Thursdays- 
Extra trip at 11:30 p m. Saturdays— Extra trips at l :50 and 11:30 p m. 
SUNDAYS— 8:00,9:30, 11:00a m; 1:30, 3:30, 5:0U,6:2OPM. 

SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO. 

WEEK DAYS— 6:10,7:50,9:20, 11:10 AM; 12:45,3:40,5:10pm. Saturdays- 
Extra trips at 1:55 and 6:35 pm. 
SUNDAYS— 8:10, 9:40, 11:10 am; 1:40, 340, 5:00, 6:25 P M. 

Between San Francisco and Schuetzen Park, same schedule as above. 



Leave 


S. F. 


In EDect June *6, 1898 


ARRIVE INS. F. 


Week Days. 


Sundays. 


Destination. 


Sundays 

10:40 AM 
6:10 pm 
7:35 pm 


Week Days 


7:30am 
3:30pm 
5:10 pm 


8:00 am 
9:30AM 
6:00 PM 


Novato, 
Petaluma, 
Santa Rosa. 


8:40 AM 
10:25 A M 
0:22 p M 


"7-30AM " 
8:30 PH 


3:00 AM 


Pulton. Windsor, 

Healdsburg, 
Qeyservllle. Cloverdale 


7:85PM 


10:26 A M 

6:22 P M 


7:30 am 
3:30 pm 


8:00 AM 


Hopland, Uklah 


7:85 PM 


10 :2S A M 
6:22 PM 


7:30A m 
3:30PM 


8:00AM 


Guernevllle. 


7:35PM 


10:25 A M 
6:22 P M 


7:30am 
5:10PM 


8:00AM 
5:00PM 


Sonoma, 

Glen Ellen. 


10:40 am 
8:10pm 


8:40 A M 
6:22 P M 


7:30AM 
9:30PM 


8:00AM 

5:00pm 


Sevastopol. 


10:40 AM 
7:35 PM 


10:26 A M 
6:22 P M 



Stages connect at Santa Rosa for Mark West Springs; at Lytton for 
Lytton Springs; at Geyservlllp forSkaggs' Springs; at Cloverdale fortbe 
Geysers; at Hopland for Duncan Springs. Highland Springs, Kelsey- 
vllle. Carlsbad Springs, Soda Bay, Lakeport, and Bartlett Springs; at 
Ukiab. for Vichy Springs, Saratoga Springs. Blue Lakes, Laurel Del 
Lake, Upper Lake, Porno, Potter Valley. John Day's. Riverside. Ller- 
ley's. Bucknelt's Sanhedrlo Heights, Hullville, Boonevllle, Orr's Springs, 
Mendocino City, Ft. Bragg. Westport, Usal. 

Saturday-to-Monday Round Trip Tiokets at reduoed rates. On Sundays, 
Round Trip Tickets to all points beyond San Rafael at half rates 

TICKET OFFICE— 650 Market St., Chronicle Building. 
A . W. FOSTER, Pres. & Gen. Manager. R. X. RYAN, Gen. Pass . Agent. 



Santa Fe 
Route 



Santa Fe Paelrk- R R. Co. 
61 Chronicle Building, S.F. 



REMOVAL N0TIGE. 

After July 1, 1898, the Freight and 
Passenger offices of this company 
will be located at 

628 Market Street. 

H C BOSH, General Agent Freight Dept. 
JOHN L, TBOBLOW, General Ag't Pa>s I 



Pacific Coast Steamship Co. 



t^ 



Steamers leave Broadway 
Wharf, San Francisco. 
For Alaskan ports, 10 a. m. 
July 5, 10, 15. 20. SS, 30; August -J; transfer at Seattle. 

For Alaskan ports (from Folsom St. wharf ) 10 A. m., 
July 17: August -i, 85; transfer at Portland, Or 

For R. C. and Puget Sound Ports, 10 a. m., July 5, 
10, 15. 20, 2.=>, 30; Aug 4, and every fifth dav thereafter. 

For Eureka (Humboldt Bayt i0 a. m., July 1, 7, 13. 19, 
^5. 31; August fl, and every sixth day thereafter. 

For Newport iLos Angeles) and way ports, 9 a. m. July 
4. s 12. i6, 20, 24, 28; August l, and every fourth day 

For San Diego, stopping only at Port Harford, Santa Barbara, Port Los 
Angeles. Redondo, (Los Angeles) 11 a. m , July 2,6, 10, 14. 18. 22. 26, 80; 
August 3, and every fourth day thereafter 

For Mexican ports, 10 a. u.. July 17: August 11. 

For further Information obtain folder. 

The company reserves the right to change, without previous notice, 
steamers, sailing dates, and hours of sailing. 

TICKET OFFICE— No. 4 New Montgomery street. (Palace Hotel.) 
G0ODALL PERKINS & CO., Gen. Agts., 10 Market St.. San Francisco 



thereafter. 



EANIC 




up-- 1 



SS • Mariposa. "Wednesday Aug. 10th at2p m. 
Line to Coolgardte, Australia, and Capetown 
South Africa. 

J. D SPRECKELS i BROS CO. 



Agents, 114 Montgomery St 

Market St Sft»> Krftnolson 



Freight office, 827 



The splendid many-hued shawl of Chantilly lace 

ordered by the French government as a present to the 
czarina as a memorial of her visit to France was designed 
by M. Aubert. who is a painter, and woven by Norman 
workwomen of the Caux district. The shawl is three 
meters in length, and is worked out in garlands of narcissi, 
crowns of pink and yellow roses, and lilies, with the im- 
perial monogram in gold at the four corners. 



Price per Copy, 10 Cents. 



Annual 5iiAsrri/./i'on . $4.00 









Vol.LVH. 



SAN FRANCISCO, JULY 23, 1898. 



Numler 4. 



I and published .rtry Saturday by the proprietor. FRElt VJRRIdTT 
&4 Kearny street. San Francisco. / S HI Francisco Post- 

ojtec as Second class Matter. 

TKs ojlee nf the IfgIVS LETTER in Xnr Tor* lily is at Tempi, (nun: 
and at Chicago, 903 Itoyre Building (Frank E MoTtton, Eastern 
Representatire) tchere information may be obtained regarding subscrip- 
tion and adcertising rates. 



THE Bobrd of Health confesses itself greatly discour- 
aged, and as being almost ready to give up the cru- 
sade aaainst impure food as a hopeless fight. The good 
work done by the Board has been always recognized by 
the people of this city, aud to discontinue its efforts now 
would be a public misfortune. Greed and competition are 
powerful stimulants of trickery; aud the man who calls 
himself strictly honest will often, without hesitation, sand 
his sugar, adulterate his fruits, and water his milk. An 
active Board of Health is a powerful agent of commercial 
virtue, and the present officials have made a record that 
commends them to the hearty hatred of purveyors of adul- 
tered abominations in this city. Honest merchants and a 
discriminating public love them for the enemies they have 
made. Their missionary work in this fruitful field should 
not abate. 

THE pay of the volunteer soldier is small; and if we are 
to believe recurring reports, bis bed and board at 
San Francisco are not calculated to increase his avoirdu- 
poise. In view of these facts it would be a just act for 
the street railway companies to charge him but half fare 
from the camp to the city aud return. This could be eas- 
ily accomplished by collecting full fare into town, with free 
return to the camp. The California and Union street lines 
allow the soldiers to ride free upon presentation of a card 
or ticket from their Adjutants. This is to prevent the 
soldiers from passing the time in riding back and forth just 
for the pleasure of the trip. Other lines could do a grace- 
ful act by at least taxing the boys but half fare. To say 
that hundreds of them should ride without paying every 
day might be asking a little toi much, but half-fare would 
certainly be a dividing line that everybody would com- 
mend. 

THE ill-advised but well-meant efforts of the posse of 
officers sent out by the Sheriff of Alameda County to 
capture a Chinaman who, having killed a fellow- 
countryman, thoughtfully took refuge in a pow- 
der magazine, resulted exactly as might have 
been anticipated. The Mongolian warned his 
pursuers that he would choose a shorter route 
to the hereafter than is provided by the Cali- 
/ fornia criminal courts, if they attempted to 
take him. Armed with a pistol (presumably 
hair-trigger), and prepared on the instant to 
carry his threat into annihilating execution, 
the efforts of the men whose zeal relieved them 
nf the last spark of judgment, and also unfor- 
tunately, of their lives, ended as was to have 
been expected. The Chinaman is a fatalist, and 
he is utterly fearless of death under certain cir- 
cumstances. Gong Chang was evidently in ear- 
nest, and his warning should have been accepted 
for all it was worth. Criticism of those whose 
lives paid the instant forfeit of their foolhardi- 
ness is not in order; but it is simply astounding 
that they were notable to foresee in their attack upon 
the Chinaman in his retreat, their instant and separate 
dispatch. 




SCHOOL Boar'', experts who have been engaged in 
checking up the lumber scandal have been making 
discoveries on the wrong side of the balance sheet. They 
are finding that the difference between what the city paid 
for, and what it got, is not so great as originally reported. 
This looks suspicious. It is against precedent; however, 
it is important if true. But, having made mistakes in the 
first instance, how are we to accept the correction as be 
ing correct ? Must we engage experts to expert the ex- 
perts ? 

THE expected has happened in the case of the river 
steamers that were built on the Sound and at Port- 
land for the Alaska trade on the Yukon. They have, with 
but two exceptions, gone to the bottom of the sea. Twelve 
of these frail craft have not been heard of for thirty days, 
and they should have arrived at St. Michaels or have been 
spoken by passing vessels. Built in the most flimsy man- 
ner, it is but reasonable to suppose that they have all been 
lost. That sane men should trust their fortunes and lives 
in such mere shells shows a foolhardines 1 ' that is incompre- 
hensible. Many of them evidently have settled their earthly 
accounts and gone where the glamour and greed of gold 
cannot disturb them. 

LAST week the News Letter noted an instance of gross 
negligence upon the part of the Western Union Tele- 
graph Company and its unnecessary delay in settling a 
just claim arising therefrom. Morning papers of Wednes- 
day show that the Western Union figures as defendant in 
a damage suit for $2200, the loss resulting from an ad- 
mitted error in transmission of a dispatch. With bland 
and child-like simplicity the company sets up in defense the 
fact that a heavy storm was raging when the message was 
sent, and consequently the act of God and not the act of a 
stupid employee, was to be charged with the loss. The 
company failed to add a point upon which we are in 
doubt: Did the storm prevent the exaction of the usual 
toll? 

SN immense amount of water is being squeezed out of 
mining shares just now. For the purpose of evading 
the two cent internal revenue stamp which the law re- 
quires to be placed on every share of $100 that may be 
transferred, many of the companies are reducing their 
capital stock from millions to modest hundreds of thous- 
ands, and the par value of shares from $100 to anywhere 
from $1.00 to $3.00— The Julia, to $1.00 per share; Union 
Consolidated, $2.50; the Mexican, $3.00; Chollar, $3.00; 
Con. Cal- Virginia, $2.50; Occidental, $3.00; Alpha, $1,00; 
Bullion, $1.00; Potosi, $1.00; North Fork Gold, $1.00. 
Doubtless other companies will pursue this course, as it is 
the only alternative. Capital stocks must be reduced or 
the companies go out of business. 

ftT last the troops located at Camp Merritt are to be 
moved to the Presidio. It is time. They should have 
gone months ago; in fact, should never have been tented 
at the old race-track at all. The Presidio is the ideal 
home for the soldiers. Camp Merritt was chosen to help 
out a certain lot of contractors, as was shown in last 
week's News Letter. It is surprising that practical mili- 
tary men should have been induced to make such a selec- 
tion as the race-track, and it reflects little credit on those 
choosing it that after the facts had been pointed out it 
required the indignant protest of city authorities, Cham- 
ber of Commerce, and the press to pierce the thick offi- 
cial epidermis of those in command. Reluctance in doing 
the manifestly right thing by the officers leaves an un- 
pleasant taste in the public mouth. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 23. is y 8. 



THE PRESIDENT PROCLAIMS A NEW CONSTITUTION. 

PRESIDENT McKINLEY'S letter of instructions to 
General Shafter, relating to the Government of the 
City and province of Santiago de Cuba, bears evidence of 
being a maturely considered and carefully prepared docu- 
ment. As it obviously embodies the policy of the Adminis- 
tration for the Government of our Colonies beyond the seas, 
it is an instrument of rare interest that is destined to be- 
come historical. Without much doubt, General Merritt 
and General Otis have carried similar proclamations with 
them to the Philippines and Hawaii. Translations are to 
be made into the languages of the different countries, and 
instructions have been given to circulate printed copies 
widely among the people, to the end that they may know 
and respect the Constitution under which they are ex- 
pected to live, thrive, and become happy. It is a new, 
sudden, and surprising departure from old-time traditions, 
and one, the full significance of which, it is hard to realize 
all at once. Having conquered, occupied, and given forms 
of government to foreign possessions, we now stand fully 
committed to a policy of expansion, and distant Colonies, 
that are to be ruled, not by the consent of the governed, 
but as vassals of the sovereign will of the American peo- 
ple. We who, as colonists, declaimed against "taxation 
without representation as robbery, and conducted a suc- 
cessful rebellion on that ground, are to-day, through a 
Military Governor, imposing taxes upon the people of our 
lately conquered Province without saying so much as "by 
your leave." That may be all right. It is the way of the 
world, but it has not heretofore been our way, and it has 
always been held that it never would be. It may be that 
ultimately civilization will be advanced, and the good of the 
world promoted by what is now happening, and, if so, it 
may be said that "the end sanctifies the means;" a doc- 
trine which, by the way, thinking and conscientious men 
have scouted ever since the dark ages. 

But to return to Mr. McKinley's brand new colonial con- 
stitution. It is ominously silent as to what is to be done 
with, and for, the Cuban "patriots" who fought and bled 
for their independence, as we fought and bled for ours. 
They might have failed to drive out the Spaniards but for 
our assistance, just as we might have failed to drive out 
the English but for the help of the soldiers of France and 
the money contributions of Spain, but that does not in it- 
self justify our giving the go-by to our allies before Santiago. 
What would have been thought of Lafayette had he at the 
end of the war endeavored to set aside Washington after 
the fashion in which Shafter has been instructed to ignore 
Garcia? Of course, events have developed guod ground 
for different action in the two cases. Our revolutionists 
did better than win freedom — they deserved it. The Cuban 
insurgents have proven themselves to be, as all good 
authorities predicted they would, utterly worthless. They 
were never anything better than a set of banditti, who 
from their mountain fastnesses practiced guerrilla war- 
fare, in order that they might live upon the country. 
With their appetites satiated before Santiago, they would 
neither work nor fight, and to-day they are sulking in 
their tents, because they would not be permitted to enter 
the city and give rein to their passion for plunder, outrage 
and murder. It would have been a crime against human- 
ity to have given such wretches any sort of authority 
in the place. But all this ought to have been foreseen, 
and known, before Congress pledged itself before the world 
to its high-fallutin resolution, and before our Commanders 
ar-ned, clothed, fed and made allies of them. In view of 
this experience, the original motive for the war has disap- 
peared. We have stepped into the shoes of the Spanish 
and now have the insurgents on our hands. It is clear 
that we cannot place the government in their keeping, 
and. if we do not, it is pretty certain that they will go 
back to the mountains and fight us as they did the Dons. 
Unhappily, the same kind of troubles are looming up in the 
Philippines. We ought to have known that it has ever 
been thus with foreign conquests. Our people had to 
learn the lesson, even though they knew not the cost. In 
time, they will learn to beware of Jingo politicians and 
Jingo journals. 

To the business men, planters, and the better class of 
Cubans generally, the President's proclamation will come 
as a confidence inspiring and peace promoting document. 



Their right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness is 
guaranteed, and the forces of an irresistible government 
are there to make good that guarantee. The local laws, 
which are better understood by the people than foreign 
ones would be, are to be continued in force until Congress 
shall otherwise direct. The judges, magistrates, police, 
and other officials who accept the supremacy of the United 
States, are to continue to discbarge their functions, being 
responsible alone to the Military Governor, who, in his 
turn, will be responsible to the President of the United 
States. No property o' non-oombatants is to be taken by 
our Government, except upon just compensation being 
made therefor. No religious tests or preferences are to 
be created, but all alike are to be free to follow the dic- 
tates of their individual consciences. The conquered Pro- 
vince, is, in short, to have a better government than it 
ever knew before. Soon business will revive, the planting 
of sugar, tobacco, and other crops, being assured of its 
reward, will be pursued with renewed energy, American 
capital and skill will flow into the place, and an era of 
peace and prosperity may be confidently predicted. The 
most suggestive item in the President's programme, is, 
perhaps, that relating to fiscal arrangements. The tariff 
of duties now levied against Spain is to be in force against 
all nations, the United States included. This commits the 
President to "the open door" policy in all our Colonies. 
It is a step that will be much discussed, but will hardly be 
retraced. The progress and prosperity that this experi- 
ment in governing will bring, may be relied upon to cause 
the majority of Cubans to ultimately vote for annexation 
to this country. Stability and freedom are better than 
ever-recurring revolutions. 

The New Bonds It appears that the subscriptions for 
and the the new Government three per cent. 

National Banks, bonds will amount to about one billion 
dollars, or five times the amount asked 
for. This is a highly satisfactory result from every point 
of view. It places the credit of the United States on a 
par with the best, and strengthens the Government both 
at home and abroad. It was the one thing necessary to 
demonstrate that we possess within the country every ele- 
ment essentia] to successful warfare. We had already 
shown that we bad the necessary men and ships, and now 
it is made apparent to all the world, in the words of the 
music hall song, that " by jingo, we have the money, too." 
Of the whole amount subscribed, about $55,000,000 of it 
comes from people in moderate circumstances, in sums not 
over $500; the balance comes from banks, insurance com- 
panies, corporations, and private capitalists. It is the 
first serious attempt to get the securities of the Govern- 
ment placed around among the people, and although its 
success has not equaled that which the early rush for 
bonds had led us to expect, the total is nevertheless satis- 
factory as a beginning. The people will improve upon it 
as they become familiarized with the use of their Govern- 
ment's obligations. It is most desirable that they should. 
The bringing of the finances of the Government closer to 
the attention and interest of the people at large cannot 
fail to prove a strong force in favor of honest money and 
the strict maintenance of the public credit. For this rea- 
son it is to be regretted that there is only too much greund 
for believing that the small bonds will ultimately find their 
way into the hands of the National Banks. For this, the 
existing federal laws are responsible. Government bonds 
are worth more to those institutions than to anybody else, 
and consequently they can afford to pay a high premium 
in order to corral them. The National Banks were created 
for the express purpose of providing a market for United 
States bonds. To this end they were authorized to issue 
notes as against the bonds they held. That meant to the 
banks a double interest return on their bond investments. 
They could draw interest from the Government on the 
bonds, and interest from the general public on their notes. 
The individual caunot do this, and consequently the Gov- 
ernment's bonds are worth more to the banks than to him. 
Accordingly, those bonds will drift bankwards, as long as 
the Government finds it to its advantage to maintain the 
preseot bank-note system. The thing for the new small 
bondholders to do is put their bonds just where the large 
holder puts his: that is, into the capital stock of a National 
Bank. If it is a fairly well managed institution, the stock- 



WITH S F. NEWS LETTER JULY 23, 1898. 



PLATE 13. 




MEN WE KNOW 
JOSIAH R. HOWELL. 



July S3. 1898. 



SAN FRANCISCO NI-WS LETTER. 



holder's money either earns or ought to earn him a double 
dividend. His five hundred dollars' worth of stock should 
earn the Government's three per cent, on the bonds and 
tbe bank customer's five or six per cent, on the notes. 
Of course, it may be that not all incorporators of National 
Banks let their stockholders in on that plane of squaro 
dealing, but that can only be because small stockholders, 
unlike large ones, do not exercise the necessary business 
vigilance, to see that they come by their own. Becoming 
a partner in the nation's banking system ought to be as 
safe, and more profitable, than becoming a sharer in the 
nation's bonds. 



The W»y The 
Soanish At Home 
Are Humbugged. 




It is very exasperating that the 
Spanish people at home cannot be 
reached and made to understand the 
news of the war exactly as it is. Every 
one of their great defeats, since that of Manila, has been 
heralded to them as a glorious victory. That is about all 
they are permitted to know of the painful conditions that 
are overtaking their country. They actually believe, even 
yet, tha* Cervera's dash out of the harbor of Santiago was 
successful, and the Spanish Minister of Marine 
is reported as saying that "'it was a brilliant 
achievement that bad filled every Spanish heart 
with pride." This sort of falsification, it is easy 
to see, is going to prolong the war after every 
consideration of humanity should demand its 
cessation. General Shafter was right in first in- 
forming General Toral of the stern realities of 
his situation, and in then pointing out to him 
that he would not be justified in continuing a 
combat that was already practically over, ex- 
cept the killing. It badly needs a Shafter to 
bring home to the Spanish people a realization 
of where they stand. If that could be done, 
they, like General Toral, would doubtless con- 
clude that "honor" had been satisfied, and that 
discretion had become the better part of valor. 
It is, in this connection, an interesting histori- 
cal fact that for more than three hundred 
years past the Spanish have allowed them- 
selves to be deluded in precisely the same fashion they 
are being to-day. They celebrated the wiping out of their' 
"invincible armada" as a "victory," just as they did the 
obliteration of Cervera theother day. Vice Admiral Drake, 
the renowned circumnavigator, has left a record that 
makes curious reading at a time when history is repeating 
itself. In describing the scenes in which he had so con- 
spicuous a share, the Vice-Admiral said, among other 
things, that: 

'•They (the Spanish) were not ashamed to publish in sundry 
languages in print; great victories in words, which they have pre- 
tended to have obtained against this realm, and spread the same in 
a most false sort, over all partj of France, Italy, and elsewhere, 
when shortly it was happily manifested, in very deed, to all nations 
how their navy, which they termed 'invincible,' consisting of 140 
sail ships, strengthened by the greatest argosies, Portuguese 
carracks, Florentines, and large hulks of other countries, were by 
thirty of Her Majesty's own ships of war, and a few of our own 
merchants, beaten and shuffled together even from the Lizard in 
Cornwall back as far as Portugal, where they shamefully left Don 
Pedro de Valdez, with his mighty ship: from Portland to Calais, 
where they lost Hugh de Moncado with his galleys, and others of 
their ships were chased out of sight of England, around about Scot- 
land and Ireland, where many of them landed in hopes of sympathy 
for their religion. Of the many captives taken or shipped to Eng- 
land, Her Majesty, of her princely disposition, disdaining to put 
them to death, or retain them, sent them all back to their countries 
to witness and recount the worthy achievements of their invincible 
and d-eadful navy. * * * "With all their alarming ostentation, 
they did not in all their sailing around England so much as take or 
sink a ship, bark, pinacle, or even cockboat of ours, and did not so 
much as capture a single sheepcote on this land." 

This curious letter will be found in Creary's "Decisive 
Battles of the World;" a book that makes interesting read- 
ing at this time. 

A Boys' The California Club has secured from the 

Playground. Board of Education the use of a block of 

land on Bush street, near Hyde, which was 

formerly occupied by the Girls' High School, as a playground 

for the boys who live in that part of the city. The block is 



to be fitted up with simple gymnastical apparatus, and 
tbe youngsters are to have tbe use of the playgrounds 
from 1 o'clock in tbe afternoon until (i o'clock in the even- 
ing. There are no restrictions— the grounds are open and 
tbe boys can enjoy tbe utmost freedom consistent with 
good order. 

The necessity of such playgrounds is very generally 
recognized throughout the East, and in nearly all large 
cities blocks of land are held under long lease or owned, 
properlv equipped and maintained for the free use of the 
boys. Police regulations demand that they be kept off 
the streets. In San Francisco the youngsters are pre- 
vented from playing ball, flying kites, or indulging in any 
of the many outdoor recreations that are dear to the 
heart of male childhood. They are compelled to remain 
indoors or go to one of the parks or to the country. This 
is frequently impossible. 

The ladies of the California Club have taken hold of a 
very practical scheme for benefiting the boys of the city. 
It is promised by Mrs. Lovell White and Miss George, 
who are active members of the club, that this is but the 
beginning of its labors in aid of the boys. There can bej. 
no possible doubt of the success of the playground, both' 
from a physical and a moral standpoint. Here is found 
an excellent opportunity for some of our generous and j 
wealthy citizens to expend a part of their gold, gracefully 
perpetuate their names, and accomplish a great deal of 
good. The California Club is to be thanked fey boys young 
and old for tbe first free playground in the city. 

The Volunteer's When the thousands of volunteers first 
Fare. 3 . began to assemble at San Francisco, 
there were heard loud complaints f rota 
the men. Their food was insufficient and its quality bad. - 
They had "salt horse," rusty pork, rotten bacon, bad 
coffee, poor potatoes, and no other vegetables; but, ow- 
ing to the new. and unsettled conditions, .., no- one— 
excepting the sufferers — was disposed to seriously criticise 
the delays, and temporary incompetency of the commissary 
department, for it was thought that the food supply would ! 
soon be equal in, quality and quantity to the reasonable 
wants of the country's soldiers. It seems that the com- 
pliment of confidence in the food department was mis- 
placed. Complaints from the men still continue; they are 
not loud, but decidedly deep, and that cause for their 
utterance exists there can be no doubt. 

That the Government is responsible for this state of 
things we do not believe. On the field, on long marches, 
or upon unusual occasions the fare of the soldier is often 
unsatisfactory; he has to rough it, and as a rule be makes 
no complaint. But here in the heart of the most bountiful 
State in the Union there should be no cause for criticism. 
Fresh meats, vegetables, and fruit in abundance should be 
found on the tables of the volunteers, instead of the corned 
meat, pork and beans, and indifferent bacon that forms' 
their daily fare. The commissary department certainly 
does require an overhauling. The boys who have enlisted 
to fight their country's battles for less than fifty cents per 
day are entitled to some consideration. If they are still 
patriotic after the dietetic course that some of them are 
compelled to endure, their loyalty to their country and 
love of the flag will not require the endorsement of blood 
letting to establish that fact. 

What the City's Last week the city and county's assess- 
Assessment ment roll for the fiscal year of 1898-9 
Roll Shows. made its appearance, and has since at- 
tracted a very natural interest on the 
part of our thousands of taxpayers. It is tbe one docu- 
ment that measures the distance between the tax-eater 
and the taxpayer; between the men who try to run the , 
municipal government and those who ought to run it'. 
This year is an exceptional one in many respects, and the 
labor Of preparing the .assessment roll has been one of 
more than ordinary proportions, which: is saying not a 
little. Values have been undergoing a readjustment, and 
a scaling down. Suburban. lands have touched what is be- 
lieved to be bed-rock prices. Corporations have been 
keeping their cash balances within the narrowest limits, 
and large sums have been put into United States securi- 
ties, where, of course, they escape local taxation. In 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jul} 23, [898. 



view of these conditions, it was expected very naturally 
that the assessment roll of the present year would show a 
very material reduction from that of last. But such has 
been the assiduity of Assessor John D. Siebe and his 
deputies, that they have succeeded in making a substan- 
tial increase at a time when a material reduction was ex- 
pected. It would appear, too, that no mistakes have 
been made in ferreting out the different items liable to the 
personal property tax. So far no appeals have been 
lodged, which is quite an exception to the general rule. 
All of which demonstrates the benefit of a business man, 
acquainted with real and personal values, being charged 
with the strictly practical business of City and County 
Assessor. It is the misfortune of that officer that he has 
to fight three different influences that do not necessarily 
know their business. First, the courts interfere and de- 
cide on ex parte testimony, which is hard to answer; next, 
the Supervisors, as the local Board of Equalization, who 
are always under the influence of "a pull," interfere; and, 
lastly, the State Board of Equalization, which is ever bent 
upon cinching the city for the benefit of the country, is 
always inclined to advance San Francisco's assessments, 
no matter at what figure they may have been placed. 
When to all this is added the very natural desire of prop- 
erty owners to escape taxation, it must be confessed that 
the Assessor of this city and county has a pretty hard 
road to travel. That Assessor Siebe has been able, in 
this exceptional year, to increase the assessment roll by 
$3,82!l,2t>4, without given cause for resistance from any 
quarter, stamps him as the right man in the right place. 

The Tropics Not If we are going in for a policy of ex- 
For Our Race. pansion and foreign conquests, it will 
be well that our future colonies should 
be placed where our race can work, and thrive, and not 
be dependent upon any sort of peon or slave labor. This 
condition has never come to the Caucasian race from set- 
tlement in the tropics. It is not to be found in any one of 
Great Britain's possessions that are within 22 degrees of 
' the equator. The West Indian islands are a case in point, 
the Mauritius is a second, and Fiji is a third. They are 
all in a state of innocuous desuetude, and constitute the 
only conspicuous failures in England's attempts to colon- 
ize. In the whole world around, it is not possible to point 
to a single instance of European colonization within the 
warmer latitudes that is a success. The exueriment has 
been tried in many different places, and for long periods of 
time, but everywhere, and always with the same uniform 
result of dismal failure. The French have won a name as 
conspicuously bad colonizers, but that is because they 
have tried to succeed where failure was inevitable. They 
have turned the once beautiful Tahiti, the gem of the 
Pacific, into a lazar house of debauchery, disease and 
death. Caucasian blood will not run in a healthy stream 
there. Sooner or later the fountain becomes poisoned, 
healthiness departs from the cheek, men and women be- 
come thin and pallid, lose energy and fall victims to 
leprosy and diseases indescribable. This is no fancy pic- 
ture, but is the invariable result experienced bv white 
men within the tropics. On this subject the late Captain 
Gridley, who commanded the ( Hympia at Manila, left on 
record this valuable attestation: A few days before his 
death he said to a correspondent at Nagasaki, Japan, 
that "he had no desire to criticize any plan of the Govern- 
ment, nor to stand against the wishes of the people, but 
he could see nothing in those islands for us, except a coal- 
ing station. Not one in ten could survive there. He sup- 
posed, however, that there must be troops there for a 
time, out the sun, and not the Spaniards, would be their 
enemy " The truth of all that we cannot realize today, 
but we will in time. 

Ins «t Upon Having Your Ticket to New York, Boston, or 

Other Eastern Cities 
Read over the Nickel Plate (H. Y. 0. A fit. L. R. R.), the popular 
low-rate short line, quicklime, unexcelled accommodations, and 
no extra fares charged. Jay W. Adams, Pacific Coast Passenger 
Agent, 37 Crocker Building, s.m Francisco, Cal. 

Mothers, be sure and use " Mrs. Wloslow's Soothing Syrup •' for your 
ohildren while teething. 

Kick if you don't get pure Jackson's Napa Soda. 




THE PLACE FILLED. 

The Grocer's Roy.— An' you have n't got anyone in Delia's 
place yet ? 

Mrs. Fi.atti: - oh. yes I have! PBAJtLIKB does the work 
better and it does n't have any afternoons off. break dishes or 
entertain policemen in the kitchen. — Ftnm I'i'cK. New York. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE, 

Hiberma Savings and Loan Society. 

Office of cne Hlbernla Savings and Loan Society, corner Market. McAllis- 
ter, and Jones streets, San Francisco, .lu e 29, 1898 At a regular meeting 
of the Board of Directors of this Society, held this day, a dividend has been 
deolared at the rate of three and lnre»--flf'bs (3 S-n) per cent, per annum on 
all deposits for the six months ending June 80, 1898, free from all taxes, 
and payable on and after July 1, 1808. 

ROBERT J. TOBIN, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Oceanic Steamship Company. 

Dividend No. 83, Fifty cents per share, of the Oceanic Steamship Com- 
pany, will be payable at the office of the company, 3-.17 Market street, on 
and arter Monday. August l, 1-98. Transfer books will close on Tuesday, 
July 26. 1898, at 3 o'clock P, M. E. H. SHELDON, Secretary. 

Office— 327 Market street, San Francisco, Cal. 




CHICAGO FORM CO 



It excels all others because It puts the 
strelcb directly on the wrinkles; the middle 
or seam part of the leg is free. Garment 
hangs by front and rear parts. It is quickly 
applied and is uncqualed. Furnishers sell 
them cr we mall them for the price. Address 
DEPT. I.. 125 LA SALLE ST., Chicago, 111. 



Trade supplied by Equipment and Supply Co., 514 Kearny St., S. F. 



P. A. WILLIAMS, 



MINES. 



Room 1207 Claus Spreckels Building. 
San Frarcisco, Cal., U. S. #. 

CABLE ADDRESS "CLARET." 



IS YOUR * 

TITLE 

PERFECT? 



If vou have any doubt, consult tbe 

California Title Insurance and Trust Co. 

Insurance policies puarant--elDp titles to be 
perfect Issued and abstracts made and con- 
tinued. Money to loan on real estate 
Offlce-Mllls Building 



Henry L. Davjs. Picsldent. Cbas D. Stuart, Secretary. 



July 13, 1898. 



SAX FRANCISCO NI-WS LETTEK 



LINES. 



TO be carnally minded is death 
T.i the spirit »' well as the clay ; 
Like a blark blighting fro-t ia tiie l>realh 

Dl me lusls that we love to obey ; 

How they lure 111 and lead us astray ' 
How they bmlo for body lad 

How they not by nlgbl and by day. 
And our passionate pulses control! 
Whin the lights and the laughter and song. 

And the wine and the women of lust 
Teach the blood of our boyhood to long, 

I'o we think of the whirlwind's hoi gust? 

Do we dream that life's apples are dust 
Do we dread the dark dregs in the wine? 

No! we barter life's breed for a crust, 
And a draught that is bitter as brine. 
Recollection may call up the past. 

That comfortless mocker of ill; 
But it fades in the withering blast 

Of the whirlwind's heart-harrowing chill. 

For this, Oh ! for this do we till, 
And bury the soul in the soil 

Of a past that the present doth kill, 
Of a future from which we recoil. 

Though the flesh may be fed to the Bre, 

Until nothing but ashes remain ; 
Yet the smouldering coals of desire 

Still lingering live in the brain, 

When the senses are silent or slain. 
By remembrance they're often cajoled, 

But 'tis fancy that forges a chain, 
Whose fetters a skeleton hold. 

Can the lips that with eagerness drain 

The lust-leavened cup to the lees, 
Can the soul with a sensual strain, 

Ever know the sweet freedom that frees? 

Can passion's extortionate fees 
By the flesh fettered profligate paid, 

The soul in its sorrowing ease, 
Or the body in agony aid? 
San Francisco, July 23, 1898. Louis A. Robertson. 



WITH this issue of the News Letter is added another 
to the long list of "Men We Know" in the person of 
Mr. Josiah E. Howell, junior member of the well-known 
real estate incorporation of Baldwin & Howell. The sub- 
ject of this sketch is a young man, a native son of Cali- 
fornia, and for many years a resident of San Francisco. 
For the past ten years he has been connected with the 
real estate business of the city in the employ of those of 
whom the present firm is successor. Mr. Howell was. re- 
cently made a member of the Non- Partisan Municipal 
Committee — an organization whose object is to secure to 
San Francisco clean business methods and honest muni- 
cipal control. His continuous connection with the real 
estate business of this city has given him .exceptional op- 
portunity for a knowledge of values, and his souDd, con- 
servative judgment has been frequently verified in the 
fortunate investments of clients who have profited by his 
advice. Mr. Howell is an example of the prosperous 
young business man who owes his success to his own faith- 
ful and conscientious efforts. 



AVERY imposing legal document was filed in the Su- 
preme Court on Tuesday: It was a brief of three 
hundred pages in the Fair will case, One of the items of 
interest in the present proceedings is that the name of W. 
F. Herrin appears as counsel for the heirs of the dead 
millionaire. With him are associated Messrs. Garber, 
Boalt, Bishop and Wheeler, and Wilson & Wilson. 

ONLY one dollar to Santa Rosa and return Sunday, 
(to-morrow) July 24, by the San Francisco & North 
Pacific Railway. Get tickets at Tiburon ferry, from 
which dock boats leave at 8 and 9:30 a. m. 



New line of picture frames, in metal, gold, and old oak, green 
vory, and Japanese gray; also elegant line of picture mouldings. 
Jobn F. Kennedy, Art Dealer, 19 and 21 Post street. 

Mhs. Emily R. Eastman, artist, Invites her friends and patrons to 
visit her at her studio, 1035 Market street, opposite O'Brien's. 



When playing poker drink Jackson's Nana Soda. 




"A PERFECT FOOD - .is HfeolMOOM n» /( fa 

Dflirimts." - 

Walter Baker & Cols- 



Breakfast 

Cocoa 

The Standard for 
Purity and 
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Trade-Mark. 

Costs less than one cent a cup 

Our Trade-Mark on Every Package. 





WALTER BAKER & CO. Ltd. 



DORCHESTER, MASS. 

ESTABLISHED 1700. 



********** 




ANNUAL MEETING. 

Virginia & Gold Hill Water Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Virginia and Gold 
Hill Water Company will he held at the office of the company, room 81, 
Nevada Block, 809 Montgomery street, San Francisco, CaL, on 

THURSDAY, the 28th DAY OF JULY. 1898. 

at the hourof 11 o'clock a, m., for the purpose of electing a Board of Direc- 
tors to serve for the ensuing year and the transaction of such other busi- 
ness as may come before the meeting. 

D C. BATES. Seoretary. 
Office: Room 81, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 

ANNUAL MEETING- 

Hakalau Plantation Company, 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Hakalau 
Plantation Company will be held at the office of the company, 327 Mar- 
ket street, San Francisco, CaL, on 

MONDAY, THE 1ST DAY OF AUGUST, 1898, 

at the hour of 1 1 o'clock a. m. , for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors 
to serve for the ensuing year, and for the transaction of such other business 
as may come before the meeting. Transfer books will close on Friday, 
July 2e>, 1898, at 3 o'clock P m 

E. H. SHELDON, Secretary. 
Office— 327 Market's treet, San Franolsco, CaL 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Risdon Iron and Locomotive Works. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Risdon. Iron and 
Locomotive Works will be held at the office of the company, southeast 
corner' of Beale and Howard streets, San Francisco, Cal., on 

MONDAY, THE 1st DAY OF AUGUST, 1898, 

atthehourof 11 o'clock A. m., for the purpose of electing a Board of Trus- 
tees to serve for the ensuing year, and the transaction of such other busi- 
ness as may be brought before the meeting. 

L. R. MEAD, Secretary. 
Office: Southeast corner of Beale and Howard streets, San Francisco, 
California. 



UNITED STATES 
LAUNDRY. 



Office, 1004 Market Street. 



Telephone South 420, 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



LA GRANDE LAUNDRY, 



Telephone Bush 12 



Principal office, 23 Powell St., opp, Baldwin Hotel. 

Branch— 11 Taylor St.. near Golden Gate avenue. 

Laundry— Twelfth St., between Folsomand Howard Sts., San Francisco. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




ot*y bo waod ba: pltr*s»ne"¥-~— Tom Jfoerf I 



•• T IBERTY HALL is tbe kind of 
]_/ p'.av that makes yon come away 
thinking what a sw c I the 

- . . -ing to human 

. that we accept it gratef. '.rue picture of 

-ere may be little frets and in- 
Dg tbe way. peace and eontentroer: 
jad the corner, and" meekly ac 
all come riitht in the e »* unblush- 

i 

I I know of nothing p'.easanter than to be 
taken in for two or three bours by subtle flattery. It is 

to the educated mind to have it daubed 
in me lot the man who _ in delicate 

- judiciously into recognii 

:.re at 
botte- .'£ an audience. It - 

dattery which accounts for the pope 

of wholesome actios. 

♦ • ♦ 

Lit*rt) Hill will take a Jong time to get more otd-fash- 
loned than it always was. It is as much up-to-date now as 
when it was first prouueed. five years ago, for these 
stories, w : ■> show us hun;- out always 

human nature m a haa* fairy atmosphere, 

above all that dear old legend of aa aristocrat who takes 
on humble guise in order to win the maid of his choice by 
love alone, have a pereanial charm. In spite of the cynic- 
ism of the age. and the tendency of modern authors to 
make their heroes and heroines' even more wicked and 
ridiculous than men and women really are. there is a steady- 
demand for books deaaag with just such subjects at 

- a has dealt with in his play. It is not only susceptt- 
■■ which makes them go. it is the hopeless 
even tbe cynics themselves en- 
joy them cow and then as much as any one. — they have to 
-ng sometimes. They may be as much ashamed of 
tag them as one of Charlotte M Yonge's readers 
would be of enjoying Zola, (if they are very young cynics 
-. - ■■ ■ :.-.:: is.; -i-..; ■-' s. . : - _ i - ■•.;-.« 
is so rooted in the nineteenth century heart that intelli- 
gence protests in vain. 

♦ + ♦ 

Mr. Carton was evidently in his Dickens period when he 
wrote Lii*rtf Hit', as Messrs. Murray Carson and Louis 
Parker were in their Dickens period w hen they wrote 
The bast of Charles Dickens occupies the 
• of "eocor ■ tbe cuddle m the awartrikjacee mthe bank 
parlor of Mr. Tcdman s shop, aad that odd conglomeration 
of people at Mr. Todman's party is dlsttr 
of Dickens. It is Dickens humor, aad Dickens sentiment, 
aco DmtCM idea mattta .-; tH age aad Dmmaoaf fee* :-:c- 
ditkn. aad tbe types are Dickens types— Mr. Todamaa, 
Mr. Todman's servant, Mr. Todman's shop be 

% and they are really very charming aad very 
r oui frwwaV. aad verv welcome after the fooCsh 
> af the last few * 



are so frequently called upon to play 
parts which are out of tbtir special 
line, the Frawley company's perform- 
ance merits a good d* at of praise. 
Mr. Theodore Roberts' William Tod- 
man sustains his reputation as an ex- 
ceptional artist. I do not think his 
performance in the first act could 
be improved ; he expressed the 
old man's embarrassment in the an- 
cestral home of the Chil worths with- 
out a particle of undue exaggeration. 
Mr. Roberts marked well Todman's 
greater confidence in himself when at 
home in bis own back parlor, only it 
seemed to me that he had not quite' 
decided his age. and. in consequence, 
certain gestures and speeches gbk- 
gested a baler man than his sei 
emotion would lead us to suppose 
was. *-is very good 

Mr. Owen, the aristocrat in dmgd 
and he improved as the play went 
■■< i i : - s : -.'---' :- 

pected. ' raightfom 

mi: ly sort of part, and the feel 
whicn Mr. Bell put into the m 
ser?-s passages van limvahl] 
strained and fully appare 
Hade an Bnotna had hy far tta : 

•;: -:--:-:: •:; :ii ::: 
season: it is not aa easy part, bo 
is full of opportunities for aa into 

;-:'. - --ss ^: : \ t: :i: - t. i - 
to the satisfaction of the grea 

■. *—. ' :;: -. f: - : - '. - .1 
•:' i - : •-. .j . z ::? ::- :iirj 
S , - ■, .": ^:r:z 1 -i_- > 
-., ;: a: .: ;. : i: -_:■:-:;. 
at her disposal. I heard, tot 
it evening, which might a 
-- : i . : — i : ■ 

these things could not ace 
-t : : t -1 ': -' -:- - j: ': 
7:t - i-:: :: : r-iss : : :. . e :: 
-.- ■ - - :_- : — f :: ;i- — i.r i' 
facing. Blanche is a 




if- :,- 
ofl 



:.- it: z 
lacked i". :z 
hare rer: : 
:'.-- : f >-•:: 
was gee tie 1 
ter Amy, b 
the matt H 



■■teal ha 

tad m tint 

^e_. H ■ 



i 



- 

. ets. aad as its opportunities tor 'toucaes of 

?t the two or-. 

- ' - - V j 



ami - mi 



la the short tone w 

ah a e e cimu na t s i:s:,-.Vii mtp.:>- :.; 

"jC possmiiiaes of such a piny as 
It ueftu so ava,h upanrtiinity for indiTsmai ea- 

" "-' ' ; " '•' ' ' ■-- -- ■ - - : - -- : -" -: rex 

into ewanina, ami toe :'*..-. thai i.. -.,:rs ■ ameh Dtawaaa ■ 







t 

! 



July 23. 1898. 

■ns did not "repeat one of his greatest succi 
M a Dumber of the papers announced; he plaveri 1! 

.^pard. the miser, for the first time He has only 
ene with the money, but that is a treat scene. Mr. 
■ ■ns drew it out to a wearisome length and 
me further by not taking the money out of thi 
spreading it on the table; at least he only took a litt 
of one bag. Barry Sine', the great and onlv 6a 
of the English stage, used to have lhe stage 
littered with gold coins at the end of the act. and the 
effect was incomparably better. Mr. Phil. Branson 
acted better than he sang as the fisherman. Mr. 
was good as the Baillie, and Mr. Raffael, as usual, as the 
Marquis. Mr. Kavanaugb coulu cot fail to make a suc- 
cess of the fat little part of the Notary. The male chorus 
was notably good again. 

Next week Thi /{■■/■/,ir Student will be revived, in which 
the sweet voice of clever Miss Carrie Roma will be heard 
again; and on Monday evening. August 1st, the grand 
opera season opens with a performance of Aiia. This 
opera will be given on Monday, Wednesday, Friday, and 
Saturday evenings, and Lucia di Lammermoor on the other 
evenings of the week and at the Saturday matinee. 
# * * 

The hold-overs are much the best of the Orpheum en- 
tertainment this week, the Shaws, the Harts, the Contes, 
and Fleurette easily sustaining their popularity. Next 
week Mr. Hart and Miss de Mar will appear in a new act 
entitled "Dr. Cbauncey's Visit," in which Miss de Mar 
will wear a glass hat, the latest Parisian novelty. There 
wiil also be the Sisters Macarte, who do a slack-wire act, 
W. H. Windon, alto, and his Blackstone Quartette, the 
Angela Sisters, and Wilton & Stack, horizontal bar per- 
formers. 

An elaborate production of A Gallant Surrender, Edwin 
E. Kidder's new war play, is promised at the Columbia 
next Monday. Mr. Kidder is the author of several of Sol 
Smith Russell's most successful plays. Miss May Buckley 
has been engaged to play an important part in A Gallant 
Surrender, and is sure to make a notable addition to the 
company. Miss Buckley is already well known here by 
the clever work she did at the Alcazar. She was singled 
out for special praise by several of the London critics 
when she appeared in The First Born, and was a member 
of John Drew's company last season and continues her en- 
gagement with him next season. There will be fifty sol- 
diers from Camp Merritt on the stage in the third act of 
A Gallant Surrender, and Mr. Alfred Hickman will sing 
"The Star Spangled Banner," supported by the soldiers 
as chorus. 

I cannot do better than give the Alcazar announcement 
in the press-agent's own language : " Mephisto betakes 
himself to his mythical realms at the close of to-morrow 
evening's performance, for Faust will have completed its 
run of two weeks to business the largest of the Morrison 
season by twofold. Beginning with to-morrow evening's 
performance Lewis Morrison and his excellent leading sup- 
port, Miss Florence Roberts, will assume the roles of Cap- 
tain Levison and Lady Isabel, respectively, in Fust Lynne, 
a play in maturity when many of us were at school. Yet, 
like many other stable pieces it grows interesting with 
age, and an annual revival goes not amiss with any well- 
regulated stock-house. Frederic Vroom, late with Booth 
and Barrett, also Modjeska, becomes the Alcazar's new 
leading man, opening next week in the role of Archibald 
Carlyle in Fast Lynne. Mr. Vroom is a good looker, a 
handsome dresser, and his stage record finds him associ- 
ated with some of the greatest of dramatic companies." 

The gentleman's drink— J. F. Cutter and Argonaut; for these fine 
liquors have gained in popularity as they have become better kno«n. 
Everyone that likes pure whiskey will be pleased with these melluw 
goods. Sole agents for the United States are E. Martin & Cj.. 411 
Market street. 

The Japanese are building a great navy ; and George T. Marsh & 
Co., are in receipt of a magnificent line of Japanese art goods- 
carvings in ivory, lacquer ware, tapestries, satsuma, etc. Call in and 
see their new gouds at 625 Market street, under the Palace Hotel. 

Flowers are always sweet and always in order. Get the nicest 
ones at Leopold's, 35 Post street. 

All sensible people drink Jackson's NapaSjda. 



FRANC ISCO M.WS LETTER. 




EVANS' 
ALE 

Ii limply a uWi I'rewcii tnd perfectly- bottled air, 

Rich in Bouquet, 
Sparkling in Brilliancy, 
Creamy in Head, 
riellow in Flavor, 

And all in b degree that makes it the standard i< i tin 
masters all over tin* world. 

fbu don 1 ! ha,<- to order direct. Beery dealer xni>i»Uex if. 

SHERWOOD & SHERWOOD. 
Pacifir ast Agents. 



San Francisco. 



Los Angeles . 



Columbia Theatre, 



The "Gem" Theatre of the Coast. 
Frlcdlander, Goitlub & Co., Lessees 

An event of importance. Beginning next Mi nday night, 

The Fruwley Company, presenting for the first time on any stage 

the new war drama, 

A GALLANT SURRENDER, 

By ECward E. Kidder, Superbly staged: a great cast. 
In preparation: His Absent E,oy, 

ni T*L -L Fred Belasco, Lessee. 

/tlCaZar I neatre. Mark Thall, Manager. 'Phone Main 254. 

To-night and to-morrow. Punday. Lewis Morrison in Faust. 
Monday, July 25th. Tenth week of the celebrated actor, Louis 
Morrison.Isupported by ft"iss Florence Roberts, when will be 
presented the emotional drama, 

EAST LYNNE. 

Seats now on sale. Prices: 15c, 25c,, 35c, 50c, reserved. 



Tivoii Opera House. 



Mrs. Ernestine KreliDg, 

Proprietor and Manager, 

Last nights: The Bells of Corneville. 
Next week, last week of the comic opera season. 
Regal revival of Milloecker's superb work, 

THE BEGGAR STUDENT. 

Great cast; new scenery; correct costumes. 
Monday, August 1st: Opening Grand Op»cra Season. Reper- 
toire first week: ' Aida," " Lucia di Lammermoor. 1 ' 
Special Saturday matinee. 
Box office always open. (No Phone.) Popular prices, 25c. and 50c. 



San Francisco's Greatest Music Hall. O'Farrell St., 
between Stockton and Powell streets. 



Orpheum. 

Week commencing Monday, July 25th. Direct from Europe, the 

SISTERS MAGARTE, . . 

Extraordinary exponents of equipoise; the famous trio, the An- 
gela Sisters, refined musical artistes; the well?km<wn alto, Wm, 
H. "Wlndom. assisted by the famous Blackstone Quartette; posi- 
tive appearance of Wilton & Stack, the world's greatest hori- 
zontal bar performers; the favorite comedian, Joseph Hart, 
assisted by the clever Carrie De Mar is Mr. Hart's original 
sketch, "Dr. Chauneey's Visit;" Valmnre, 'The Instrumental 
Man"; Gilbert & Goldie, in an entire ohange of songs and 
storie^; Lorenz & Allen, eccentric comedians and dancers. 
Matinees Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday. 
Reserved seats 25c; balcony 10c; opera chairs and box seats 50c. 

H. ISAAG dOMEiS, M. D. 

Eye, Ear, Nose, ar\d Throat. 

Office, 223 Post street, between Grant avenue and Stockton Sts., S. F. 
Hours, 10 a. m. to 4 p. m. Sunday by appointment. 

Tel. Grant 101. 

MoetfT 
Cbandcni 

White Seal (Grand CuveeJ ^unsur- 
passed in quality, dryness and flavor. 






Times. 






SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 23 i» v 8 



RACONTEURS _OF THE CLUBS. 

CLUB life develops conviviality, personal peculiarities. 
and the art of story telling; and our local clubs have 
brought out a good many brilliant raconteurs. But their 
local atmosphere has a separate and distinct coloring — 
a sort of individuality as clearly defined as the flavors 
of different wines to the palate of the connoisseur. Thus, 
in the University Club the tales that are told lean 
strongly to the classic. Paul Jarboe tells very fetching 
stories about the wanderings of Ulysses which have never 
been mentioned by the classical authors. His descriptions 
of the jollification at that high tea which Circe gave when 
the fountains belched forth wine, would be a valuable con- 
tribution to any library. 



Mr. Crit Thornton has won distinction for his remark- 
able tale of distant travel. It was immediately subse- 
quent to a visit to New York that he earned his spurs as 
a raconteur. He was profoundly impressed with what he 
saw in Gotham, and in an after-dinner speech at the Bo- 
hemian Club he glowingly discoursed upon the sights he 
saw and sounds heard in New York. " Why, gentlemen," 
said he, " the trains run there right along the streets, 
as high as the second stories of buildings. Oj Broad- 
way there are cars that convey the traveler to his dnstina- 
tion as ours do here. The climate, gentlemen, is different 
from ours, and in the winter, when the snow lit-s heavy on 
the ground, the inhabitants use sleighs. His description 
of Central Park was no less realistic and touching. At 
the conclusion of his entertaining speech, George Nagle 
arose, and in a voice trembling with illy-suppressed emo- 
tion, offered the following toast: "To that distinguished 
traveler, Mr. Chrit Thornton, who discovered New York." 

• • * 

Dr. Beverley Cole is an ambitious but not a great story 
teller. And for a man of his extensive experience, his 
repertoire is rather limited. For many years the doctor's 
star yarn has been about "those carriage boots." This 
interesting tale is based upon a sale made by a shoemaker 
to an unsuspecting customer. To watch the doctor's ex- 
pressive countenance as he describes the astonishment 
with which the customer beholds the boots fly asunder on 
the very first day of wear, is indeed a highly intellectual 
treat. As he approaches the climax he grows almost pur- 
ple from restrained mirth, and by the time he reaches the 
side-splitting termination, where the shoemaker tells his 
customer that those boots were not for street wear, but 
were carriage boots, the shrieks of laughter that follow 
shake the rafters of the Bohemian Club. 

# * * 

Uncle George Bromley won his spurs as a story-teller 
when many of the raconteurs of to-day were learning to 
lisp "papa and mamma." Mr. Bromley's anecdotes em- 
brace a wide extent of territory. When he was conductor 
on the first railway in the State, the line between Sacra- 
mento and Folsom, he never bothered himself about taking 
up the tickets if fairly embarked in a good yarn. On one 
occasion conductor Bromley found it necessary to eject an 
impecunious passenger. He had halted in the middle of a 
story to put the fellow off. "Throw me that valise," said 
the tramp, pointing to one under the seat. Mr. Bromley 
promptly flung it to him, and moved off to finish his story. 
When the train arrived at Folsom the unpleasant fact be- 
came apparent that the valise the quick-witted tramp ob- 
tained was not his property, but belonged to the gentle- 
man who was listening to Mr. Bromley's story. 

♦ * * 

Mr. Bromley's nautical tales are immense. There is one 
which is always a favorite with the boys and which has 
been related to succeeding generations of Bohemians in 
their turn. It is about a New England skipper, who was 
clawing off a lee shore. This anecdote will be recognized 
from the Sierras to the sea. The Stewart, a green hand, 
stuck his head up the after-hatch and informed the anxious 
mariner that supper was ready. 

' Supper ' yelled the skipper, "we'll have sand for 
supper. Skin down below and put on a clean shirt. You'll 
be in h 1! in five minutes." 

It is gratifying to learn upon Mr. Bromley's authority 



that the schooner weathered the reef and the captain 
made a hearty meal of salt cod-fish. 

* # * 

General Barnes is a delightful story-teller. He does 
not belong to the "that reminds me " class, but invariably 
switches off the well-beaten track to new fields. A law- 
yer sees many curious phases of life, and General Barnes, 
during his years of extensive practice, has had many 
queer clients. From these he has gleaned and stored many 
tales, humorous and pathetic, which are most absorbing 
and interesting. He is a peculiar story-teller, arranging 
his sentences as if they had been already written out, and 
making a completeness in the history, giving each event 
its proper place, which gives its bearers the impression 
of having had the story read to them from the pages of a 
book. 

* * * 

James A. Thompson, President of the Bohemian Club, is 
one of the prime raconteurs of the clubs. He has a very 
amusing lot, and tells them well on his feet when making 
an after-dinner speech, which is a rare faculty. This 
George Augustus Sala possessed in the highest degree. It 
is an invaluable art to one who has to make speeches, and 
the B ihemian's President is, by virtue of his office, in con- 
stant demand. Mr. Thompson's stories are told with the 
impression as if he was much surprised at them himself, 
and this at once puts him en rapport with his hearers. 

ONLY one dollar to Santa Rosa and return Sunday, 
(to-morrow) July 24, by the San Francisco & North 
Pacific Railway. Get tickets at Tiburon ferry, from 
which dock boats leave at 8 and 9:30 a. m. 



No Other so Good. 
The social life of the present century creates conditions of mother- 
hood which many times prevent lhe natural supply of food for in- 
fants. No so-called infant food equals the Gail Borden Eagle Brand 
Condensed Milk. 

Flag Pins, Buttons, Belt Buckles, Hat Pins, etc., sterling silver, enam- 
elled, and gilt. J. N. Brittaln, Jeweler, 22 Geary street. 

For a cool head — drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 

OOOOOOOOOOOOOOO-OOOOOO-OOOOOOOOy 



iANDY CATHARTIC 

CURE CONSTIPATION 




Constipation Afflicts 

part of the people all the time, 
all the people part of the time. 
Ate you a chronic or occasional sufferer from constipation ? 1 
Do you want a sure, pure cure ? 

CASCARETS (eat 'em like candy) will stimulate ; 
your liver, regulate your bowels, leave your 
food clean and rich, sweeten your breath and , 
make your stomach do its work. 

CASCARETS KILL DISEASE GERMS, cure 
sck headache, taste good and do good, please | 
tie children, destroy and drive off worms and 1 
o her parasites. 

A ioc bcx will prove their merit, and put you on 
the right road to perfect and permanent health. Try ! 
a ioc box to-day 1 If not pleased, get your money 
back. Larger boxes, 25c or 50c. 

iADDRSn 
Ster ng Remedy Co. 
CHICAGO on 
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5 OOOOOOOOOOOOO CKK><M>CKX><KM>0-0-r>0-0 C 



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ASKING ' ^3 


mm/ imitations i 



July 23 1898. 



SAN FRANCISCO NKWS LETTER. 




M R. Charles Webb Howard has been a close attendant 
i'L upon the lectures given by Dr. Thomas Clifford All- 
butt. Regius Professor of Physic. University of Cambridge, 
England. The reason of this desire for medical know 
on the part of Charles Webb can be easily explained by 
the fact that Dr. Clifford lectures upon the" Heart. Now, 
though the Professor is a most entertaining lecturer, es- 
pecially upon such an absorbing topic as chronic cardio- 
arterial disease, he somewhat disappoints. He gives a 
most entertaining account of conjested hearts, fatty de- 
generated hearts, serio-comic hearts, non-functional 
hearts, but when he speaks of strain of the heart and in- 
cidentally mentioned that the heart oould bear twenty 
times more strain on it than is generally supposed, a dizzy 
red-headed blonde, with a marvelous bonnet, leaned over 
to her medical escort, and whispered lo idly: "I should 
say that the heart could be strained and not feel it. Look 
at Dr. Ellinwood and that all-round winner, Dr. Somers. 
I guess Allbult's alright, and knows something about the 
heart when he sees Dr. Kahn and a few other heart- 
b.nashers. But they ain't in it with the soldier-boys, are 
they?" 

* * * 

When Stevenson wrote his famous 
story, "Dr. Jekyl and Mr. Hyde," peo- 
ple thought such : a creation could not 
be true to life, until they began to cast 
round in their own experience, and 
they discovered the wonder that no one 
had evei unearthed the fraud before. 
It may not be generally known that we 
have a Dr. Jekyl and Mr. Hyde right 
here in our midst, a most respectable 
man of high position and strict morality, 
a devoted husband and indulgent father, 
the reverse — or dual picture — showing 
a wicked old reprobate, a Lothario, who 
tias an establishment not legalized by 
{'/■/■' law, with a fair friend at the head of it, 

WL ^?T where, his time is ..- passed when on 

"business trips." The strange part of 
it is that the old chap has never been! 
found out in all these "years that he has been leading a dual 
existence. To be sure there have been stray rumors, nods 
and winks, when his extra respectability was quoted, but 
it is only recently that people have "got on" to the locale, 
etc. Before long it will be. an open fact, if the weekly 

hegira is not discontinued. 

* * * 

A certain travelling swell nephew of an Irish baron and 
his wife the daughter or granddaughter of an earl tell a 
good story upon themselves. The gentleman has a pro- 
nounced Irish name and he was asked by a friendly Ameri- 
can: "Are you an Englishman?" "No indeed I am not. 
I am an Irishman." "Born in Ireland, eh?" "Yes, I was 
born in Ireland." "Well, well, who would have thought 
it," continued his new friend innocently. "I'll be hanged 
if you don't talk like an Englishman, and an educated 
Englishman too." The future baron stared, and then 
smiled. "Yes indeed," he replied, "I have been often told 
that. It is my misfortune." "Oh don't mind," said the 
San Franciscan, with charming candor. "It might do you 
some harm right here, but I guess you're all right in 
London." 



When a woman faints, it is always advisable for her 
to be careful to have somebody around who has a tender 
heart and a gentle spirit. Now, Mr. Lillis is 'tihat man! 
When last Tuesday a woman fainted away when she saw 
her son sail on for the distant West as a soldier, Mr. Lillis 
did not dash cruel, cold sea water in her face. No 1 He 
whispered a magic word in her ear and she awoke. It 
was another case of Pygmalion, and Galatea, and that 
woman was the envied "of all women that day. Happy, 
happy, Pygmalion!- . 




fl.de LUZE& FILS 



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Fine Clarets and 
Sames. 



hi Cases, Quarts, and Pints, 




CHARLES MEINECKE & CO. 

Sole Agents. 
314 Sacramento St., San Francisco. 




GRAY BROS., 



316 Montgomery St., S. F. 

203 New High St., Los Angeles. 



fi oncrete and . . . 
Artificial Stone WorK. 



Bon Marcne 
Glotnino Renovatoru 

20 Ellis Street, room 1-2. 



SUITS CLEANED 
AND PRESSED 



$1.00 



L. B. NORDLUND 



BRUSHES 



For barbers, bakers, bootblacks, bath-bouses, bil- 
liard tables, brewers, book-binders, candy-makers, 
oanners, dyers, flour-mills, foundries, laundries, 
paper-hangers, printers, painters, shoe factories, 
stable men, tar-roofers, tanners, tailors, etc. 



BUCHANAN BROS., 

BRUSH MANUFACTURERS, 609 Sacramento St.. S. F Tel. 5610. 

Laurel Hill Gemeteru 

ASSOCIATION. Sells burial lots and 
graves. Perpetual care. 
Junction of Bush St. and Central Ave.. S. F. 

DR. BYRON W. HAINES 



14 Grant Avenue 
Rooms 16-17-18-19 



Dentist 



d. D. SULLIUAN 

Attorney-at-LaW 
Rooms 34-38, 3d Floor Chronicle Building, San Francisco. 

DR. c). NICHOLS, 

(Formerly County Physloian of Amador County.) 

Office: 21 Powell street, corner Powell and Ellis. Residence, 
St. Nicholas Hotel. Market St. Hours : 1 to 4 p. m. ; 7 to 8 p. m. 
Established since 1872 in San Francisco. 

Joseph Gillott's Steel Pens, 

Gold Medals. Paris. 1878-1880. These pens are "the 
best in the world." Sole agent for the United States. 
Mr, Henry Hob, 91 John street, New York. 
Sold by all Stationers. ... 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 23, 1898. 




EDNA Wallace Hopper's press agent is a peacb. First 
was the nose bleed; second, a startliDg runaway; and 
now the wee little body has been Trilbyized by a real flesh 
and blood Svengali, in'the shape of a handsome, steel-eyed 
doctor, who was called upon to prescribe for her. True, 
the doctor denies the soft impeachment, but sympathy goes 
out all the same for la petite Californienne, and everybody 
will want to see the new Trilby when she appears in Yan- 
kee Dooillc Dandy at the Casino. 

* # * 

The California girl is the heroine of many fictitious 
stories. When the space writer is at fault he quickly 
dashes off a story in which some beautiful Daughter of the 
Golden West figures, and sometimes reputable journals 
print the stuff. The latest, printed last Sunday, runs this 
way: 

" She was a San Francisco girl, who had come to New York to 
stud}- singing. Her expenses were heavy, and she received little 
assistance from home, for her parents were very poor, and then 
there were several younger brothers and sisters to be provided for. 
She had determined, therefore, to do any kind of respectable work 
from which she might receive funds to aid her in perfecting her 
course of study in music; so she answered a Herald "ad" for a 
model. She had never posed before. Luckily she fell in proper 
hands, and she posed and earned money to keep up her vocal studies 
and kept herself pure and undefiled. Her voice developed until she 
attracted the attention of a comic opera manager, and now she has 
an engagement for the coming season. She poses no longer. Virtue 
has its own reward. Tovjours! 

* * * 

President Collis P. Huntington of the Southern Pacific 
knows a good thing when he sees it, and what he wants he 
generally gets. There are some exceptions to the rule, 
and when finding his bank account in a healthy condition, 
he subscribed for $1,000,000 of the new war bonds, he fully 
expected to get them. But he didn't. There weren't 
bonds enough to go around in wholesale lots. They were 
all distributed in job lots. 

* * * 

George Gould has taken Mrs. Gould (nee Edith Kingden) 
off to Paris, where they will be presented in aristocratic 
circles under the patronage of brother-in-law Castellane, 
the Count. They say that the son of Jay takes kindly to 
such introductions, and aspires some day to meet the 
Prince of Wales. Meanwhile rapid transit elevated roads 
are at a standstill in New York. 

* * * 

What has become of newly-commissioned Dick Savage, 
Major of the Engineers ? A careful inspection of the 
dead, wounded, and missing at Santiago, fails to account 
for him. Is he on service elsewhere? Unless he turns up 
soon the war will be over, and no new laurels accrue to 

the Savage family. 

* * * 

Mrs. James Brown Potter is another kicker in the traces 
the same as Mrs. Lillian Russell Perugini Chatterton. Mr. 
Potter wants to be freed from the bonds of matrimony, 
but Mrs. Potter won't have it. And when a woman won't 
she generally has her own sweet way. 

* * * 

Mr. James R. Keene was measurably gratified when he 
received a cable that his racer St. Cloud II. had won the 
Dillingham plate over in Merrie England, where racing is 
the sport of millionaires and thoroughbreds. He expects 
to add more "plates" to his already well-assorted supply 
of racing bric-a-brac. 

* # * 

James B. Haggin has renewed his youth at Narragan- 
sett, and among pastimes he has taken up with a vim is 
golf. He is on the ground early and late, and bids fair 
to be a champion before the season is much advanced. 



At the Hoffman — Mr. Meyerfield Jr. and T. W. Brooks; 
Waldorf Astoria — Mr. and Mrs. Adolph Roos; Astor — W. 
H. Cameron and C. Hadenfelt; Marlborough — Mr. and 
Mrs. J. B. Parker; Bartholdi — Edward L. Allen; Man- 
hattan — Charles H. McCartney ; Imperial— C. J. Heg- 
gerty; Albert — George J. Campbell. 
# * * 

After having entered his racer, "Murillo," in contests 
every other day since the racing season commenced, Mr. 
Jack Follansbee was delighted on Thursday last to «ee him 
come in a winner. A good part of the purse was blown in 
on a dinner at Manhattan Beach after the race. Jack was 
warmly congratulated. It's an awfully long lane that has 
no turn. Entre Nous. 




jxture 

I Smokinq Tobacco ## 



THE WELLESLEY, 

t» 1433 California Street. 

The Most Attractive Family Hotel in San Francisco. 
Enti-ely New in Every Feature. 



Mbs. Merry. Proprietor. 



Hotel Bella Vista 

1001 Pin* 8teiet 
A First-class Hotel 



The Bella Vista is the Pioneer 
First-class Family Hotel of 
San Francisco. All the com- 
forts of a modern residence. 

MRS. A. P. TRACY 



New York. 



Madison Square, Broadway and 23d 
Street. 



Under new management. Rooms single or 
en suite. Restaurant unsurpassed. Ele- 
gant In all appointments at moderate 
prices. 

Reed & Roblee, ProDS. 
EUROPEAN PL.AN. 



HOTEL 
BARTHOLDI 

New York 



Occidental Hotel. 

A quiet home, centrally located, for 
those who appreciate comfort and 
attention. 



Win. B. flooper, Manager. 



San Francisco 



RiQQS House, 



WASHINGTON, D. C. 



THE HOTEL PAR EXCELLENCE" 

of the National Capital, First class in all 

appointments. 

An illustrated guide to Washington will be 

mailed free of charge, upon receipt of two 

2-ceot stamps. 

0. G. STAPLES, Prop. 



July 23, 1898. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS T.KTTER. 



1 1 1 1 m 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 m n 1 1 1 1 1 1 



MOME DECORATION- 



IIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIlllDUIIIllllllt 

COLOR plays an important part in the making of anti- 
que oriental rugs and the uses to which they are put. 
Green and crimson carry a symbolism of life and power; 
blue and gold, lnve and glory; yellow, royalty. The linn 
symbolizes the sun; the phoenix, death; while white indi- 
cates immortality. Flowers 
represent a language; and 
geometric designs, hidden 
meaning. 

The natural hue of camel's 
hair is much admired, and, 
ov. iug to the fact that it con- 
tains no dye whatever, is 
susceptible of a beautiful 
gloss, growing more silvery 
year by year. 

Under the comprehensive 
title of Antiques are included 
old pieces from Central Asia, 
Daghestan, Sennah, Shiraz, 




Persia, from the Caucasus, 

Khurdistan, Herat, Kirman, Samarcand,' Bokhara, Khiva! 
Yarkand and other places. Of these, in times past and 
present, the Persians have stood in an unchallenged first 
place as the best rug makers of the world. So great is 
their patience, and so infinite their 
varieties, many entire rugs and car- 
pets being made up of tiny designs, 
wherein a small space contains as 
many as 300 knots, introducing sev- 
eral colors, and each inch is a diminu- 
tive picture, repeated over and over 
again upon the rug with unfailing in- 
tegrity, and actual count of stitches, 
for accuracy. 

Antique Persians are extremely 
silky, owing to the fact that they are 
usually made from goat or camel's 
hair, and since it was a frequent cus- 
tom to preserve dates, records, 
prayers or annals by signs and sym- 
bols woven in the rug, the workman- 
ship is of the finest quality. 

Bokharas are woven all in reds of a 
peculiarly soft, bright dye, their value 
gauged by their shadings, ranging 
from magenta to deep maroon. In 
design they are set and geometrical, 
and in appearance wonderfully silky 
and glistening. 

Then there are what K known as 
the blue Bokharas, which introduce a 
blue with the red. The blue is a 
peculiar shade, always the same. Old 
pieces in this style are rare and very 
fine. 

The Khivas are of the same family 
as the blue Bokharas. They intro- 
duce a blue with the red and the old 
ones are very desirable. 

Anatolians are well liked for the 
high silk sheen which is given them by 
long wear. They are made in the 
picturesque vale, the same wherein 
the inhabitants are now so cruelly 
persecuted by the Kurds. Anatolians 
are frequently prayer rugs, and intro- 
duce a peculiar green or orange hue, 
much prized by art lovers. 



When surveying the bewildering 
variety and enormous quantity of 
cushions, considered just at present 
as necessary for comfort on a single 
couch, it is amusing to recall the days 
when one cushion to a sofa was deemed 
an ample allowance. We can even 
remember a time when very partic- 



ular housekeepers had that one made with a stout iron 
wire around the edge so that it would keep its shape under 
all circumstances; not, however, that the beads and Berlin 
work which were the usual decoration offered any tempta- 
tion to frequent use. Sofa pillows nowadays are not made 
to look at. They are of all sizes, covered with all kinds of 
material; they are embroidered or not, are frilled and un- 
frilled according to the fancy of the owner; but one and all 
are intended for ease and comfort. There should always be 
one or two large ones filled with feathers or hair which 
will offer a decided resistance to pressure, as well as the 
fluffy light down ones, which answer admirably for the 
superstructure, but are too unsubstantial for the founda- 
tion of the luxurious nest one builds up on the corner of 
the divan. 

The coverings present an opportunity for most artistic 
blendings of the different shades and tones of the color 
scheme of the room. Two or three should be of plain 
material of the darkest shade employed in the other fur- 
nishings, to give relief to the eye; and no color, however 
lovely in itself, should be used which does not harmonize 
with everything else in the room. 
* * * 

Folding screens should always be of the same wood as 
the other furniture of the bedrooms; where there are no 
mantels, a corner shelf will be found very convenient. 

When the furniture is of native wood the floor is often of 
the same, laid in narrow boards. In mountain cottages 
this can frequently be done without much extra expense. 



i 




Some-how the brilliancy of the cut glass and 
bric-a-brac is dimmed after the washing. It's the 
fault of the soap, most of which contains rosin 
and alkali. Ivory Soap contains neither ; makes 
foamy suds. Rinse thoroughly with clean water 
and the glass will sparkle with a new brilliancy. 



A WORD OF WARNING.— There are many white soaps, each represented to be "just 
as Rood as the 'Ivory';" they ARE NOT, but like ail counterfeits, lack the peculiar and 
remarkable qualities of the genuine. Ask for ' ' Ivory " Soap and insist upon getting it 

Copyright, 1898, br The Procter & Gamble Co., Cincinnati- 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 23, 1898. 




Reif/Ei// 



Minino Editor News Letter: — Re- 
A Sample of verting again to this affair of the Gar- 
Mine Promotion, den Valley Mine, commenting on Lon- 
ergan's ore reserves, you say: "The 
Lonergan report in evidence speaks for itself, and the im- 
prints it bears would suggest considerable caution to the 
reader versed in mining. They certainly would not accept 
it as a final test of the value of the property. It is a little 
too slick." While we now fully realize how very, very 
slick the report is, and how slippery Lonergan himself is, 
there are reasons which amply justify the Directors in the 
course pursued by them. These are: (a) The report is 
suffered to have been approved by the firm of T. W. Smith 
& Co., Mining Experts and Consulting Metallurgists of Lis 
Angeles, of which Mr. Lonergan himself was a member; 
(b) the report was sworn to by Lonergan in the presence 
of a Notary Public. On the other hand reasonable busi- 
ness precautions were taken by the promoters in Chester 
to ascertain the standing and reputation of Lonergan 
and the firm. However, mining investors are entirely 
at the mercy of these self-styled experts (human sharks) 
when the leading mm of the community are pre- 
pared to vouch for th<m, as has been done in this 
case. Following are Mr. Lonergan's credentials: 

Los Angeles, Cal. t March 25, 1890. 
To Whom It May Concern:— 1 have been well acquainted with 
John J. Lonergan for the past eight years, while be has been living 
in Santa .Barbara and Los Angeles, California. He is a member of 
the farm of William T. Smith & Co., Gold and Silver Assayers and 
Mine Examiners. He is a chemist and has a good standing in bis 
profession and as a man he is an honorable man and is entitled to 
the confidence of any one desiring his services or wishing to do 
business with him. (Signed) J. W. Cai.kiks, 

Past President First National Bank, Santa Barbara, Cal. 

* * * 

Los Angeles, Cal., March 31, 1896. 
To Whom It May Concern :— I take pleasure in stating that I am 
acquainted with the firm of William T. Smith & Co., and that they 
rank among the leading Mining Experts, Assayers and Metallurgists 
of this city. I have had a personal acquaintance with Mr. Lonergan 
for the past seven years and he has always enjoyed the reputation of 
being capable and trustworthy. Yours etc., 

(Signed) F. A. Blake, 
4 and 5 Byron Block, Los Angeles, Cal. 

* * ff 

I, George H. Boncbrake, President of the Lcs Angeles National 
Bank situated and doing business in the city of Los Angeles, County 
of Los Angeles, State of California, hereby certify that I am person- 
ally acquainted with John J. Lonergan, a member of the firm of 
William T. Smith & Co., Assayers, Mining Experts and Metalli r- 
gisrs, doing business in the Cityof Los Angeles, County and State of 
aforesaid, and that bis reputation as an assayer of gold and silver 
and as a mining expert is good; and that bis opinion, acts and de- 
clarations in regard to mines and mining I regard as reliable and 
trustworthy. (Signed) Geo. H. Bonebk a 

Dated, March 31, 1896. President of Los Angeles National Bank. 

* * * 

British Vice Consulate, Wilmington and Los Angeles. <>il. 
Temple Block, Los Angeles, Cal. 
To all to whom these presents shall come 1, Charles Wbite 
Mortimer, British Vice Consul at Wilmington and Los Angeles in 
the Slate of California, do hereby certify that George H. Bonebrake 
is the President of the Los Angeles National Bank of Los Angeles, 
California, that J. W. Calkins was formerly President of the First 
National Bank of Santa Barbara, that F. A. Blake is an Englishman 
for many years a resident in Santa Barbara and Los Angeles and 
that the signatures "Geo. H. Bonebrake," "J. W. Calkins" and 
"F. A. Blake," are the signatures of the said parties. 

In testimony I have here unto set my hand and fea I of office at 
the said City of Los Angeles this second day of April A. D. 1 

(Signed) C. White Mortimer, Vice Consul. 

Now, Mr. Editor, these testimonials, like Lonergan's 
report, speak for themselves; without them, undoubtedly, 
his report would not. have been considered by the Chester 
people, and consequently the infamous scheme to swindle 
the English investors would have failed. Of course, we 



quite understand that Mr. Lonergan was a mere tool in 
the hands of others, engaged, on a contingent fee, to per- 
form the necessary dirty work. Prior to its purchase by 
this company the mine was bonded to Judge Morrison of 
Los Angeles by N. D. Burlingham, now doing business in 
Los Angeles as a mining expert, mine promotor and jobber. 
As I am by no means finished yet, and fearing that I 
am already encroaching upon your valuable space, I have 
to ask your indulgence in future issues, and trusting that 
you may find it convenient to give publicity to the foregoing, 

Yours faithfully, Edward Ashton. 

Garden Valley, El Dorado County, July IS, 189S. 

The mining fraternity on Pine street has 
Brokers at found a way at last to circumvent in a 
Work Again, measure the ruinous system of taxation 
resulting from a misinterpretation of the 
law. The market will be in shape for business again 
within a few days, relieviug a condition of dullness which 
has borne heavily on clients as well as brokers. On the 
lode several of the mines are now looking very well.. 
Sierra Nevada at the north end is in a position to prose- 
cute the development of ore known to exist in the mine, 
while the stock is cheap, even if judged by the amount of 
cash reserves in the company's treasury. At the south 
end Justice continues to loom up in fine shape, and no 
more promising prospect has ever been shown up on the 
lode for many a day. The effort being made to pump out 
the lower levels may prove successful, and if it does, new 
life will be given to the business. Before starting up any 
work of this importance, however, the question of miners' 
wages should be settled. The rate on the lode is too high 
altogether to suit people here, who pay the bills, and 
shareholders are inclined to force the hands of the 
directors of the companies interested, who are blamed for 
over leniency in the past. The disposition of the men 
represented by a union is altogether un-American, and if 
for no other reason, it will be just as well to find out who 
is the master, and whether or not the people who foot the 
bills have anything to say about what shall be done with 
their property. 

The Consolidated Gold Mines of Cali- 
Another High- fornia, Limited, is the name of a new in- 
Flying Kite. corporation which has just appeared in 

London, with a capital of £250,000 sterl- 
ing. We have had several inquiries regarding this com- 
pany from different quarters, which on its face seems 
rather a high-flyer. There are only one or two properties 
in this State which will stand a capitalization of §1,260,000, 
so it will be just as well to go slow on the proposition 
until the location of the company's operations is known, 
when values can be more clearly determined. 

The return of miners from the Yukon 

Another Boom for region with more or less gold affords 

the Klondike. another opportunity for schemers of 

all kinds to boom the country. Irre- 
sponsible statements of all kinds are rushed into print, 
and as high as $40,000,000 is named as the value of the gold 
ready for shipment, said to be piled up high enough to 
build a Morro Castle. Divide this by four, and the prob- 
able yield of the new fields will be reached. Reliable infor- 
mation has been received to this effect, and also that the 
run of water is short this year, which will check the out- 
put considerably from the good mines, which are not 
legion. This may not altogether suit the ideas of the 
Dervishes of the Yearning Sack eager for the plunder of 
tenderfeet, nor the promotors of wild-cat companies, but 
their misfortunes will not give the outside world much to 
worry over. In the meantime, there is no particular en- 
thusiasm to be Doted over the northern bonanzas, and the 
transportation companies are not pressed to provide space 
for either freight or passengers. The majority of people 
are evidently not so eager to rush into a wild, God-for- 
saken country, gold or no gold, and the hungry horde 
ready to gamble their very souls for a dollar is now well- 
thinned down. This is a satisfactory sign that common 
sense is not lacking among the masses when it comes to 
sizing up a proposition like the Klondike with its thousand 
and one traps set for travelers baited with the illusive 
gold. 



July 23. 1898. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




•' Hearths Crlor!" "Whst '.hsdSTllart thou?" 
"Onsthat will plar thsds<-ii. sir. with you." 

THE torpedo boat Farragut was launched last Satur- 
day night, and as General Merriam and Admiral 
Miller were going out to witness the launching Merriam 
said to Miller: " Don't you think General that Farragut's 
famous words ought to be repeated by Miss Ashe when she 
christens the vessel?" "I do most certainly," said the 
Admiral, whose rheumatism and other aches and pains had 
left him for a few hours. "I do most certainly." A little 
lieutenant who belongs to the navy heard the conversation 
and pondered deeply. He knew who Farragut was. But 
what did Farragut say? So he approached a man and 
confidentially asked him. "Oh nothing, nothing much," 

replied the other, airily. "Farragut only said 'God 

the torpedoes. Go to" .'" "My gracious," said the 

naval chap, "is she going to say that?" "I guess so. It's 
historical, you know." "Well, well, but history isn't al- 
ways repeatable." The lieutenant listened and assuredly 
as Miss Ashe swung the bottle to the side of the vessel and 
smashed it, she mumbled something. "Did not you hear 
her?" asked the man of the lieutenant. "Yes. Well if 
this don't even beat Honolulu," was all he answered. 

iyi R- SCOVELL, a correspondent attached to the Yellow 
I 1 World, is said to have slapped General Shafter's 
face because he was not allowed to take part in the cere- 
mony of hoisting the Stars and Stripes at Santiago. There 
never was a man nicer to newspapermen than General 
Shafter. The average army officer is inclined to be 
brusque, but General Shafter went out of his way to be 
polite, and understood that when a man was sent to ask 
him questions he did not come of his own volition. The 
act of this correspondent shows exactly the metier of the 
man that fellow Hearst likes to surround himself with. 
The moral atmosphere of the foul sheet here was so vile 
that Ned Hamilton had to leave — and he was the only 
person connected with that paper who was a gentleman 
and who had brains. General Shafter had a perfect right 
to have had that man spitted cm the end of a bayonet — 
spitted as he would spit a reptile or a Hearst. 

MR. GRADY of Fresno is going to put 
a show on the road. Mr. Grady is 
tired of being fined by the courts for con- 
tempt, tired of raising grapes to be con- 
verted into raisins, tired of raising grain 
to be blasted by a dry north wind, so he 
is going to have a traveling show. Heaven 
help the^joor country people who do not 
patronize it. Mr. Grady's temper is such 
that he might feel inclined to make a kill- 
ing in one way if not another, by the use 
of his teeth or empty beer glasses. Then 
the show is really to be a good one. Mr. 
Grady is only traveling with artists. 
Each artist is a soloist, also a tent pitcher, 
a driver, a singer, a dancer, and above 
all, a scrapper. There is no salary at- 
tached to this 1 position. The soloist makes 
'it as he goes- along. He is also a stock 
holder in the show. 

\U. H. H. HART, late of the Board of 
Health, is yet in town. The doctor 
was one of the partners in the famous 
vessel called "The City of Dawson," which is yet 
tied up to a wharf, owing to there being a few bills out 
against the owners. This is Dr. Hart's misfortune, but 
there are several employees of the Board of Health who 
would like to know that as Dr. Hart is not going to the 
Klondike, or has not gone, whether he will be good enough 
to return that $3 that was collected from each man work- 
ing for the Board to buy him flour, bacon, beans, and some 
canned goods. It is to be hoped the doctor will take the 
hint. 




D' 




THERE wore some disgraceful 
ea at the Pacific-street 

wharf on the sailing of the Pennsyl- 
vania. There was a great deal of 

drunkenness, and the odicers of the 

Montana regiment had to call the aid 

of the police to keep their inebriated 

soldiers in order. There were women 

of the lowest class on the dock, and 

their behavior was disgraceful in the 
extreme ; and yet, girls of families 
who call themselves "nice," spent the 
entire day on the wrarf with officers of the regiment, 
Comment is needless. There is neither sense nor decency 
in such behavior — and the only wonder is what the mothers 
of these girls can be thinking of to permit their daughters 
to spend a whole day amid such surroundings. 

LOW women displayed on their arms the badge of the 
Red Cross, and fought for entrance at the gate. They 
swept down the wharf, a yelling, shrieking, demoniacal 
swarm. They threw themselves upon the soldiers and 
lavished caresses upon them in a lewd, abandoned way — 
never did San Francisco present a more disgusting spec- 
tacle ! Drunken soldiers, dissolute characters I They 
were lost to all sense of shame. It was a saturnalia — a 
saturnalia from which well-bred girls should have kept 
away. But when a well-bred girl can be so enraptured 
as to be indifferent to such scenes, there must be some ex- 
cuse made for the miserable jade who has been loitering 
around Camp Merritt and who follows her "friend " to the 
vessel. 

THE chaplain of the Montana regiment, Heaven only 
knows his name, no one on earth ever wants to. has 
not that Christian spirit which prompts him to turn the 
other cheek when the one is smitten. Mr. Chaplain was 
a pompous little man, well rounded, smug, and well favored'. 
His breath was reminiscent of garlic and steam beer, and 
his dress was an alpaca coat and a frayed pair of shape- 
less trowsers. He did not look a chaplain but a runner 
for a dive. There was a naughty man in the Montana 
regiment who drew a knife and offered to carve out the 
vitals of anybody or everybody— particularly his Lieuten- 
ant. The belligerant was promptly clubbed insensible by 
a sergeant and then conveyed into a private office on the 
wharf to recuperate. The chaplain rushed to the scene 
and demanded admittance. He was denied entrance by 
Captain Dunleavy, and as he attempted to open the door 
was properly thrust back. He did not dress like a clergy- 
man and did not act like a clergyman. It is such grace- 
less characters as this creature that cast shame up;n a 
noble cause. Such men were better engaged in breaking 
rock on the public highways than bestowing spiritual con- 
solation upon the unpenitent soldiers. 

DR. DEAS, widely known for his works of charity, says 
he was once compelled to rob a Chinaman. He could 
not help it, says Deas. He had to do it to protect him? 
self, He was at the Harbor Hospital when fa catie'a 
Chinaman and wanted a ticket to Vallejo on "J^ boat" that 
plies there regularly. "Go to the office, '*■ said Deas, 
"No foolee me; give me ticket." "This no office; go 
there," pointing to the office. "Oh, you no foolee me; 
give me ticket. " "No office," roared Deas. "You heap 
lie. Give me this ticket," said the Chinaman, as he took 
up a time card. "All right," said Deas, with resignation, 
"Sell you that one dollar." "Al-lite," replied the Chinar 
man, as he planked down the dollar. "Why you foollee 
me so long?" There was a peculiarly exasperated high'i 
binder around the hospital fifteen minutes afterward; but 
Dr. Deas was away drinking the Chinaman's health with 
some friends. 

S CERTAIN Sir Thomas Lipton is in the United States, 
Whether he is a knight or a baronet is not .exactly 
known, but he has a title, and some "sirs" are. quite an-, 
cient. Thrifty King James sold them, and raised quite a 
revenue therefrom," though he never went to war with 
Spain. Sir Thomas is a tea merchant and raised his title 
through tea. He may possibly come to San Francisco. 
What a chance I He is wealthy and single. Lady Thomas 
does not sound badly after all— at least oneCaliforniaa&ir>} 
did not think so. 



H 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 23, 1898. 



BANKING. 



Bank of British Columbia. { ?»Zr^Xw s cZl™i!m. 

Capital Paid Up 13,000,000 Reserve Fund • 500,000 

HEAD OFFICE. 60 LOMBARD STREET, LONDON 

BRAWCHts— Victoria, Vancouver, New Westminster, K am loo pa, Nan- 
lamo. Nelson, Sandon, and Kaslo, British Columbia; Portland, Oregon. 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Aooounts opened sub- 
ject to Check, and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted 
available in all parts of the world. Approved Bills discounted and ad- 
vances made on good collateral security. Draws direot at current rates 
upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon itB Agents, as follows : 

New York— Merchants' Bank of Canada ; Chicago— First Na tional Bank ; 
Liverpool— North and South "Wales Bank; Scotland— British Linen 
Company; Ireland— Bank of "Ireland; Mexico— London Bank of Mexico; 
Sodth America— London Bank of Mexico and South America; Cbina and 
Japan— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China; Australia and 
New Zealand— Bank of Australasia and Commercial Banking Company 01 
Sydney, Ld ; Demerara and Trinidad (West Indies)— Colonial Bank. 

Also on Dawson City, Yukon District, arrangements having been made 
with the Canadian Bank of Commeroe whereby it is prepared to issue 
drafts and Letters of Credit on that Bank at above point, and transact 
other banking business. Terms upon application. 

San Francisco Savings Union. 

532 California Street. 

Deposits, Julyl, 1898 123,356,130 Reserve Fund $182,009 

Pald-Up Capital 1,000,000 Contingent Fund 436,516 

E B. POND, President W. C. B. DeFREMERY, Vice-President 

LOVELL WHITE, Cashier. 

Directors: George W Beaver, Thom»s Magee, W. C. B de Fremery, Al- 
bert Miller, Robert Watt, George C. Boardman, Daniel E. Martin, George 
Tashetra, E. B. Pond. 

Loans upon San Francisco and Oakland Real Estate, and Farms and 
Farming Lands in the Country. 

Receives Deposits. Country remittances may be made In checks payable 
in San Francis 10, Post Office or Wells Fargo & Co.'s Money Orders, or coin 
by Express, but the responsibility of this bank oommences only with the 
receipt cl the money. 

No charge is made for pass book or entrance fee. 

Office Hours : 9 a. m. to 3 p. m , and Saturday evenings, for receipt of de- 
posits only, 6:30 to 8 o'clock. 

Bank of California, San FranGisco. 

Capital and Surplus, 16,000.000 

WILLIAM ALVORD President 1 CHARLES R. BISHOP. .Vice-Pres't 

ALLEN M. CLAY Secretary THOMAS BROWN Cashier 

S. Prentiss Smith... Ass't Cashier 1 1. F. moolton 2d Ass't Cashier 

CORRESPONDENTS. 
Niw York— Messrs. Laldlaw & Co.; the Bank of New York, N.B. A. 
Baltimore— The National Exchange Bank. Boston— The Tremont Na- 
tional Bank; Chicago— Illinois Trust and Savings Bank; Union National 
Bank. Philadelphia— Philadelphia National Bank. St. Louis— Boat- 
man's Bank. Virginia Citt (Nev.)— Agency of The Bank of California. 
London— Messrs. N. M.Rothschild & Sons; Paris — Messrs. de Roths- 
child Freres Berlin— Direction der Dlsconto Gesellschaft. China, 
Japan and East Indies — Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China. 
Australia and New Zealand— The Union Bank of Australia, Ltd., and 
Bank of New Zealand. 
Letters of Credit Issued available In all parts of the world. 

The San Francisco National Bank, 

Southeast Corner of Pine and Sansome streets, S. F. 
Jas. K. Wilson, President. E- A. Brugdiere, Vice-President. 

Lewis I. Oowgill, Cashier. F. W. Wolfe, Assistant Cashier. 

Capital $500,000 

Directors: Jas. K. Wilson, D. J. Staples, Wm. Pierce Johnson, Geo. 
A.Pope, E. A. Bruguiere, Ed. G. Lukens, Charles C. Judson. 

Agents: New York— Hanover National Bank, Chase National Bank; 
Boston— National Bank of the Commonwealth. Philadelphia— Drexel & 
Co. Chicago — Continental National Bank. St. Louis— The Mechanics' 
Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. London— Brown Shipley & 
Co. Paris— Morgan, Harjes & Co. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 

33 Post Strut, below Kearnt, Mechanics' institute Building. 

Guaranteed Capital 11,000,000 Pald-Up Capital 1300,000 

JAMES D. PHELAN. President. S. G. MURPHY, Vice-President. 
GEO. A. STORY, Cashier. JOHN A. HOOPER, Vice-President. 

C. B. HOBSON, Assistant Casbler. 

Dirictobs— James D. Phelan, L. P. Drexler, John A. Hooper, C. G. 
Hooker, James Moffltt, S. G. Murphy, Frank J. Sullivan, Robert McElroy, 
and JoBepb D. Grant. 

Interest paid on Deposits. Loans on approved securities. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order, Wells, Fargo & Co. , or Exchange 
onCity Banks. Whenopenlng acoountssend slgnatuie. 

SWiSS AmeriGan Bank °' LOCARNO, Switzerland, and 

Germania Trust Go. of San Frantisco s?re"°, n s f T erj 

Paid-up Capital and Reserves, $020,000. 
(G. T. Co. $320,000) (S. A. B. $300,000) 
A general savings and commercial banking business transacted. Inter- 
est paid on savings deposits. Loans on approved real estate security and 
on commercial paper. 

DIRECTORS— Ernst A. Denlcke, A. Sbarboro. J. C. Rued, E. Martlnonl 
P. C. Slebe. A. Tognazxini, H Brunner, McD R. Venable, A. G. Wleland 
P. Krone nberg, Charles Martin, C Jehret, P. Tognazzlni, S. Grandi, 

Grocker-Woolworth National Bank of S. F. 

Corker Market, Montgomery, 

and Post Streets. 

Pald-Up Capital 11,000,000 

WM. H.CROCKER _ President 

W. E. BROWN Vice-President 

GEO. W.KLINE Casbler 

Directors— Henry T, Scou, E. B. Pond. Hy. J. Crocker, Geo. W. Scott 



THE CO-RESPONDENT. 



STDYVESANTE Van Keuren twirled his iron-gray 
mustache reflectively, and crossed and recrossed his 
little bow legs undecidedly. 

It was the end of the season, and the fascinating Mrs. 
Delmayn Hungerfurd still remained an enigma to this 
astute man of the world. 

True, their acquaintance had been of short duration, a 
fleeting summer on the sands of Duneleigh; but then, the 
cementing qualities of salt water had worked wonders, and 
the democracy of beach life had engendered a friendship 
that the stern conventionality of town would have frowned 
upon. 

Stuyvesante had reached that period of life when the 
art of living becomes a science, not alone from the gour- 
met's point of view, but that of the possessor of three 
score years, who has to study hygiene and take extra pre- 
cautions to ensure the working of that inactive agent to 
perfect health — the liver. 

If Stuyvesante hadn't spent half of his life in the saddle 
his legs would have been worthy of the Apollo Belvedere; 
as it was, or rather as they were bowed, he gave the im- 
pression in the golf field of always walking backward. 

There are three kinds of love — puppy love, dog love, and 
an old man's ardent admiration for a young and beautiful 
woman. Of the three the last-named is the least danger- 
ous. At least, so Stuyvesante thought. 

As a man grows older and recognizes the physical dis- 
parity between younger men and himself and sees the bal- 
ance in favor of youth, his vanity increases in proportion 
when he is singled out for a young and pretty woman's 
favors. Naturally, Stuyvesante was greatly pleased and 
flattered that Mrs. Hungerfurd should prefer his society 
and devote her time to him when such a man as young 
Jerrold Jones was around. 

From Mrs. Hungerfurd's sweet lips Stuyvesante had 
heard the sad story of Hungerfurd's cruelty and neglect, 
how life with him had become simply unendurable. 

Hungerfurd was on the other side. 

He could well understand the woman's story and sym- 
pathize with her. 

It was now the end of the; season, and events that had 
transpired the previous twenty-four hours caused Stuyve- 
sante to continue to twirl his mustache and cross and re- 
cross his bow legs agitatedly. 

The day before Jones had invited him and Mrs. Hunger- 
furd to go sailing on the bay in Jones's 
small cabin catboat. 

It had been a day of unalloyed pleas- 
ure, wind and weather had been per- 
fect, the luncheon dainty and judiciously 
" wet," and Jones's seamanship such as 
to occasion no alarm. 

The moon rose about niue that even- 
ing, and it had been decided to return 
by its light. Ten o'clock found them 
five miles from Duneleigh, bowling along 
before a five-knot breeze. Thump I and 
Jones's little craft had burried her nose 
three feet deep in a sand bar. The two 
men had worked heroically for hours in 
a vain effort to push the boat off. 

Finally it was decided that one of the 
two must swim for land, a half-mile 
away, and bring back a row-boat, by 
which the party would be able to reach 
the shore. 

Stuyvesante had volunteered to do 
the swimming, but Mrs. Hungerfurd 
had strenuously objected, insisting that 
Jones should make the attempt and 
Stuyvesante stay with her aboard the 
sailboat. 

Good swimmer that he was, Jones 
had become exhausted, and only man- 
aged to reach land with difficulty, 
swooning when he reached the beach 
and not regaining consciousness until 
broad daylight. 





SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



»5 




>^— The plight of the two aboard the 

\||. boat may be better imagined than de- 

Jn JL^ scribed. 

After several attacks of "nerves" 
Mrs. Hungerfurd had suffered herself 
to be calmed by Stuyvesante, the moon 
at last shining lovingly upon two shad- 
owy forms enveloped in a steamer rug 
and curled up in the stern of the boat. 
Stuyvesante's old heart woke with a 
bound, the words he poured into Mrs. 
Hungerfurd's not unwilling ear were 
words of fire: "The greatest truth and 
the greatest treason are uttered in the 
words "'I love you,' " he whispered. 
" I love you, I love you ! " he repeated, 
and dawn found him still repeating the 
words. 

With daybreak came a full realiza- 
tion of their position — Mrs. Hunger- 
furd distressed beyond measure, Stuy- 
vesante, poor old boy, vowing that he 
would have Jones's blood for leaving a lady in such a 
dreadful predicament. To think of having so basely com- 
promised a woman made Stuyvesante fairly boil with rage 
and indignation. 

When at length Jones made his appearance with some 
fishermen and succeeded in pulling the boat off, Mrs. Hun- 
gerfurd's plans had been made — she would leave Duneleigh 
that morning on the noon train. 

So Stuyvesante sat on the veranda of the little inn sor- 
rowfully waiting to bid her adieu. 

That she loved him was beyond the peradventure of a 
doubt; that had been demonstrated aboard the sailboat 
the night previous when she had implored him not to risk 
his life and insisted that Jones should brave the perils of 
the long swim. But why this sudden departure ? 

He could not understand the woman's wild desire to 
leave— oh, yes, he could; his mad avowal of passion had 
been too precipitate; he had frightened her. Alas ! he 
had not understood this complex bit of femininity. She 
who had looked upon him as mentor and friend had not ex- 
pected to find a passionate lover. Stuyvesante, the cau- 
tious, the circumspect, had lost head with heart. 

For the first time in his life he had committed the great- 
est wrong a gentleman could offer a woman — he had com- 
promised her, and reparation was out of the question. 
"Mrs. Hungerfurd — Belle 1 " 

She stood in the doorway, clad in a dark gray tailor- 
made traveling costume, a large gray Fedora shading her 
violet-blue eyes. 
Never had he seen her look more beautiful. 
He had risen and seized her gloved hand. 
"It seems to be the end of the season," he said, with a 
sigh, "a — er — rather an abrupt ending. Is there nothing 
I can do or say to alter your determination to leave to- 
day ? " 

" I have much that I want to say to you, since you have 
forbidden me to write. 

"We have been such good friends; you have led me to 
believe that you consider me worthy of all confidence. May 
I hope for a renewal of your esteem — even after the un- 
fortunate occurrence of last night ? " 

"Mr. VanKeuren," she replied, "a woman's reputation 
is a precious thing, but even higher do I prize her caste, 
her status. I came down here this summer with the full 
knowledge that every act on my part would be commented 
on, that espionage would be practiced on me. 

" John Hungerfurd is not the man to leave a stone un- 
turned when once his insanely jealous suspicions are 
aroused. 

"As he has tired of me he seeks to free himself of me. 
" I thought with you for a friend I shoi Id be secure from 
any faux pas; that you would be able to guard me against 

the faintest breath of slander " 

"And that is why you kept me with you last night, know- 
ing me to be a man of honor, knowing " 

"It was no sentiment on my part," she continued, 
coldly. "As I prize my position in life, so do I value my 
associates." 

' ' What do you mean ? ' 
edly. 



"The moment the boat grounded and I realized the im- 
possibility of getting her off, and the question of swimming 
ashore for aid arose, I accepted the inevitable and mode 
my itioice of " she paused. 

"Of what?" demanded Van Keuren. 

"Of co-respondents," replied Mrs. Hungerfurd. "My 
pride is such I could never have the plebeian name of Jones 
connected with mine in divorce proceedings." 

Stuyvesante Van Keuren's little bow Tegs gave way. 
He staggered back a few paces. " Do you mean to say," 
he gasped, " that you have only valued me for my name 
and family, for the distinction that exists between the 
name of Jones and Stuyvesante Van Keuren — that if Jones 
had been a Van Keuren I would have had to do the swim- 
ming ? " 

" Precisely," she replied. " Stuyvesante Van Keuren 
is a better name." 

The carriage drove up to take her to the station. 

It was the end of the season for Stuyvesante Van Keu- 
ren.— The Story Teller. 

John W. Cirmany ia making a special sale for a few days of 
fine gentlemen's furnishing goods, 25 Kearny street. 



Jackson's Napa Soda water cares dyspepsia. 

BANKING. 
The flnglo-Galifornian Bank, Limited. 

Capital authorized 18,000,000 

Subscribed 8,000,000 

Paid Up 1,600,000 

Reserve Fund 700,000 

N. B. Cob. Pine and Sansome Sis 
Head Office— 18 Austin Friars, London, E. O. 

Agents at New York— J. & W. Seligman & Co., 21 Broad street. 
The Bank transacts a General Banking Business, sells drafts, makes 
telegraphic transfers, and issues letters of credit available throughout the 
world. Sends bill* for collection, loans money, buys and sells exohange 
and bullion. IGN. STfirNHART I «.„,.„„ 
P. N. LILIENTHAL f "">»»»» 

The German Savings and Loan Society. 

No. 526 California Stbeet, San Franolsco 
Guarantee capital and surplus — $2,109,000 99 
Capital actually paid up In cash.. 1,000.000 00 

Deposits December 31, 1897 26,309,633 36 

OFFICERS: President, B. A. Becker; First Vice-President, Daniel 
Meyer; Seoond Vice-President, H. Horstman; Cashier, A. H. R. Sohmldt; 
Assistant Cashier, William Herrmann; Secretary, George Tourny; Assist- 
ant Secretary, A. H. Muller; Attorney, W. S. Goodfellow. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS: B. A. Becker, Daniel Meyer. H Horst- 
mann, Ign. Stelnhart, N. Van Bergen, E. Route, E. B. Russ, D. N. 
Walter and N. Ohlandt. 



Wells Fargo & Go. Bank. 



N. E. Corner Sansomb & Sutter Streets 

John J. Valentine President 

Homer S. King Manager 

H. Wadsworth Cashier 

F. L. Llpman Assistant Cashier 

Cash Capital and Surplus — 16,260.000 

BRANCHES. 

N. Y. City, H. B. Parsons, Cashier. | Salt Lake City, J. E. Dooly, Cashier 

Portland, Or., R. M. Dooly, Cashier. 

Directors— John J. Valentine, Benj. P. Cheney, Oliver Eldrtdge, Henry 

E. Huntington, Homer S. King, George E. Gray, John J. MoCook, John 

Bermingham, Dudley Evans. 

London, Paris and American Bank, Limited. 

N.W. COR. SANSOME t Sdtter Sts. 

Subscribed Capital 12,600,000 

Paid Up Capital 12,000,000 

ReserveFund I 860,000 

Head Office 40 Threadneedle Street, London, E.C. 

AGENTS— New York— Agency of the London, Paris, and American 
Bank Limited, No. 10 Wall Street, N. Y. Paris— Messrs. Lazard, Freres 
& Cle, 17 Boulevard Poissoniere. Draw direot on the prinolpal oitles of the 
world. Commercial and Travelers' Credits Issued. 



SIQ. GREENEBATJM 1 M .„. Mr . 
O. ALTSCHUL JManagera. 



SeGuritu Savings Bank. 

222 MONTGOMERY ST.. MILLS BOILDINO. 

INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. 

LOANS MADE. 

DIRECTORS. 
William Alvord S. L. Abbot Jr. 

Wm. Babcook O. D. Baldwin 

Adam Grant W. S. JoneB 



H. H. Hewlett 
E. J. McCutchen 
R. H. Pease 



asked Stuyvesante, perplex- 



Gontinental Building & Loan Association of California. 

Established in 1889. 222 Sansome St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Subscribed Capital, 17,000,000 Profit and Reserve Fund, 1100,000 

Paid-in Capital - - - 1,000,000 Monthly Income, over - - 76,000 

Dr. Ed. E. Hill, President. Oapt. Oliver, Eldridqb, Vice-President. 
Wm. Corbin, Secretary and General Manager. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




July 23. 1898. 



Illustrated. 



Silence and Other Stories, by Mary E. Wilkins. 
Harper At Brothers, New York and London. 
As a writer of admirable short stories Miss Wilkins has 
attained phenomenal popularity, and her latest volume, 
containing a collection of seven tales: "Silence," "The 
Buckley Lady," "Evelina's Garden," "A New England 
Prophet," "The Little Maid at the Door," and "Lydia 
Hersey of East Bridgwater," cannot fail to bring new 
laurels to its writer. Miss Wilkins knows, as few people 
do, the New England character, the New England homes, 
and presents the many phases of New England life to her 
readers with a delicacy of touch, a fidelity of drawing, a 
simple earnest realism that has won for her a host of ad- 
mirers. "Silence," the story which 
gives its title to the volume, recalls 
the Deerfield Massacre, and is a vivid 
Hlumioation of that dark page of New 
England History. "The Buckley 
Lady," quite different in style, intro- 
duces one to the most fascinating of 
creatures, and long will the picture of 
Persis, as Miss Wilkins has so deftly 
painted it, "draw the thoughts of 
people away from their own hearts." 
"Evelina's Garden" is a delight to 
read about, a delight to dwell upon, 
and Evelina herself adds one more 
note to the long gamut of tender, 
touching, loving creations with which 
Miss Wilkins is wont to charm her 
readers. The other stories are 
equally readable, and altogether the 
collection is a most satisfying one, and 
cannot fail to meet with a warm 
welcome. 



life long he was a high-minded Christian gentleman. Mr. 
Bryce concludes his tribute of admiration to his political 
associate and co laborer in the following words: "There 
is a passage in the 'Odyssey,' where the seer Theocly- 
menus, in describing a vision of death, says: 'The sun has 
perished out of Heaven.' To Englishmen, Mr. Gladstone 
has been like a sun which, slowly sinking, has grown larger 
as he san'i, and filled the sky with radiance even while he 
trembled on the verge of the horizon. There were able 
men, and famous men, but there was no one comparable to 
him in power and fame and honor. Now he is gone. The 
piercing eye is dim, and the mellow voice is silent, and the 
light has died out of the sky." 

The Waters of Caney Fork: A Romance of Tennessee, by Opie Read. 
Rand, McNally & Co., publishers, Chicago and New York. 

Of the waters of Caney Fork — so the legend runs — to 
drink once is surely to drink again. Of Mr. Opie Read's 
books it may be said as well that to read one means surely 
to read another; and lovers of fiction will welcome with 
pleasure a new novel from his pen, and one which will not 



NEVER MAS ANYTHING BEEN SO HIGHLY AND SO JUSTLY PRAISED AS 



VIN MARIANI 



Wro. Ewart Gladstone, His Characteristics 
- as Man and Statesman. The Century 
Co., New Y'ork. 

On this side of the Atlantic Mr. 
Bryce is best known perhaps by his 
able work "The American Common- 
wealth," and we can think of no one 
more fitted than this English writer 

•to sketeh for us the Great English 
Statesman who so recently passed out 
of life. Mr. Bryce in the volume just 

.'published by the Century Company 
gives us a most interesting study of 
Mr. Gladstone, tells us of the early 
influences which surrounded him, his 
Scottish blood, his Oxford education, 
his apprenticeship to public life under 
Sir Robert Peel; speaks of him as 
author, parliamentarian and orator 
and attributes to his oratorical gifts 
the rise to power and fame of the great 
Liberal leader. He pictures for us 
the Stately simplicity of Mr. Glad- 
stone's life, the dignity of his nature, 
the originality and independence of 
his character, and touches upon the 
wonderful financial reforms he 
wrought and adds "to describe the 
acts he. carried would almost be to 
write the history of British Legisla- 
tion. 1 " ' The last chapter of this little 
volume is devoted to the religious 
character of one, who from boyhood 
to old age was the loyal son of the 

"English Church. On leaving the Uni- 

"versity he decided to become a clergy. 

■man but hisfather's opposition induced 
him to abandon the idea— and all his 



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July 23. 1898. 



SAN FRANCISCO Nl-WS LETTER. 



iletract from the imputation of its author. 1 
the present romam c is laid in rural T.-m • 
quemed ami pfetureMUC portion of our country. 
people havt a fas< inati-n all their own The story 
by Mitford Hudley. M. D., who, on lea vii giollegcai 
the dea'b of his pareuts, dreading to see his old bora 
into the hands of strangers, turns his f.u <■ toward the ad- 
venturous West, and (or some years practices medicine, but 
without marked success, to Colorado. There comes to him 
there one day a yearning to see bis native hills in Northern 
Tennessee. "Ambition," he tells us, " Buttered out of my 
breast like a tired bird;" and he resolves to return to the 
borne of his youth. He recalls the little brick office at the 
corner of tbe yard, near the highway, where his father. 1 
rural practitioner, had begun life, and where it was his 
wont to sit at night, listening "to the flute of the wind, 
the banjo of tbe rain." To go back there and establish 
himself in that office is his one desire, and disposing of his 
effects he turns towards home. There he comes into pos- 
session of the old place, and rides over the bridle paths 
his father made, with no other ambition than to be a coun- 
try doctor. The other characters of the book are drawn 
with striking individuality — old Luke Radshaw and his 
wife of huge proportions, their son Glich — "his mother 
fished up the name fn m some family millpond" — a youth 
with fox-hunting and horse-racing proclivities, form a 
striking family trio — and not less interesting is old Polly 
Billings, with "one corner of her mouth borne down by the 
constant pressure of a pipe stem." Lady Edwards "with 
the lightness of May in her feet " — but on her mind, alas ! 
"spots that were dark," is a touching character. How, 
through fire and baptism in the waters of Caney Fork, and 
through the heart, her love for Mitford Hudley, her cure 
is effected, it would be scarcely fair to tell here. Other 
people flit across the pages, not to be forgotten, so faith- 
fully portrayed are they in their local color, and so full of 
that human nature which is so diversified and still so like 
in all the corners of the world. To many readers of the 
book quite as much enjoyment may be found in its flashes 
of humor, its happy similes, its poetic touches, its inter- 
pretations of the myriad moods of nature, as in the story 
itself. Whether Mr. Read writes of the sunlight on the 
lawn, mellow and warm, the soft murmur of the air on the 
tops of tbe trees, the summer garden sweet with the scent 
of the rose, the mocking bird high in the moonlight singing 
to his mate, the bed white as a snow-drift and soft as the 
down of a dove, or of the ra'n on the moss-covered roof, 
the faint drip, drip of water into the rain barrel, tbe 
chestnuts dropping in the woods, the underbrush which 
holds the darkness close down to earth, it matters not 
— with him we see, we hear, we feel it all, and with Mit- 
ford Hudley we are tempted to exclaim: "What is life 
without poetry— not the rimes that have been written 
acd altered to restrict or swell an accent, but the subtle 
influence of weather, woods, nature — that move men to 
write verse ? " 



The Missions of California by Laura B. Powers. Wm. Doxey, at 
the Sign of the Lark, San Franc'sco. 

This little book is a hook with a purpose — and a very 
audable one at that — it is a plea — and an earnest one — 
for the preservation and the restoration of the California 
missions. It contains a brief sketch of the first white set- 
tlements and occupation of Alta California, the establish-. 
ment of the first military posts in 1769 under Jose de Gal- 
vez, and the Franciscan expeditionsof the same year, with 
Fathers Crespi and Junipero Serra at their head. A sim- 
ple account is given, enriched by many illustrations of the 
founding, growth and decay of a score or more of missions. 
In 1835 their death-knell was sounded. They were taken 
from the jurisdiction of the priests and were transferred 
to the Government, and of many of these once proud and 
prosperous establishments but a few crumbling ruins re- 
main. A careful study of these landmarks of the early 
history of our State will be of value to old and yoimg alike, 
and the preservation of its picturesque ruins should meet 
with the earnest co-operation of every true Californian. 
Tbe presswork of the book is done in San Francisco, as 
would seem fitting; and that at the printing shop of the 

Jackson's Napa Soda is the finest table water in the world. 



K 1>. Taylor Company it is well clone, goes without gay 
iiie. A word of commendation for the Illustration which 
prefaces the volume: a word alsi of Bret Harte's poem, 
"The Anirelus," which serves as title page. To many of 
us tbese Btaotas, wrHten three decades ago, are familiar, 
bet re-reading them to-day, in the light of present events, 
the two lines : 

" I see the dying glow <>f Spanish gibryi 
The Hun^t'i dream and la 
take on a different and strikingly prophetic meaning. 

I '■ >\l\tl NICATBD 

WHY are our officers the finest in the world ? 
Because they are — Strong as "Sampson," "Schley" 
as a fox, fight with "Merritt," with "Miles" of men. 
What more "Dewey "want? 

THERE is a beautiful, but we hope futile, fidelity to 
the interests of his countrymen in the protest of the 
Chinese Consul here against preventing them from con- 
tracting for the manufacture of clothing for the soldiers; 
but it will be to the everlasting shame of San Francisco if 
a single garment that can be made by the needy and will- 
ing women of this city shall be allowed to get into the 
yellow fingers of the thrifty Mongols. 

SHAKE INTO YOUR SHOES 

Allen's Foot-Ease, a powder for the feet. It cures painful, swol- 
len, smarting, nervous feet, and instantly lakes the sting out of 
corns and bunions. It's the greatest comfort discovery of the 
age. Allen's Foot-Ease makes tight or new shoes feel easy It 
is a certain cure for sweating, callous, and hot, tired, aching 
feet. Try It to-day. Sold by all druggists and shoe stores. By 
mail for 25 cents In stamps. Trial package FREE. Address, 
Allen S. Olmsted, Le Roy, N. Y. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Crown Point Gold and Silver Mining Company. 

Locaiionof principal plnceof business— San Francisco, Cal. Location of 
workH— Gold Hill, Nevada 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors of this 
company, held on the 7(b day oi July, lf-98, an assessment (No. 74) 
of Five cents was levied uoou each and every share of the capital 
stock of said company, payable immediately to the Secretary, at the office 
of the company, room 35. Mills building, third floor San. Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
"WEDNESDAY, the 10th DAY OF AUGUST,- 1898, 
will be deemed delinquent and duly advertised for sale at public auction: 
and unless payment whall be made before, w ill be sold on Wednesday, the 
31st day of August. 1898. lo pay tne delinquent assessment, together with 
costs of advertising and expenses of sale By order of the Board of Dlrec- 
tiis. • JAMES NEWLANDS, Secretary. 

■ Office— Room 35 third floor. Mills building, N. E. oorner Bush and Mont- 
gomery streetB, San Francisco, Cal. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE 
Confidence Silver Mining' Company. 
Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California Loca- 
tion of works— Gold Hill, Storey county. Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
the 21st day of June, 181*8, an assessment {No 30) of 1 1 cents per share, was 
levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable immediately In 
United States gold coin to the Secretary, at the office of the company, 
4t4 California street. San Francisco, C tl 
Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
Ji6th DAY OF JULY, 1898, 
will be delinquent, and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless 
payment is made before will be sold on Tuesday, the 16th day of August, 
1898, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertis- 
ing and. expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors . 

A. S. GROTH, Secretary. 
Office,— No. 414 California street, San Francisco, California. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Loma Prieta Prune Ranch Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, Gal. Location 
ofianoh — Monte ey Cjunty. Cal. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the Thirteenth (13th) day of July, 1898. an assessmen No. 2, of Ten 
Dollars ($10) per share was levied upon the capital stock of the 
corporation, payable immediately in United States gold coin to the Sec- 
retary, at the office of the company, 33 Post str. et, San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 

MONDAY, ihe 16th DAY OF AUGUST, ltWo 
will be delinquent, and advertised for sale at public auotlon. ana unless 
payment is made before will be sold on Thur*day, the 15th day of fcep- 
tember, 189V, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of 
advertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

GEORGE a. STORY, Secretary. 
Office: 33 Post street, San Francisco, Cal. 



JoFOtimid. 



As a table water is unsurpassed. 
— Loudon Hospital Gazette. 



i8 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 23 1898. 




IMPERTURBABILITY is the dominant characteristic 
of GraDt Carpenter, the librettist of "The Poster," and 
he prides himself on never giving way to bis "feelinks." 

Carpenter was sitting in his club the other day, reading 
that fascinating bit of fiction, "Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde." 
For his better enjoyment of it, he elected to read sur- 
rounded by a lively group, so he chose a corner of the card 
room, not even the boisterousness of which interfered with 
his perusal of the story. 

"Come and sit in the game, Carp." urged one of the 
poker players. 

For a time Carpenter was proof against these blandish- 
ments, but he finally yielded reluctantly to the entreaties 
of his friends, laying aside his book at the open page he 
had just been reading. 

When he picked up the first hand dealt him, he was 
quietly gratified at finding three jacks in it. The other 
fellow, however, had three kings, and having played the 
game for precisely ninety-three seconds, and having lost 
just five dollars without having uttered a syllable, Car- 
penter swung silently artfund in his chair, picked up his 
book, and nonchalantly resumed "Dr. Jekyll and Mr. 
Hyde," at the point he had left off two minutes previously. 
# # # 

Lieutenant J. Wallace F. Diss, of the Seventh Regiment 
of California Volunteers, is generally considered by his ac- 
quaintances a fortunate and successful individual. Ten 
years ago he was a San Francisco reporter. Then he mi- 
grated to Redlands where he married the belle of San 
Bernardino County, and, incidentally, a blooming and ex- 
tensive orange grove. He also essayed a mercantile 
venture, in which he was successful, and still lacking 
contentment, was elected County Clerk and Recorder and 
several other stripes of politician vith fat salaries thrown 
in. 

When war was declared, he relinquished all his civic 
honors and commercial revenues to accept a commission 
and wear a uniform, and now he is a warrior, but with all 
his old journalistic instincts still rampant. He is as much 
noted for his love of fun as are the members of his company 
certain that he will be for his bravery, if exposed to fire. 

A certain strapping private in his company is as good a 
soldier as ever munched hardtack, but he has no more 
sense of humor than the barrel of his gun. After the mid- 
day dinner, Lieutenant Diss set him rather a difficult task, 
remarking: 

" If you accomplish that this afternoon, I shall say you 
may become as great a man as General Merritt." 

' Lieutenant," declared the private, very solemnly. 
"I'll do it this afternoon if it takes me till morning!" 

Lieutenant Diss also tells with great unction of another 
of bis recruits who, at the end of the first week in camp, 
succumbed to the novel hardships, and had to be taken to 
the hospital. An orderly who was sent to inquire for his 
invalid comrade, brought back word that the sick man was 
"covered all over with a terrible interruption!" 
* * # 

Ed. Elias, well known in mining circles, has just been 
appointed Assayer of the U. S. Branch Mint of San Fran- 
cisco and thereby hangs a tale of long memory on the part 
of President McKinley, who appointed him. Seventeen 
years ago Elias made a trip to Colorado, having in his 
charge a seven year old nephew, who was to be returned 
to parental care on his arrival at Denver. Mr. and Mrs. 
McKinley were on the same train, returning from a tour 
of California to their Ohio home. 

Elias, being a bachelor at that time, had little experi- 
ence, if any, in handling children, and the boy gave him 
much trouble. Mrs. McKinley seeing how matters stood 
made friends with the youngster and assumed maternal 
care of him during the voyaee. 

This made, as matters go, companions of Elias and Con- 




gressman McKinley and Mrs. McKinley. When the ap- 
pointment of an Assayer to the San Francisco Mint came 
up before the President, he closely scanned the names of 
the numerous applicants for that very desirable position 
and listened to the arguments of each claimant. On ar- 
riving at Mr. Elias' name he asked the eloquent represent- 
ative of that gentleman a few questions and then, he 
quietly said: "I met him once on a Railroad train." 
Next day Ed. Elias was appointed to the place he wanted 
and next month he will take office. 

* * # 

Apropos of the retirement of Mr. J. W. 
Warburton, the British Consul-General, 
after forty vears' diplomatic service, 
rather a good story is going the rounds 
of the clubs regarding a ridiculous case of 
mistaken identity. 

In a little Episcopal Church way out on 
California street, the choirmaster and 
organist, Mr. D. W. Loring, of the Lor- 
ing Club, was unable to be present one 
Sunday morning, on account of illness. 
The dilemma being plainly manifest, a 
stranger thereupon stepped to the front, 
and volunteered to play the organ. His 
offer was gratefully accepted and he 
played so well as to arouse renewed ex- 
pressions of obligation at the conclusion 
of the performance. They inquired his 
name, and it was passed around. 

"Just think," said the good rector's 
wife, rapturously. "The British Consul 
played for us this morning. And he's so 
delighted with our service, that he has 
promised to play every Sunday, — of 
course, without charge!" 

" Ah!" commented the cynical warden. "Are you sure 
it's Mr. Warburton, the British Consul-General?" 

"Oh, yes. He told me himself he is Mr. Warburton." 

"I guess," interposed the more cautious rector. "I 
guess we had better investigate farther; I shall ask him 
the direct question.'' 

"Are you the British Consui-General?" the parson de- 
manded of the musician, when next he pressed : the keys. 

"Well, no," admitted Mr. J. B. Warburton. "But 
then," he added, "I'd like to be." 

And the social dream of the rector's wife was hopelessly 

punctured. 

* * * 

The late Bishop William Ingraham Kip of this city was 
a very lovable old man but, considering that he was a 
churchman, was very proud of his aristocratic family con- 
nection. He came from an old Dutch family, his ancestors 
having sailed over to New York from Holland three 
hundred years ago. 

Having considerable private means, and not being de- 
pendent upon bis diocesan salary, the Bishop made fre- 
quent trips to Europe and upon his return from abroad he 
always committed the indiscretions, not uncommon with 
European travelers, of talking a great deal about the 
noble persons he had met. It was, "My friend, Lord 
This," and "My relative, Lord That," until even the 
Bishop's admirers felt rather tired. 

One Episcopal layman, a hard headed business man, 
proud of his American birth and in love with his demo- 
cratic ideals, was especially disgusted. 

"The Bishop gives me a pain," he said, frankly. "Be- 
sides he isn't on to his job," he continued. "He seems to 
know all about every Lord in creation, except the Lord 
God Almighty!" 

* * » 

As the descendent of an old pioneer Dutch family of New 
York, the Reverend W. I. Kip Jr., believes that in his 
teaching and preaching he should inculcate Christian 
patriotism. His flock in the Good Samaritan Mission in- 
cludes all sorts of people, of varied nationalities, and the 
Bishop's grandson is anxious that they should all become 
good and intelligent Americans. 

With this thought in mind, on the Sunday nearest to 
the anniversary of the Nation's birth, the young parson 
primed himself with sentiments at once pious and pat- 



July 23. 1898. 



SAX FRANCISCO M-.tt'S LETTER. 



'9 



riotic. To prepare the way, he asked, as he thought, u 
perfectly safe question of his Sunday school pupils. 

" What remarkable event occurred on the Fourth ol 
July?" he queried. 

-olid, stolid bov of foreign birth, and who is usually 
slow to answer, eave quickly this astonishing rep 
pher Columbus discoveredAmerka." 

" Nonsense' Nonsense!'' exclaimed the disgusted divine, 
rather testily. 

" Didn't he?" pursued the little Arab. 

"Of course not," replied the annoyed clergyman, who 
forgot all about the point he had intended to make when 
the enterprising scholar, pursuing his advantage, pro- 
pounded the unanswerable question: 

" Who did then?" 

* # # 

Embonpoint is so much the fashion now that slight girls 
are frequently obliged to resort to various subterfuges to 
aid a grudging nature. 

The other day a young woman, quite tall and rather 
thin, whose beautiful home is on Washington street, was 
the cynosure of all eyes in the fashionable parade along 
Kearny street, the primal cause being her beautifully 
plump and rounded hips. They constituted the only re- 
deeming curves in an otherwise unbroken succession of 
physical angularities, and would have done credit to a wo- 
man as stout as this girl was lean. 

Unfortunately for the impression upon the minds of the 
spectators, however, something went wrong with the 
mechanism of her raiment, so that the hips gradually 
worked around until they protruded gracefully from her 
right side, suggesting a gigantic abscess or a misplaced 
hump. 

"Get on to her curves," shouted a graceless urchin, 
voicing the unspoken thoughts of better bred people. 

The embarrassed damsel retired to a convenient door- 
way and after vainly trying to readjust those rounded hips, 
she unhooked them, and carried them home in a small 

package under her arm. 

* * * 

For so many years, Probate Judge 
James V. Coffey has been considered at 
once the wit and the censor of the 
bench, that His Honor is quite imbued 
with the idea that he has a reputa- 
tion to sustain, and particularly thathe 
must say something sharp to or about 
everyone who crosses the threshold of 
bis court. This disposition to be a uni- 
versal and perpetual critic has, in the 
fullness of time, rather lost its point, 
and those who are obliged to listen to 
the Judge's diatribes' irreverently mut- 
ter ■''old bore" under ^heir breaths. 

It is scarcely a matter for wduder 
that many years experience in probate 
matters has given Judge Coffey a poor 
opinion of general honesty. After many concise and cut- 
ting remarks about this popular^ weakness for the posses- 
sions of others, the Judge, a couple of years ago, t repared 
an elaborate and ironical oration on thieving and thieves. 
Then he deposited a silver florin on his desk, just before 
his departure one afternoon, intending the next morning 
to deliver his biting address about the man who had 
stolen the foreign coin. 

But the habitues of the court room were "on" to the sly 
jurist, and to Judge Coffey's unspeakable disgust, when he 
went to his desk next day, there was the florin just as he 
had left it. For two years the coin has lain on the desk, 
in plain view of all who have business in that department. 
Once when an attorney leaned over to speak to His 
Honor, the latter's heart beat expectantly. But the 
lawyer perhaps did not notice the florin, — at any rate he 
did not take it. 

Judge Coffey's great oration still slumbers in its author's 
breast. Buturobate business is dull just now and the 

Judge 'as 'opes. 

* * * 

They have some odd ways in the fin-de-siecle churches, 
in this year of grace, and not a few of the clever adver- 
tising schemes would do credit to the enterprise of a show- 




man. The Reverend Archdeacon Emery, who is nothing 
if not up-to-date, advertised, for last Sunday night ul his 
Episcopal Church of the Advent, a strictly musical pro 
gramme. The entertainment was to be of that character 
k -.own as o benefit performance, the entire gate receipts 
to be given to that estimable organization, tin' Red Cross 
League. Only instead of "gate receipts," he discreetly 
used the word "collection." 

But if the announcement was racy, the sacred concert 
itself presented a r»»rYi/i »>/». which was deliciously funny. 
The rendering of the programme occupied n ore 
time than was expected although, of course, there 
were no encores. Signs of restlessness were unmistakably 
in evidence, and when it came to the last hymn, the 
worthy Archdeacon, understanding the general sigh of 
relief, instead of commanding the choir to sing the entire 
hymu, as is customary, thought he would make time by a 
little curtailment. 

" We will sing only the first and last stanzas," he an- 
nounced. 

But in the course of the singing when it was discovered 
that the last verse was a precise repetition of the first 
there were first smiles, then snickering. 

They have a new name now for the hardworking clergy- 
man. He is called "Archdeacon Ditto." 



A Panorama 440 Miles Lonj 
From the Observation Car on the New York Central a living pan- 
orama 440 miles long may be seen. This includes the Uenesse, 
Black River and Mohawk Valleys and 143 miles of the Hudson 
River, including the foothills of the Adirondack Mountains; the 
Capitol at Albanv; the Oatskill Mountains; the Palisades of the 
Hudson and the New York Central's magnificent approach to the 
metropolis — this being the only trunk line whose traiDr enter the 
citv of New iork- , 

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Jackson's Napa Soda knocks rheumatism^ 



" REMEMBER MANILA " 




But do no: 
forget that 

KEYSTONE 
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BOOKBINDER, Paper-Ruler, Printer, 
and Blank-Book Manufacturer. 
Niantic block, corner Clay and Sansome streets. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




WE bave Dot for several 
years had so disagree- 
aole a July as the present 
one is proving to be with its 
gloomy skies, fogs, and cold 
winds. As usual the weather 
has been provokingly disa- 
greeable, when all San Franciscans were anxious it should 
be the best, so as to favorably impress our military visit- 
ors, to say nothing of lessening the discomforts of their 
camp life, which at the best is far from pleasant. Still 
more of the soldier boys have departed this week and more 
are likely soon to follow, but, while they are here, untiring 
efforts are made to render their stay as pleasant as possi- 
ble. On Tuesday evening the ladies of the M. E. Church, 
on California street, gave a reception to the members of 
the first New York Regiment, which was a great success. 
The Seventh California Regiment showed what it could do 
in the way of military evolutions on Thursday evening at 
the Pavilion, where the Native Daughters' Red Cross 
Drill was held, and, after the different items on the pro- 
gramme were gone through, there was dancing to the 
music of the Seventh Regiment band. 

Dinners continue to be almost the only form of enter- 
taining done in the city, and since the arrival of the New 
York regiment they have been very numerous; so many of 
our residents hail from the Knickerbocker State that 
relatives and friends are plentiful among those that are 
here m route to stirring fields of action. Dinners are, 
however, by no means confined to the city; they are very 
popular at Burlingame, Menlo Park, Sausalito, and also 
at San Rafael, all places so easy of access that leave can 
readily be obtained to take advantage of invitations there- 
to. At San Rafael they are given by guests at the Hotel 
Rafael, by the cottagers, and at Fairfax Villa — summer 
visitors giving them there frequently, the drive thither 
and back again being one of the pleasant features of the 
parties. The Misses Hopkins at Menlo Park. Miss Addie 
Murphy at Sausalito, and the Misses Alice and Bessie 
Ames, in Ross Valley, are among the young ladies who 
have presided at out-of-town entertainments during July; 
and Miss Ella Goodall, as the guest of Miss Ethel Tomp- 
kins, at San Anselmo, came in for many a pleasant little 
gathering among the dwellers near by. 

The marriage of Colonel William Macdonald and Miss 
Alice Wolf was very quietly celebrated at the home of the 
bride on Pine street on Wednesday afternoon, Judge 
Belcher making the happy pair man and wife in the pres- 
ence of a limited number of relatives and friends. Neither 
bride nor groom Lad any bridal attendants, and after the 
dljeuner which followed the ceremony, Culonel and Mrs. 
Macdonald departed on a honeymoon trip to Mexico, and 
upon their return wi 1 ! reside at the Richelieu. 

Oakland will have a wedding in the course of a few 
weeks which gives promise of being a notable one, the en- 
gagement. having just been announced of Miss Dora Craig, 
one of Oakland's fair daughters, to Dr. F. W. Morse of 
this city. The date of the marriage, though not yet 
definitely named, will probably be some time in October. 
A wedding of the near future of interest to San Fran- 
ciscans will be that of Miss Katherine Kerens of St. Louis 
to Lieut. McKenna, U. S. A., (who is one of our Native 
Sons), whose engagement was made known to his Cali- 
fornia friendb last week. The marriage, which will be 
celebrated at the home of the bride-elect in Western Vir- 
ginia, will undoubtedly be a brilliant gathering. Another 
engagement which gives promise of a brilliant church cere- 
monial is that of Miss Eva Moody and H. C. Breedon. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charley Baldwin are receiving the con- 
gratulations of their friends on the advent of their second 
son. Apropos of congratulations, their friends here are 
jubilant over the recent promotion of those popular young 
officers and society favorites, Lieutenants Frank Wilcox 
and Chas. L. Bent, U. S. A. 




Pleasant as the 
month of July has 
been at Del Monte, 
the indications are that it will 
be very gay during August. 
Those who are now there will 
remain, and a fresh contingent 
of visitors are looked for early 
in the month. Among those 
who will pass a part of August, 
at least, at Del Monte, are 
Mr. and Mrs. George Pope, 
Mr. and Mrs. Perry Eyre, 
Miss Carrie Taylor, Mr. and 
Mrs. Jo Tobin and the Misses 
Beatrice and Celia Tobin, Mr. 
and Mrs. C. B. Alexander, 
Mrs. Lloyd Tevis and Mrs. 
Fred Sharon. Among recent 
arrivals are the Downey Har- 
veys, who will remain several 
weeks, Mrs. Casserly and 
Miss Daisy, Miss Alice Ruther- 
ford, Mrs. and Miss McBean, 
Miss Hoffman, Mrs. Charley 
Keeney, the Misses Hamiltoi, Mrs. Geo. Wells, Miss 
Marie Oge, the Misses Sachs, Bob Grayson, and others. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ed Hopkins and their daughters are vis- 
iting their mountain home near Boca; Mr. and Mrs. 
Ignatz Steinhart are now occupying one of the Hotel 
Rafael cottages, and will remain there the rest of the 
summer, and the J. W. Lilienthals are "at home" in one 
of those recently built by Sidney Smith. Major and Mrs. 
Darling bave changed their base from Highland Springs 
to Mioa, Springs; Mrs. Homer King and Miss King are at 
Castle Crags; Mr. and Mrs. Will Tevis, Mr. and Mrs. 
Arthur Page, and Mrs. Lizzie Ralston are among recent 
arrivals at Lake Tahoe, where Mrs. H. E. Huntington and 
her daughters will spend the next few weeks. 

A very interesting golden wedding anniversary will oe 
celebrated to-morrow by Mr. and Mrs. B. L. Brandt at 
their residence on Sutter street; interesting, from the 
fact that four generations will assist at the function, 
which will be on quite an elaborate scale. The daughter 
of the old couple, Mrs. Louis Liebes, her daughter Mrs. 
Furst, and her grandson Charles Furst, have come from 
their home in New York to be present on the happy occa- 
sion. 

Since the Fourth of July festivities 
came to an end guests at the Hotel 
Rafael have settled down, so to speak, 
to a regular course of life, which in- 
cludes tenDis, golf, rides and drives, 
and dolcefarnieitte lounges on the broad 
balconies of the hotel; and by way of 
interlude are pleasant little gatherings 
such as Mrs. Bessie Paxton's recent 
tamale party, which was a jolly 
with interchange of hospitalities 
between hotel dwellers and residents 
in Ross Valley, with- music and dancing 
of an evening. The paper chase seems 
to have lost little of its fascination for 
those who have ridden both last season 
and this, and the start and the finish , 
are always sure to attract crowds 
enthusiastic outsiders. 
- Mrs. Morton Mitchell better known 
here possibly eitner as Miss Lizzie 
Miller or Mrs. Geo. Ladd, is again a 
familiar feature of San Francisco life. 
She and Mr. Mitchell are here on a 
pnssear from their Eastern home, and 
have been the recipients of many hospitalities since their 
arrival last week. Mrs. W. M. Gwin and Miss May Belle 
are expected home next week from their trip East. The 
P. N. Lilienthals have returned from Highland Springs. 

Wedding and Birthday Presents. Magnificent assortment 10 
select from at the art store of S. & G. Gump. 113 Geary street. 

Sober up on Jackson's Napa Soda. 




July 2j, 1898. 



SAN FRANCISCO m:\vs i.i-ttkr. 



The "Progressive Euchre Ciub at Kenilwortli Inn played 
an Interesting fame Tuesday night. Mr? Charli 
Jucl^on an.i \V. E. Veazie carried ofT thp honors, Tl e 
unfortunate ones were Mrs. Veazie and Miss Maudl 
son. There are many guests at the Inn f.ir Chi 

A lecture is to be delivered bv Verv Rev. T. I;. S»gan, 
S. S., D. n. President of St. John's Seminary, 1; 
Mass., under the auspices of Ignatian Council. No. 35, 
Young Men's Institute. Metropolitan Hall. Monday even- 
ing, July 25, 1898. subject: -Personal Reminiseei 
the Siege of Pa r 

Alex. B. Wilberforce gave a luncheon last Wednesday to 
Professor Albutt. Regius Professor of Physic, University 
of Cambridge, and his wife and niece, Miss England and 
Miss Sargeant. The party arrived here on the 16th inst., 
and leave for Japan Dext Tuesday, the 26th inst. 



THE NEW DEPOT. 



SFTER many long delays the great ferry depot at the 
foot of Market street is at length a completed struc- 
ture, and has been turned over to the public whose money 
paid for it. There appears to be but one expression of 
opinion, which is that the massive building is a credit to 
the State, and is well worth the delays and the outlay of 
treasure that it represents. It is a harmonious combina- 
tion of iron, steel, stone and wood, so blended as to pre- 
sent an elegant, rich appearance, in which strength and 
durability are happily combined with convenience, utility 
and graceful architectural lines. 

The gratifying results are in a very large measure due 
to the careful eff.irts of the supervising architect, E. R. 
Swain, who for the pest two years has given his time and 
continuous attention to the work. Both the small details 
and larger contracts have received the benefit of his 
practical skill, and the cnmpleted depot is a compliment 
to his ability as it is a source of general pride to the citi- 
zens of California. The remarkable contrast, between this 
splendid and imposing structure and the cramped and 
mean quarters that are being torn away, only accents the 
; beauty of desian and convenience of arrangement of this 
i the must costly and handsome bui!ding of the kind on the 
I Pacific Coast. 

ft CHAMPIONSHIP rowing regatta for four-oared 
barge races will be held at El Campo on Sunday (to- 
morrow) under the auspices of the Pacific Amateur 
Athletic Union. The races will be called promptly at one 
o'clock in the afternoon, and club entries will be from the 

, South Ends, Ariels, Pioneers, Olympics, Alamedas, 
Dolphins and Stocktous. Pare for round trip, including 

: admission to the grounds, 25 cents. Steamer Ukiah leaves 
Tiburon Perry, foot of Market street, at 10 30 a. m., 12 10, 

. 2 00 and 4.00 p. m. Returning, leaves El Campo at 11.15 

; a. m., 1.00, 3.00 and 5.00 p, m. 

THE Bay State Oyster House, 15 Stockton street, has 
been specially refurnished by the proprietor, N. M. 
j Adler, and the appointments and apartments in that fine 
: building are now all that the most fastidious taste could 
: wish. The cuisine is in charge of a skilled chef and the 
. tables are served in a manner that leaves nothing to be 
1 di-tsired. Everything is new and strictly up to date. 



ONLY one dollar to Santa Rosa and return Sunday, 
(to-morrow) July 24, by the San Francisco & North 
Pacific Railway. Get tickets at Tiburon ferry, from 
which dock boats leave at 8 and 9:30 a. m. 



Real Warm Weather Rest and Comfort. 
There is a powder to be shaken into the shoes called Allen's Foot- 
Ease, invented by Allen S. Olmsted, Le Eoy, N. Y.. which druggists 
and shoe dealers say is the best thing they have ever sold to cure swol- 
len, burning, sore and tender or aching feet, yonie dealers claim that it 
makes tight or new shoes feel easy. It certainly will cure corns and 
bunions and relieve instantly sweating, hot or smarting feet. 
Allen's Foot- Ease costs only a quarter, and the inventor will ser-d a 
sample free to any address. 

Parties who have cash to pay can get some wonderful bargain" in 
pianos for the coming two weeks at Mauvais' Music Store, No. 793 
Market street. 

Indigestion dies where Jackson's Napa Soda lives. 



College San ffiafael 

For Young Ladies. 

Winter term commencts August 4th, 1898 

Conducted in ibe maiaro ol si. Dominie. 
Full eultftflo coumeof Stud ten. a r>tmnlinK school of highest 
graiiL*. Superb m-.iiern but Id tog. Sloan boated, Beautiful 
and cumtoudlnueclaofi rc>- ins. Music and .>rt rooms. 

Looated io the love); Maimolla Vallejr. 

UONnrpiiftwd for benuiy wod BtmlttlfulctWa. AUdWfiR. 

MOTHER -UPfcPIOR. 
UolWr Pun K»fael. San Rafael. Cal 

IRVING INSTITUTE fS^SWH^ da * 8Ch001 

2126 California St., S. F . 

Accredited to the Universities. Seminary and full Conservatory of 
Music. Primary department for children. A carriage will call. 
For further Infoimation address the principal, 

Rev. Edward B. Church. A. n. 

A boarding and day school for boys 
aDd young men. 

Christmas Session Opens First Monday in August. 
An accredited school with the University of Cal fornia and the Ice- 
land Stanford Jr. University. A corps of eleven teachers. 

Rev. Dr. Spalding, Rector, 

3300 Washington street, S. P. 

HRS. C. H. BEANE'S SELECT SCHOOL 

Will commence its new term AUGUST 1.1898. 

All English branches taught Also special attention given to the 
course or study followed'by the public schools. 

For further particulars apply at 

2073 MISSION STREET, San Francisco. 

MILLS COLLEGE AND SEMINARY 

Grants diplomas and confers degrees. Rare opportunities offered 
innusic. One hour's ride from San Francisco. Write for cata- 
logue to 

MRS- G. , T. MILLS, President, 

Mills College P; Cv, Alameda County, Cal. - 

Thirty-second year. Fall term opens August 3, 1898. 



TRINITY SCHOOL. 



■LUDLnMT^ 

928 Sutter St. 



ELOCUTION and 

DRAMATIC ART 



Trie SOLLY WALTER School ot Illustration. 



In Pen and ink. 



26 O'Farrell Street. 



San FranGisco Dress-Gutting School, 

French tailor method taught. Full course ■ f instruction in the 
art of Dressmaking. Patterns cut to order. Teims reasonable. 

NO. 916 MARKET ST., Opposite the Emporium, San Francisco. 

Should use DAMIANA BIT- 
TERS, the great Mexican rem- 
edy; it gives health and strength to the Sexual Organs. Depot at 323 Mar- 
ket street, San Francisco. Send for oircular. 



Weak Hen and Women 



D 



R. T. FELIX GOURAUD'S ORIENTAL 
CREAM, OR MAGICAL BEAUTIFIER. 



Removes Tan, Pimples, Freckles, Moth 
Patches, Rash, and Skin Diseases, and 
every blemish on beauty, and defies de- 
tection. It has stood the test of 48 years 
and Is so harmless we taste it to be sure 
it is properly made. Accept no counter- 
feit of similar name. Dr L. A Sayre 
said to a lady of the haut-ton {a pa- 
tient): "As you ladies will use them, I 
recommend * Gouraud's Cream ' as the 
'east harmful of all the Skin prepara- 
, tions. 1 ' For sale by all Druggists and 
Fancy-goods Dealers in the United 
States, Ganadas, and Europe 




FERD. T. HOPKINS, Prop'r. 

37 Great Jones St., N. Y. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 23, 1S98. 



INSURANCE. 

LIFE insurance agents complain that the farmers have 
no money and will not insure. Farmers in Fresno 
County are feeding raisins to their horses. Barley is 
worth" $30 per ton, while the cheapest grade of raisins is 
worth $20 per ton. This peculiar condition is paralleled 
in Louisiana, where planters have for a long time been 
feeding molasses to live stock. 

The Providenee-Washingtou has re-insured the entire 
business of the Narwood Fire Insurance Company of New 
York, organized in 1695. The Narwood had assets on 
January 1, 1898. of $269,064. 

President R. Dale Benson, in announcing the advance- 
ment of Russell W. Osborn to the assistant management 
of the Pennsylvania's Pacific Coast department, pays the 
latter gentleman a handsome and well deserved compli- 
ment. 

The Massachusetts Legislature has adjiurned without 
having passed the valued policy law. 

The criminal libel suit brought against the editor and 
publisher of the Insurance Review has been dismissed so 
far as the former gentleman is concerned, and Mr. 
Edward, the owner of the magazine, has been bound over 
to answer before the Superior Court. 

Manager Millard Weyman, of the Merchants' Fire, is in 
the Northwest. 

A narrow escape from a fire was experienced under 
peculiar circumstances in a Spokane book store last Sun- 
day. In the front window of the store were some magni- 
fying glasses on exhibition. The warm rays of the sun in 
the afternoon, passing through the glasses, set fire to the 
paper covering the display window. The burning paper 
attracted the attention of a bystander in time to prevent 
a conflagration. 

Vice-President Tillinghast, of the Provident Savings 
Life, is still looking for a man to represent his company 
on this coast, the resignation of Geo. L. North having 
left this department without a head. 

The Colinsche Reinsurance Company will make a deposit 
in Connecticut, and enter this country for business. 

The Union Surety Company has been organized under a 
Pennsvlvanian charter. Capital $500,000; surplus, 
$150,liiio 

John E. Morris has been elected Secretary of the 
Travelers', to succeed the late Geo. Ellis. 

United States Manager Chas. H. Post, of the Cale- 
donian, is making a business trip to this ciast. 

Seiond Vice-President Perkins, of the New York Life, 
is in Germany. 

Edward Barr succeeds J. J. Gibbons as Vice-President 
of the Manhattan Fire. 

Chas. A. McLane, of the New York Life, is at the 
springs with his family. 

Mayor Phelan has publicly thanked Insurance Commis- 
sioner Clunie for the influence exerted by the latter in 
collecting from the Fidelity and Deposit Company the 
$100,0110 due the city on the defaulting Treasurer's bond. 

The action of the Supreme Court of California in affirm- 
ing the decision of the lower court in the case of the 
Stockton Agricultural Works is. various insurance com- 
panies, will cost the latter $90,000 besides interest and 
court expenses. 

Eugene Fransun, President of the Teutonia Fire Insur- 
ance Company, died on the 11th at his residence in Phila- 
delphia, aged eighty-one years. He enjoyed the respect 
of all who knew him, and was very popular among the 
Germans. 

The complaiuts of bad business in insurance circles of 
San Francisco appear to have real foundation when even 
the oldest and cleverest managers are affected. We note 
that our old and esteemed friend Col. William Macdonald 
has found it impossible to keep the Wolfe from his door. 

ALUS- PKKs-i Ci.ipi . m.i Montgomery strcol, S. F., deals 

Id all kinds of newspaper information, business personal, political, from 
press of State, Coast, and Country. Tel. Main 



FlItEstatlonery, steel and copperplate engraving. Cooper ft Co. 740 
Harkelstreet.San Francisco 

Jaok33n*8 Napa Soda Lemonade is a luxury— try it. 




Capital Subscribed $4,482, T50 

LONDON ASSURANCE, capital paid u P 2.241.37s 

Assets 19,196,146 

Capital Subscribed . $5 000 000 

OCEAN MARINE. Capital Paid Up 600.000 

Assets 2.502,050 

- INSURANCE. 

FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

Firemans Fund 

INSURANCE COMPANY, OF SAN FRANCISCO, OAL. 

Capital, $1,000,000. Assets, $3,500,000. 



PALATINE 



INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited), OF MANCHESTER, ENGLAND. 
SOLID SECURITY. OVER $9,000,000.00 RESOURCES 

CHAS. A. LATON, Manager 439 California St.. S. F. 

Firi Insurance. 

CONNECTICUT FIRE INSURANCE CO. OF HARTFORD. 

Capital Paid Up 11 ,000.000 

Assets 8,800,018 

Surplus to Polloy Holders 1,988,832 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager. 

(Til IM M BflVn San Ftanclsoo Agent, 

OULin HI. DUIU. n. W. Cor. Sacramento and Montgomery Sts., S. F. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INSURANCE CO., LIMITED, 

OF LIVERPOOL. 
Capital §8,700,00» 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., Agents. 

No. 818 California at., 8. P 
Founded A. D. 1702 

Insurance Company ot North America 

Or PHILADELPHIA, PENN. 

Paid-up Capital 18,000,000 

Surplus to Polloy Holders 6,022,018 

JAMES D. BAILEY, General Agent, 412 California St., S. F. 

ROYAL EXCHANGE ASSURANCE, OF LONDON. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, A. D. 1738. 

Capital Paid Up. 18,448,100. Assets, 121.584,418. 

Surplus to Policy Holders, 18.980.251. 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager. FRANK W. DICKSON, Ass't Manager. 

501-503 Montgomery St., comer Sacramento. 

PHOENIX ASSURANCE CO. OF LONDON Relished its. 
PROVIDENCE-WASHINGTON INSURANCE CO. '-oorporawd m 

BUTLER & HALDAN. General Agents. 

418 California St., S. * 

THE THURINGIA INSURANCE COMPANY. 

Of ERFURT, GEltKAN 
Capital. 12,250.000 Assets. «10.9M.2->S 
Pacific Coast Department: 204-208 SANSOME ST., S. F. 

VOSS. CONRAD & CO.. General manage.-* 






July iy, 1898. 



SAN FRANCISCO NKWS LETTER. 



»3 



Southern Pacific Co. --Pacific System. 

Train! Learc »Dil »ro Du« to Arrive al SAN FRANCISCO: 
(Main Line Fool ot Market Street ) 



Lratt I 



Frvm July K ISM 



I .4rrtw 



•J.-OOA 
7»a 
;kja 
7:00A 
7 .Sua 
SK» A 
llJUA 

8:30 A 
•8:30 j 
• :U0A 



10 00 a 
•1«JP 



10 

6 



4:30 P 
4:30 p 
4.30 P 

4:30 P 
4:8UP 

5:0up 
•8:00 p 

e«ip 

J7:00p 
8:00 p 



Niles. Sao Jose. and way stations 

Beolcla Suisun. and Sacramento 

Marrsrllle. OroTlllc. and Redding, via Woodland.. 

E 1 mi ra. Vacaville and Ramsey 

Martinez. San Ramon, Vailejo. Napa. Cahstoga. Santa Rosa 6 

Atlantic Express. Ogden and East 8 

San Jose, Stockton, Vall«y Spring, lone, Sacramento, 

MarysTllle Cnlco. Tehama, and Red Bluff 4 

Peters, Oakdale, and Jamestown ? 

Hilton •; 

New Orleans Express, Merced. Fresno, Babersfleld, Santa 
Barbara. Los Angeles, Demlng. E) Paso, New Orleans, and 

East 6: 

Vailejo, Martinez, and way stations 7 

Sacramento River steamers «Q 

Sad Jose, Ktles, and Way Stations If: 

Llvermore, Mendota, Hanford, and Vlsalla 4: 

Llvermore San Jose, Niles and .Vay Stations J10: 

Martinez, San Ramon, Vailejo, Napa, Callstoga, El Verano 

and Santa Rosa 

Benlcla. Vacaville, Woodland, Knight's Landing, Marys- 

vllle, Orovllle, and Sacramento 10 

Niles. San Jose, Tracy, and Stockton 7: 

Stockton and Lodl 12: 

Lath<-op. Modes! j, Merced. Fresno, Mojave, Santa Barbara 

and Los Angeles . 7 

Martinez, Merced, (Raymond for Yosemlte) and Fresno 12 

Santa Fe Route, Atlannc Express, for Mojave and East 6 

European mall, Ogden and East , 9 

Vailejo 12 

Hayw*rd8. Niles and San Jose 7 

Vailejo, Port Costa.-and way stations 19 

Oreguu Express, Sacramento, Marysvllle, Redding, Port- 
land Pueet Sound und East 8 



46A 
46 a 
46P 

:46P 
16 P 
:46P 

:16P 
16 p 

:1ft r 



46 P 
.45 P 
:0UP 

15 a 

16 p 
15A 

:15A 

45A 

15 P 

16 P 

:45A 
:15P 
:46p 
46 A 
ISP 
:45 t 

:45P 



San leandro and Hat wards Local, (Foot of Market St.) 



8:00 A I 
9:00 A 
10:00 a 
ill .00 a' 
112:00 m\ 
iS-M e 
5:00 p 
7:00 p[ 



melhose, Seminary Park, 
fltchbubg. elhhdrst, 
San Lbandbu. 
South San Leandrd. 

Estudillo. Lorenzo. 
Cherry, and Hay wards 

i Runs through to Niles. 
t From Niles 



7:15 A 
**9:45 A 
10:45 A 
11:45 A 
12:46 P 
(1:45 P 
12:45 p 
15:46 P 

7:46 P 



Coast Division (Narrow Gauge). (Foot of Market St.) 

t7:45ASanta Cruz Excursion, Santa Cruz and Principal Way 

Stations 18:05 P 

8:15a Newark, Oenterville. San Jose, Felton, Boulder Creek, Santa 

Cruz and way stations 5:50p 

•2:16 p Newark, Centerville, San Jose, New Almaden, Felton, Boul- 
der Creek, Santa Cruz, and principal way stations *10:5Ua 

4:15p San Jose, Glenwood and way stations 9:20 A 

<z4:15p Boulder Creek and Santa Cruz ,/' 9:20 a 

CREEK ROUTE FERRY. 

From San Francisco— Foot of Market street (Slip 8).— »7:15, 9:00, and 
11:00 a. H., 11:00. •2:00,13:00, «4:00, 15:00 and «6:00p. h. 

From Oakland— Foot of Broadway.— «6:00, 8:00, 10:00 A. h.; J12:00, »1:00, 
I8:00,«3:00, 14:00 *5:00P. H. 

Coast Division (Broad Gauge). (Third and Townsend streets), 

•7-OOA 
}7:30 A 



lot 
:00A 
85 A 



-.n A 

00 A 

:45A 

:35 A 
.30 P 
TOP 



San Joseandwaystations(New Almaden Wednesdays only) 1 
Sunday Excursion for San Jose, Santa Cruz, Pacific Grove, 

and Principal Way Stations 18 

» :uo A San Jose, Tres Pinos, Santa Cruz, Paoiflo Grove, Paso Robles 

San LuisObispo, Guadalupe, Surf and princlpalwaystatlons 4 

10:40a San Jose and way stations'.-* *8 

11:80 A San Jose and way stations *8 

•2:45 p San Mateo, Redwood, Menlo Park, Palo Alto Santa Clara, 
San Jose. Gllroy, Hollister, Santa Cruz, Salinas, Mon- 
terey, and Pacific Grove *10: 

•3-3TP San Jose and Way Stations *9: 

•4:15 P San Jose and Principal Way Stations 

•5:00 p San Jose and Prinoipal Way Stations .. 

6:30pSan Jose and principal way stations 5 

6:30p San Jose and way stations... 7 

til :45p San Jose and way stations 7 

A for Morning, p for Afternoon. «Sundays excepted. tSaturdays only. 

ISundays only, 

a Saturdays and S indays. j Sundays and Mondays. 

The Pacific Transfer Cohpant will oall for and check baggage from 
hotels and residences. Enquire of Ticket Agents for Time Cards and 
other information. 

Occidental and Oriental Steamship Co. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Steamers leave wharf, FIRST and BRANNAN STREETS, at 1 p h. , for 

YOKOHAMA AND HONGKONG, 

calling at nobe (Hiogo), Nagasaki and Shanghai, and connecting at 
Hongkong with steamers for India, etc. No cargo reoeived on board on 
day of sailing. 

Gaelic (via Hono'ulu) Tuesday, July 26, 1898 

Doric (via Honolulu) Saturday, August 13. 1898 

Bblqic (via Honolulu) Saturday, September 3, 1898 

Coptic (via Honolulu) Thursday, Sept. 22, 1898 

Round Trip Tickets at reduced Rates. 

For freight or passage apply at Company's Office, No. 421 Market street, 
uner First. D. D. STUBBS, General Manager. 



San Francisco and North Pacific R'y Co. 



SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. TlBUROH FABRY- Foot ol MarkotStreet. 

WEEK DAYS— 7:30.9:00. 11:00 a u : 12:36, S:»0 5:10. 8:80 P h. Thursdays— 
Extra trip at 11:30 p H. Saturdays— Extra trips at 1:60 and 11:80 P M. 
SUNDAYS— 8:00,9:30, 11:00a h; 1:30. 3:30, 5:00. 6:20 p 11. 

SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO, 

WEEK DAYS-«:IO,7:60,9:20, 11:10 AH; 12:46, S:40,6:10PH. Saturdays— 
Extra trips at 1:66 and 6:36 p H. 

SUNDAYS— 8:10, 9:40, 11:10 AH; 1:40, 8 -40, 6:00, 6:25/ P M. 

Between San Francisco and Sohuetzen Park, same schedule as above. 



Leave S. F. 


In Effect June 86, 1898 


Arrive in s.f. 


Week Days. Sundays. 


Destination. 


Sundays 


Week Days 


7:30AH 
8:30 PH 
5:10 PH 


8:00 AH 

:30AM 
5:00PM 


Novato, 
Petaluma, 
Santa Rosa. 


10:40 am 
6:10 pm 
7:36 PH 


8:40 AH 
10:26 ah 
6:22 ph 


"7:80 ah" 


8:00 AH 


Fulton, Windsor, 

Healdsburg, 

Gey8erville, Clovdrdale 


7:86ph 


10:26 A M 


9:80 fh 


8:29 p H 


7:30 AH I 8:00AH I tj„„,„„j tth x. 

3:30 ph 1 i Hopland, TJkiah 


7:85 PH 


10:26 AH 

6:22ph 


7:80AH 1 8:O0AH 1 n__»_tir. 
8:80ph 1 1 Guernevllle. 


7:86ph 


10:26 A H 
6:22 P H 


7:30am I 8:00ah I Sonoma, 
6:10ph 1 5:00pm | Glen Ellen. 


10:40 am 
6:10pm 


8:40 A H 
6:22 p H 


7:30am 
8:30pm 


8:00am 
5:00pm 


Sebastopbl. 


10:40 am 
7:36 pm 


10:26 A H 
6:22 P H 



Stages connect at Santa Rosa for Mark West Springs; at Lytton for 
Lytton Springs ; at Geyserville for Skaggs' Springs ; at.Cloverda'le for the 
Geysers; at Hopland for. Duncan Springs. Highland Springs, Kelsey- 
vllle. Carlsbad Springs, Soda Bay, Lakeport, and Bartlett Springs; at 
TJkiah, for Vichy Springs, Saratoga Springs, Blue Lakes, Laurel Del 
Lake, Upper Lake, Porno, Potter Valley,, John Day's, Riverside. Lier- 
ley's, Bucknell's Sanhedrin Heights, Hullville; Booneville, Orr's Springs, 
Mendocino City, Ft. Bragg, Westport, Usal. 

Saturday-to-Monday Round Trip Tickets at reduced rates. On Sundays', 
Round Trip Tiokets to all points beyond San Rafael at half rates 

TICKET OFFICEH650 Market St., Chroniole Building. 

A.W.FOSTER, Pres.fc Gen. Manager. R. X. RYAN, (Jen. Pass. Agent. 



Santa Fe 
Route 



Santa Fe Pacific R. R. Co. , 
6 1 Chronicle Building, S. P. 



REMOVAL N0TIGE 

Alter July 1, 1898, the. Freight and 
Passenger offices of this company 
■will be located at 

628 Market Street. 

H. C. Bush, General Agent Freight Dept. 
John L. Tbuslow, General Ag't Pass. Dept. 



Pacific Coast Steamship Co. 




Steamers leave Broadway 
Wharf, San Francisco. 

For Alaskan ports. 10 a.. w. July 25, 30; August 4, 9, 14, 
19, 24; transfer at Seattle. 

For Alaskan ports (from FolsomSt. wharf) 10 A. M., 
August 3, 23; transfer at Portland. Or 

For R. C. and Puget Sound Ports, 10 a. m,. July 5, 
10, 15. 20, 2-=., 30; Aug 4, and every fifth-dav ihereafter. 

For Eureka (Humboldt Bay) iO A. M., July 1,7. 13, 19, 
25. 31; August 6, and every sixth day thereafter. 
For Newport (Los Angeles) and way*ports,9 a. m. July 
4,8 12. 16, 2), 24. 28; August ], and every fourth day thereafter. 

For San Diego, stopping only at Port Harford, Santa Barbara, Port Los 
Angeles. Redondo, (Los Angeles) 11 A. H., July 2,6, 10, 14, 18. 22, 26, 30; 
August 3, and every fourth day thereafter. 
For Mexican ports, 10 a. m., 18th of every month. 
For further information obtain folder. 

The company reserves the right to ohange, without previous notice, 
steamers, sailing dates, and hours of sailing . 

TICKET OFFICE— No. 4 New Montgomery street. (Palace Hotel.) 

G00DALL, PERKINS & CO., Gen. Agts. , 10 Market St., San Francisco 



[AHIC 




SS "Maripos a," Wednesday Aug. 10th, at 2 pm. 
Line to Coolgardle, Australia, and Capetown 
South Africa. 

J. D. SPREOKELS &BROS. CO. 



Agents, 114 Montgomery St. 
Market St.. San Francisco 



Freight offloe, 327 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Gould & Cu' Silver Mining Company. 

Assessment .' .r..;... No. 64 

Amount per Share ., 10 cents 

Levied ..".. ■ July 7, 1808 

-Delinquent in Offloe August 8, 1808 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock -••••: .August 29, 1898 

ALFRED K. DURBROW, Secretary, 

Office— Room 60, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




July 23 ir V 8 



FLOOD-TIDE.— arthuh w. h- baton- 

The tide came up as the sua went down, 

And the river was full to iis very brim. 
And a little boat crept up to the town 

I In the muddy wave in the morning dim — 
Bat the little boat with its reed-like oar, 

Brought news to the town that made it weep, 
And the people were never so gav as before, 

And they never slept so sound a sleep. 

News of ihe wreck that the brntman had seen, 
OfFin the bay. in a fierce, wild gale; 

Common enough such thing-* I ween, 

Yet the women cried, and the men were pale. 

Strange that a little boat could bring. 

Tidings to plunge a town in (ear.* ; 
Strange bow often some small thing 

May shatter and shiver the hope of years. 

* 'ti, none but the angel with silver wings, 

That broods o'er (he river and guards the town, 

Heeds half of the woe each evening bring.", 

As the tide comes up and (he sun goes down. 

RINGS— ANONYMOUS. 

I gave my Lady a moonstone ring, 
" It is for luck," they say, 
And I wish her well 
Sweet Isabel, 
I'nto her dying day. 

I gave my Dear a turquoise ring 
To match her bonny eyes. 

It is fair forsooth. 

But the eyes of youth 
Naught matches but the skies. 

I give my Sweetheart a crimson ring— 
A ruby deep and true. 
" Like a drop blood red 
From the heart," I said— 
" That will live or die tor you." 

But a sold band now can I give my Love, 
From that she will never part 

And the setting will be 

Of what is to me 
The rarest of gems— her Heart. 



SUNBEAMS. 

Bin Sergeant— Here, you, what do you mean by laughing 
at me? New Recruit (formerly of theeraek — th) — Why, 
old man, the man who doesn't know better than to weah a 
blue cap with red haih deserves ridicule, don't y' know. 
—Truth. 

"Funny world this," said the politician to the dentist. 
"How's that?" "You pulled Brown's tooth and he said 
that it quit aching at once. I pulled his nose and he swore 
that it ached worse than ever!" 

Native — Yaas, stranger, we hanged the wrong mar. 
STRANGER— Good heavens' What are you going to do 
about il? "Waal, we're in hopes we'll git the right one 
before night." 

He — I beg your pardon, but weren't we once engaged to 
be married? She— It's quite likely! I thought just now 
when I saw you that your face looked familiar! — Unsere 
Gesellschaft. 

"Py chiminninny! Ober we kin lick each odder nation in 
the worlt alreaty; don't it?" "We kin thot same, Dutchy. 
Begorra, Oi'm proud Oi'm an American."— Life. 

He — A man out west has patented a new style of whist- 
counters. She — What is the idea? He — They register 
the number of words spoken by each player. — Puck. 

Alice — Do you know that your papa once proposed to my 
mamma and was refused? Georgie — Yes; I've heard him 
brag about it a hundred times. — Richmond Times. 



t.s^r-- - 



Runner Resorts 




JlottM £1 pa$o d<( I^obl^s 



Under new management 



BEST CURATIVE 

AND BATHING 

WATERS 

IN AMERICA 

Cuisine First Class. 



appointments unsurpassed. Tub. plunre.mud 
and swimming baths In most powerful sul- 
phur waters In the world, trsuring quick 
and permanent cures for rheumatism, liver, 
kidney aod skin diseases. Magnificent re- 
treat for pleasure and recreatioD. Very hot 
sulphur Mud Bains, M2 F. ; Soda Springs. 
77 F.; main Sulphur Spring. 107 F. Terms 
$10 to $28 per week Two blocks from rail- 
road station. Fur her particulars apply to 
Traveler, ao Montgomery street, or 
Otto E. Nevbr, Prop., Paso Robles, Cal. 




jHoteis Qazad^ro aijd Elifn Qro\j%. mI k6 

IN BEAUTIFUL SONOMA COUNTY 

Gateway to Paradise, at terminus North 
Pacific Coast R. K. No staging ; only ten 
miles fr< m ocean; hotels short mile apart 
under one management ; best of attention, 
bowling riding, tennis, driving, fishing, 
shooting and outdoor swlmmlDg Open 
all year. Rates. $k to (14 per week. 
Further particulars, 
F. M. Child, Manager, Cazadero. 

ur at 504 Ke»rny treet, S. F., room iu. 
CALIFORNIA S IDEAL BIG TREE AND FAVORITE RESORT. 

{Pacific Congress uprinjps, 

SAN1A CRUZ MOUNTAINS, 
SANTA CLARA COUNTY. 

Remodeled and under new management. 

A new swimming tank has just been completed--175x80 ft. 

It takes O hours and J_ dollars to get thtre. 

J^HN S. MATHESON. Manager. 



Rubicon Springs, 

Oq Rubicon River, 10 miles from 

McKlnney's. LAKE TAHOE. 

Primitive, clean h» me ccoklng. 
New management; new furnishing; 
new stages; fine fishing and boating 
on river and lakes; the drive toilw 
springs is the most picturesque f>>r 
est drive inOalifomla. These springs 
are n^ied for medicinal value io stom- 
ach, liver, and kidney troubles, and 
relief for obesity. 

17 lo '.0 per week 

A. ABBOTT, Manager, 

The Discoverer of Ruhicrr. Sp'ings. 

CITY INDEX AND PURCHASER'S GUIDE 



RESTAURANTS. 
Maison Tortoni, French Rotisserle. Ill O'Farrell street. Private dining 

rooms and banquet ball S Constantlnl. Proprietor 
Poodle Oog Restaurant, 5 E cor Grant ave. and Bush st Private 

dining and banquet rooms Tel 429 AH BLANCO &B Hrun 
Bay State Oyster House and Grill Room, 15 Stockton street and 109 
O'Farrell street. N. M. Adler Proprietor. Telephone Main 5057. 

MEDICAL 
Or Hall, 59 McAllister St.. near Jones Diseases of women and children. 

POSTAGE STAMP DEALERS. 
Hawaiian Stamps a specialty. MAKINS & CO 506 Market street. 
Selections on approval: any place In world. W. F. GREANY, 827 Brannan 
The W. H. HoiHs SUmp Co., (Incorporated), 105 O'Farrell St.. S. F. 

BOILERMAKERS. 
P. F. Dundon's San Francisco Iron works, 314, 310, and 318 Main street. 
Iron Work of every description designed and constructed. 




Prir, prr (oflf. 10 CM*. 




Vxl.LUI. 



Annual SubtaifMOH, $4.00 



«AH »"RAHC|» eo 




<&VLliUtn&%totxtxszx. 



SAN FRANClsco, JlLY 30, IH98. 







Numler 5 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 23 ir^S 




FLOOD-TIDE.— arthur w. h- eatqn- 

The tide came up as the mm went down, 

And the river was full to lie very brim, 
And a little boat crept up to the town 



^unriER Resorts 



-^% -- 



Jtot<?l £1 pa^o d^ I^obl^s 



Under new management 



BEST CURATIVE 
AND BATHING 



appointments unsurpassed. Tub, plunre.mud 
and swimming baths In most powerful sul- 
phur waters in the world. Irsurlng quick 
and permanent cures for rheumatism, ltver, 
kidney and skin diseases. Magnificent re- 
treat for nleasure and recreation. Very hoi 




LIEUT. COL. CARRINGTON. 



Prirr ftrr tnftj. 10 Cents. 



Annual Siibsiri/.tion. $4.00 




Net 




(&> Villi fitufitXbbtxtx sjer. 




Vnl.UII. 



SAN FRANClsco. JCLY 30. 1898. 



Numlcr 5 



Printed and published ertry Satin day by the proprietor, rl.hlt MAJlBIti 1 T 
&H Kearny itreet. San Francitcc. Entered at San Eraneitco Pott- 
ofice at Second etatt Matter. 

Tkt oJUt of the .\Kl\s LETTER i/. Sew York t\ty it at Temple Onttrt; 
and at Chicago. 90S Boyce Building (Frank & MoT'ton. Eattern 
Jtepretentaiire) ichere information may be obtaintd regarding not 
tion and adcertijnntj ro'r.< 

THE Grand Jury et mmitlee on public morals has been 
inspecting St. Mary's, Berry and Bacon Place, and 
has determined to recommend that those disreputable 
quarters be fenced in by high gates. These little "places" 
have been a stench in the public nostrils for years, the 
occasion of innumerable police scandals, fountains of cor- 
ruption, and should be bricked up solidly and blutted off 
the map of the city. 

THE suggestion that President Kellogg, of the Univer- 
sity of California, at Berkeley, should be superceded 
by a younger and abler man is one that the Board of Re- 
gents cannot too quickly adopt. It has long been known 
that President Kellogg was not in touch with more 
advanced educational thought and methods, not in sympa- 
thy with the professors of that institution, and unpopular 
with the students. In the language of Regent Judge H. 
S. Foote, " It is time that a younger man should take his 
place." President Kellogg has neither personally nor 
professionally filled the requirements of president of a 
great educational institution, such as the University of 
California should be. 

ONE of the many nuisances to which housewives 
in San Francisco are subjected is the peddler. 
He is ubiquitous, strident as to voice, metallic as to 
cheek, insistent, insolent, and often dishonest. There 
is an ordinance of this city which offers protection 
to those who would avoid this human plague, but it 
is rarely invoked. It provides a fine for every 
offense, and the offense consists in ringing door bells 
where the legend "No peddlers wanted" is to be 
found. One day this week an outraged householder, 
who had suffered from the persistent assaults of one 
of these perambulating nuisances, had the fellow 
arrested and fined. A few lessons of this sort, coupled 
with a verbal warning to get out and stay out, will 
discourage the peddler, and citizens can then have 
peace. 

THE death roll among the soldiers on this peninsula 
wili from now on show a very material decrease. It 
is a shameful fact that the battle at Manila, and all the 
fatalities that took place on the transports that conveyed 
the troops from this city to the Philippines, multiplied by 
ten will not equal the number of soldiers who have died 
at Camp Merritt. If no other criticism upon the utter 
disregard for the comfort, effectiveness, and lives of the 
volunteers were at hand, this mournful fact would supply 
it. Had the Department at Washington not been moved 
by the vigorous appeals of local civil bodies, the burial 
service and the final salute over the graves of departing 
soldiers from Camp Merritt would soon become well-nigh 
continuous. [We were premature; for since the above 
lines were put in type it appears that one Col. Berry, of 
the Seventh California— it is a little difficult to classify the 
variety — has asked permission to remain at Camp Merritt. 
And it is noted with surprise that General Merriam quite 
readily consented. The reasons for such outrageous 
actions are not apparent; and in view of the expressed 
opinions of the people of San Francisco and the death roll 
at that stinking camp, Berry is a sadly decayed specimen 
of fruit.] 







ftT a secret meeting of the Board of Education last Wed- 
nesday evening, eighteen new teachers were chosen. 
The general impression was and is that the city had 
enough teachers. Secret meetings are always to be re- 
garded with suspicion; and when the San Francisco School 
Board locks the door, it requires an unusual grade of 
faith to keep one's apprehensive eyes off the City Treasury. 

WE all believe in saluting the departing and welcoming 
the coming soldiers; but there is such a thing as be- 
ing too noisily patriotic. The battery placed in the dome 
of the Call building is a thinly disguised agent of the devil. 
That popgun, operated by some misguided enthusiast, is 
an unmitigated nuisance. It attacks the nerves, awaken9 
all the cuss words in the vocabulary of Beelzebub, and 
promotes enthusiasm in precisely inverse ratio to its 
plagueful use. It is one of the guns thatoight to be 
spiked, without waiting to hear of the final surrender of 
the Dons. Let us have peace! 

THE valuable qualities of cold tea for the use of soldiers 
in tropical countries is very intelligently set forth in 
a late issue of the Medical Record. It is pointed out 
that there are no practical portable filters for soldiers to 
carry in the field, and that a canteen of cold tea with a 
few drops of lime juice added makes an excellent bever- 
age, marvelously refreshing. The Scientific American 
presents many illustrations of the value of cold tea in both 
torrid and frigid zones. Alcohol is a temporary and ex- 
pensive stimulant. Its last effects are bad; it leaves the 
system in a far worse condition than before its use. Tea 
is inexpensive, wholesome and oeneficial in its results. It 
ought to be generally adopted by our soldiers in Manila, 
Cuba and Porto Rico. 

SIXTY-FIVE Chinamen are held on the Pacific Mail 
dock and refused a landing because their certificates 
designate them as "traders" — which it was thought 
would be translated "merchants," and thus permit them to 
augment the Mongolian population of the city; but 
the reading of the exclusion act will not allow any 
such translation. It must not be inferred from this 
fact, however, that these Chinese will not ultimately be- 
come residents of San Francisco; because they now realize 
their mistake and have sent back home to substitute 
"merchants" certificates for those they have. Of course 
it will be an easy matter to prove that they are merchants 
when their revised certificates reach this city. It might 
be quite as well to parole them pending the arrival of their 
necessary papers. 

THE News Letter presents this week, free, a hand- 
some double-page half-tone picture of Camp Barrett, 
Oa'iland, together with individual photographs of Colonel 
Park Henshaw, Lieut. -Colonel Carrington and Captain 
Barnes. The four pages of views give an excellent gen- 
eral idea of camp life as the volunteers find it every day. 
Camp Barrett enjoys the enviable distinction of having 
officers in Col. Henshaw and Lieut-Col. Carrington who 
look upon soldiering as a very serious matter. It is not 
all play and no work. The discipline of the camp is very 
rigid. The men are made to understand their duties and 
they are compelled to perform them. The officers are 
popular with the Eighth California because they are just, 
as well as firm. The record of Camp Barrett, thanks to 
these hard-working officers, is one of which they may be 
proud, and the regiment may be depended upon to meet 
any fortune as becomes seasoned soldiers. Every view 
presented is full of life, and the pictures are worth many 
times the cost of the single copy of the News Letter. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 30, 1898. 



balance ought not to prove impossible of adjustment. As 
a matter of fact, the whole question resolves itself into 
one as to what we are willing to accept, and cry quits. If 
we decide to keep the Philippines, or any one or more of 
them, Spain has not it in her power to do anything but 
submit. In any event, therefore, peace ought not to be 
far off. Under recent precedents, the United States 
would be entitled to collect a money indemnity. It is well 
that the losing power should be required to pay for having 
made an unsuccessful war, because the more costly war is 
made the less likely it is to occur again. But S.)ain is 
bankrupt, and was before the war began. She has spent 
little or no money in resisting us, because she had none to 
spend. Any expenditures we have incurred have been for 
aggressive and not defensive purposes. As Spain has no 
money to pay, we cannot collect what she has not got. 
The colonies we shall strip her of must be our sufficient in- 
demnity. They will be a great loss to her, but whether 
they will be much of again to us remains to be seen. 

The Ensuing The outspoken, manly speech of Chairman 
Political McLaughlin before the Republican State 
Campaign. Central Committee the other day, ought 
to go far to remove the only danger that 
is looming up in connection with the political campaign of 
this year. It is so obvious that the party of the Adminis- 
tration will win, that the idea has gone out that a Repub- 
lican nomination is going to be about equal to an election. 
In this view of the situation, many shady candidates are 
engaged in a still hunt for office who are neither honest 
nor capable, and who, in an ordinary year, would stand no 
show of a popular election. The danger is that the next 
Republican Convention will be constituted in the interests 
of just such men. They are the active workers who are 
just now busy setting up the pins. But they may reckon 
without their hosts. California is not a good State in which 
to run "a yellow dog" in any year. Poor Mr. Estee, so 
frequently nominated, and so often defeated, found out how 
that was four years ago. He had so often lead forlorn 
hopes that he thought he ought for once to be given a 
nomination in a year when "a yellow dog — if a Republican" 
could be elected. Col. Burns procured him the Guber- 
natorial nomination, and he was the only man on his ticket 
who was defeated. That lesson ought not to be thrown 
away upon the over sanguioe party managers of the 
period. All other things being equal, the voters are not 
going to administer a slap in the face to the party con- 
ducting a most successful foreign war. But the political 
managers must not trade too far, or trust too much to 
this disposition of the voters. The nominee on the Demo- 
cratic side is likely to be a man who can in no sense be es- 
teemed a model candidate. At the same time, no "yellow 
dog," even though he be a Republican, is going to get 
away with James G. Maguire, who, as a demagogic catcher 
of votes, is a power that we may contemn, but cannot ig- 
nore. It is that fact which imparted wisdom and timeli- 
ness to Chairman McLaughlin's address to the State 
Central Committee. If bis warnings are heeded, the 
party's success this year will amount to a foregone conclu- 
sion. The managers owe it to the National Administra- 
tion to carry California. They can very easily make mis- 
takes that will cause the loss of the State. 

A Question of From personal observation we should 
Hunger and Help, judge destitution to be very preva- 
lent in San Francisco. Our streets 
swarm with hungry men. A well-fed man is apt to think 
a hungry man lazy. From careful notice we are inclined 
to believe that even energy may be reduced to hunger. 
We are told by housekeepers that thousands of girls are 
wanted for housework, but that American girls are op- 
posed to being "bossed." To be admitted to a house 
where the work is light and where she can associate on 
terms of equality with her betters is the nightmare of the 
American-born female "help." One of the first questions 
is: "What evening may I have the parlor?" If this is 
not sufficient to make a housekeeper pant after foreign 
"help," even as "the heart panteth after the water 
brooks," we know not whereof we talk. There are two 
things which too few Americans understand — why an 
American should be poor; why a poor American isn't "as 
good" as a rich American. 



WOMEN ON BATTLEFIELDS. 

1AM reminded by the noble work of Clara Barton, the 
Florence Nightingale of the present conflict, of a South- 
ern Samaritan of whom little is known, especially by North- 
erners. She was a Mrs. Irwin, and she had hospitals 
wherever the Confederate army of the Tennessee could be 
reached. This worthy woman died at Huntsville, Ala- 
bama, some fourteen years ago, after having established 
an asylum for orphans of Confederate soldiers. Another 
good woman was Mrs. Dr. Cliff (Union), the Confederate 
General Wharton being her brother, of Franklin, Tennes- 
see, who was so constantly on the alert to relieve Federal 
soldiers whenever Franklin was in Rebel possession, which 
was many times in 1861-4. In the same town lived the 
Misses Fannie and Octavia Courtney, members of a fine 
old Southern family, who marripd Federal officers and did 
much to relieve Union soldiers during the entire war, al- 
though they had brothers and cousins in the Confederate 
army, one of whom charged on the Union forces across the 
Courtney plantatinn in the famous battle of Franklin. In 
the same town was Mrs. Carter, a beautiful widow (Rebel), 
who assisted in relieving the sick and wounded of both 
sides immediately after the battle of Franklin. At Colum- 
bia, twelve miles beyond Franklin, lived Mrs. Major Wil- 
liam Polk, who was neutral, with a leaning toward the 
Union, her husband, a brother of President Polk, being a 
pronounced Union man. Mrs. President Polk of Nash- 
ville was neutral, with a leaning toward the Southern boys, 
and regret that the Secessonists brought about the war. 
She used often to fill a big basket with cakes and pies that 
she and her adopted daughter had made, and go out to the 
Rebel prisoners' camp and divide the toothsome things 
among the "boys" in gray as far as they could be made to 
go. Mrs. Aaron V. Brown, wife of a former Postmaster 
General under Pierce, and her two daughters, Cynthia 
and Narcissus, though tremendously Southern, used often 
to visit the Federal hospitals in Nashville. n. 0. t. 



FOOR Basil Heathcote. What a sad fate was his. 
Heathcote came here some years ago, and was 
promptly taken up by Mrs. Thornburgh, who introduced 
him about and gave Heathcote the chance to make friends. 
He married, and though he was always queer, and some 
people called him insane, he never developed insanity until 
about two years ago. His family in England are influ- 
ential people, and on bis mother's side he was related to 
Sir Michael Hicks-Beach. Some time ago he had a com- 
mon little fellow out to visit him, who was a brewer's son 
and wealthy, but despite the fact that there was money in 
his family they apparently took no interest in their kins- 
man. It devolved on his wife's people to look after him, 
which they did and saw that he was made comfortable in 
Napa until merciful death released him. 



TO-MORROW (Sunday) the Southern Pacific will run 
an excursion from this city to Santa Cruz, over its 
Coast Narrow Gauge Division, under the personal super- 
vision of Colonel Wm. H. ilenton. The price of round- 
trip tickets has been set at $2, which places the delightful 
trip within the reach of every one. There will be a grand 
concert on the beach at Santa Cruz and a mussel bake at 
two o'clock in the afternoon. That Colonel Menton has 
charge of the excursion is a guarantee that there will be 
abundant room for all who want to go, and that good or- 
der and quiet will be enjoyed throughout the entire trip. 
Take the 7:45 a. m. ferry at the foot of Market street. 
The train will leave Santa Cruz at 4:12 p. m. and reach the 
city at 8:05 p. m. 

Some things are fashionable a part of the year while olhers hold 
their place the year round. Of these last are J. F. Cutter and Argo- 
naut whiskies. The lover of good pure liquors drink these splendid 
brands every month in the year, and they are always refreshing, 
health-giving and palatable. E. Martin & Co., 411 Market street 
sole agents for the United States. 



Everybody is in favor of keeping Japanese laborers out of this 
countrv ; but the work of the skilled Japanese artists— the satsuma, 
ivory carvings, and rare art creations that are to be seen at Geo. T. 
Marsh ifcCo.'s, 626 Market street, under the Palace hotel, attract the 
attention of the lovers of this rare and quaint work. 



Indigestion dies where Jackson's Napa Soda lives. 



July 30. 1898. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



RACONTEURS OF THE CLUBS. 




THERE are two very distinct kinds of story. -oilers. 
The raconteur who wiil his history relate in the first 
person, he being the hero of every adventure, and per- 
forming as valorous deeds as the little tailor who slew uiue 
men at one blow, and being, of course, a very devil of a 

fellow in my lady's boudoir. 
Such men are usually dan- 
gerous. They are hard to 
escape. They are merciless 
in their agony to unlioi 
lies they feel throbbing within 
them. Fortunately such per- 
sons are growing rarer every 
day in the clubs. Now they 
are compelled to purchase 
their audience. The moment 
they cease to press the but- 
ton at frequent intervals, 
they find themselves address- 
ing empty benches. There 
are exceptions, among whom 
may be mentioned the Turkish Consul Georg • 
Hall. This gentleman has a rare fund of 
Oriental anecdotes, most of them garnered 
when Joe Redding and himself were to- 
gether in Egypt. The Khedive, it appears, 
is a most ridiculous fellow when basking in 
bis seraglio, and enjoys a risque story as 
much as a work-room full of milliners. He 
had invited the Sultan to help him entertain 
the California travelers, but the magnates 
found that the boot was on the other foot, 
and that Redding and Hall were entertain- 
ing them. But at last the Dight came 
when Redding's budget was exhausted, and 
Hall was running very short. Fortunately 
it occurred to Consul Hall to wire to that 
courtly man of fashion, Mr. Northrup 
Cowles, to send him over a gross of the 
latest Bohemian Club yarns, or else to come 
himself. Mr. Cowles came in person, accompanied 
by a pale person with a rubicund nose, whom he 
passed off as his valet. He arrived just in time to 
save the credit of the Californians. The Orientals 
were delighted. Cowles was inexhaustible, and 
when the parting hour arrived, Mr. Cowles was 
made a Knight of the Imperial Porous Plaster, be- 
cause he could draw anywhere. 

" How did you manage to get hold of all those 
good ripping yarns ? " inquired the Consul. 

" Did you notice that red-nosed man with me? " 

"Yes; your valet, is he not ? " 

"Not a bit of it. He is an old whiskey drummer, 

and he kept me in stock " 

* * * 

Dr. C. F. Buckley is a good raconteur. Physicians see 
much of the humorous, as well as the tragic side of life, 
and many a patient has forgotten his pain listening to Dr. 
Buckley's pleasing and amusing conversation. His stories 
are founded on experiences of himself and his medical 
brethren. There is always a Celtic snap to them. Nor 
are they labeled and put away like drugs in a dispensary, 
though indeed they are kept in such order that the doc- 
tor could put his hand on any one of them in the darkest 
night. A specimen of their crispness is as follows: The 
doctor had a patient suffering from a painful and danger- 
ous disease at the base of the spine. At last an opera- 
tion was agreed upon, and the poor fellow was placed face 
downward on the table, and the anesthetic administered. 
The keen knife slashed off the dangerous growth, and the 
patient recovered consciousness and shrieked with re- 
proachful tears in his eyes: 

"Oh, doctor 1 doctor ! you have pierced mp heart 1 " 

* * * 

Warren Payne, though almost invariably using the first 
person, is a very charming story-teller. Mr. Payne spent 
many of his early years in Europe, where he encountered, 
to be sure, many distinguished personages. Mr. Payne's 
resemblance to His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales 



has often led to amusing mistakes on the Continent. Hut 
an evidence of how close that resemblance is, is related by 

Mr. Payne: " I had spent the greater portion of the {lay 
in the Tower of London.'' said Mr. l'ayne, "and to get up 
an appetite for dinner and remove some painful impres- 
sions of Charles I and the murdered Princes, I took a walk 
in Kensington Gardens. I perceived on one of the benches 
an elderly lady, accompanied by some younger people, 
whose (ace seemed strangely familiar to me. She smiled 
at me as I approached, and said in a very musical voice: 

" Wales, my dear boy, I am delighted to see you. I 
thought you were off laying the corner stone of Whittle- 
buy's new church." 

i knew at once that I was in the presence of her august 
Majesty the Queen of Great Britain and Ireland. 

"Madam," I said, "you flatter me, but I have not the 
honor to be that estimable gentleman, your eldest son. I 
am simply Warren Payne, a Californian, at your service." 

Her Majesty shook my hand most cordially. "Excuse 
me, Mr. Payne," she said, " but I'm blowed if I ever saw 
any two people so much alike as you and Wales. Ta, ta; 
drop in and see me," and she laughed heartily, and so did 
the maids of honor. I had to go to Paris next day and so 
I never found the time to call," concludes Mr. Payne, "but 
the next trip I make to Europe I'll look the old lady up." 




THE TRANSPORT SHIPS. 



OUD rings the bugle through our land I 
-J Wide stands the Golden Gate I 
Swing out, ye ships, to farther seas, 

A-throb with living freight; 
The sun flings down a benison, 

The wave shows pomp and state 
As men in blue go forih, alas! 

While women weep and wait. 
Sail out, ye ships 1 War's storm hath broke 

And lashed our merchant main. 
War's bloody fangs gleam from afar 

As howl the dogs of Spain. 
Sail out I Strong arms must quell the strife 

Wnhstanding adverse fate: 
For men must meet the battles call 

While women weep and wait. 
Sail out, ye ships I A halo wrought 

Of loving prayers enfold. 
May Honor perch upon each prow, 

May Victory's tale be told 
Of those who— all Columbia's sons- 
War not for greed or hate; 
But men must strike for hearth and home 

While women weep and wait. 

Sail out, ye ships, in might to sweep 

Yon blot from Earth's fair face: 
A hand be-fouled with children's gore 

Doth beckon from the space. 
And fires, long fed with martyr's hearts, 

Doth God born wralh create. 
Just Retribution urges on 

Though women weep and wait. 

Clara Iza Price. 



The following clever sentiment accompanied the gift of a bottle of 
whiskey, by a prominent merchant of this city: "I send you some 
of the most wonderful whiskey that ever drove the skeleton from a 
feast or painted landscapes on the brain of man— the Jesse Moore 
'AA.' It is the mingled soul of wheat, corn, and rye. In it you will 
find the sunshine and shadow that chased each other o'er the bil- 
lowy fields; the breath of June; the carol of the lark; the dews of 
night; the wealth of summer's and autumn's rich content, all golden 
with imprisoned light. Drink it, and you will hear the voices of men 
and maidens singing the harvest home, mingled with the laughter of 
children. Drink it, and you will feel within your blood the startled 
dawns, the dreaming, tawny dusks of many perfect days. For 
twelve long years this liquid joy has been within the happy staves 
of oak, longing to touch the lips of man." 

The beneficial qualities of whole wheat bread— that is bread made 
from the entire wheat grain— is widely recognized. It is the most 
wholesome staff of life that is made. Swain's bakery, at 213 Sutter 
street, makes a specialty of this bread. The numerous wagons of the 
bakery deliver whole wheat bread promptly on order every morning 
to customers. Gluten bread is also made by Swain's, and like all , 
pastries etc., turned out at the bakery, is first class. All orders are 
promptly filled, and only the finest and purest articles of food are 
made. Swain's Bakery, 213 Sutter street. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 30, i8(,3. 




RFA5URC5 V#fD 



We obey no wand but pleasure's."— Tom Moore. 



I HAVE always deplored the war, but 
never more than when I think what 
havoc it has wrought in the Prawley 
season. A whole quarter of their time has been wasted 
on plays which would never have a chance of success in 
times of peace. The military play is no doubt a safe thing 
just now, but Mr. B'rawley is very venturesome to trade 
upon the bellicose state of public feeling to the extent of 
producing two such glaringly bad plays as Fori Frayne 
and A Gallant Surrender, 

A prodigality of melodramatic incidents does not neces- 
sarily make a dramatic play as Mr. Kidder seems to 
think. Mr. Kidder has had several previous experi- 
ences in playwriting and ought to know better. Con- 
sidering the number of tour de force episodes he has 
allowed himself, his play is marvellously dull. There are 
arid wastes of dry lines, a most distressing want of cohe- 
rence in the plot, — indeed, he seems to have no definite 
story to tell, — and there is a prodigious dearth of inter- 
esting people. Who cares what happens to any of them? 
Who really cares whether the hero is blown up by a tor- 
pedo or not, except that he is Mr. Bell? Jess, the seven- 
teen-year-old girl, who, when asked if she knows what love 
is, says she loves her "pop" and her "grand-pop," (it re- 
minds one of Ouida's Bebe, who at the age of sixteen thought 
her mother was a water lily) is a picturesque little per- 
son, and pathetic, too, and charmingly played by Miss 
May Buckley, but all the others rush on and off without 
leaving a trace of personality behind them. There are 
the usual Irish corporal, darky servant, puppy young- 
sters, and frantic females raging round the cannon's 
mouth, and interfering with military discipline, as they do 
in all the war plays, but they are as unreal as the ridicu- 
lous little fleet of ships which come jerking in at the end 
of the second act. It takes an unconscionably long time 
to find out what the play is all about, or whether it is 
about anything at all. There are a lot of detached 
scenes in the first act which don't lead anywhere, and are 
not amusing in themselves, — one especially tiresome one 
in which Mr. Charters as Lieutenant Hatch drills six 
privates in a kitchen, the only point of humor in the scene 
is in the fact that Lieutenant Hatch is very short, and 
thinks that everyone is laughing at his shortness, but as 
Mr. Charters is not uncommonly short the only point of 
humor is lost, and as he plays the scene with the most 
outrageous exaggeration, its tiresomeness is aggravated 
to the pitch of exasperation. 

* * * 

A good playwright begins his play in the middle, — 
some one (I forget who) says Ibsen begins his at the 
end, but Mr. Kidder has begun .1 Gallant Surrender a 
long time before the beginning. A good playwright 
also knows that you must be interested in his characters 
for their own personal sakes before you can be in- 
terested in anything that happens to them, and that 
nothing is dramatic in itself, just as nothing is funny 
in itself, but only in relation to its context. It is 
rot the fault of the actors, but of the author, that A Gal- 
lant Surrender is not more attractive, for the climaxes are 
not acting climaxes but mechanical ones. The only way 
to improve it would be to give it a more spectaculaV pro- 
duction, which would only make it a better show and not a 
better drama. It is Dot lack of ideas that Mr. Kidder 
suffers from,— but a lack of knowledge of how to handle 
them effectively, or else carelessness. Things keep shoot- 
ing off all the time, but they don't succeed in creating an 
atmosphere of danger because there is no sustained inter- 
est in the situation of the characters or in the characters 
themselves. The business of nailing the flag to the mast 
might be worked into a mostexciling scene if it bad any im- 
portant meaning, but as it is the effect is nothing. It is 
no doubt very interesting to see Mr. Hickman swarm up 
a flagstaff,— so it would be to see him climb a lamp post 
in the middle of Market street, and the interest would be 



just as dramatic as it is in the play. There is no particu- 
lar reason why the Ensign should nail the Hag up except 
from a personal desire to show off, there is no suspense on 
the stage while he does it, and nothing is gained by his 
doing it. It is merely an idea wasted. 
* * * 

A Gallant Surrender is not so consDicuously futile 
as General King's Fort Frayne; it hardly could he, and 
it offers more possible opportunities to the actors. 
Miss May Buckley has them nearly all, and uses them as 
cleverly as those who know her work expected she would. 
Miss Buckley is always natural, and she possesses the un- 
common gift of thinking for herself. The artistic detail of 
her performance is especially remarkable since she only 
saw the part for the first time four days before she played 
it. The simplicity and loyalty of the little creature Jess 
she brings out with a humor and pathos which are quite 
rare and delightful. Miss Buckley knows better than to 
utter hysterical ejaculations when she mounts the gun 
carriage and peers across the river through the field- 
glass, her quiet method is infinitely more telling and un- 
usual. Miss Madeline Bouton is gorgeous in green velvet, 
— I always feel as if I ought to speak of Miss Bouton's 
clothes first. She plays the part of a young widow, arch 
and lachrymose by turns, and as it is quite a conventional 
part, her extravagances don't matter as much as tbey 
did last week. Miss Campbell has a great deal to say and 
nothing to do, and she fills her unimportant situation 
gracefully. None of the men's parts are valuable. Mr. 
Charters' is the most conspicuous by his bad acting of it. 
Mr. Bell, who is such an excellent actor whenever be gets 
a chance to show his talent, has unusually little to do i<t 
a hero of melodrama, but his love-making ought to satisfy 
even the young ladies of the daily papers. Mr. Roberts 
also has his talent buried in a napkin, like his arm. Mr. 
Sam Edwards plays the darky part with "unction," and 
Messrs. Mainhall and Burke, as a Captain and Major, are 
quite satisfactory. Mr. Leary, too, is quite equal to the 
low comedy of McCann. Mr. Hickman has another perky 
part. It always distresses me to see Mr. Hickman in a 
perky part because he has the qualifications to play a cer- 
tain line of parts which hardly any actors have at the same 
time the appearance, temperament, and experience to 
play. The only part of the kind he has had here was in 
Po' Whitr Troth, 



The Alcazar audiences have been wallowing in luxurious 
grief over that ridiculous old play Eatt Li/nne. They 
seemed inclined to cynical levity during the first part of 
it, and laughed several times when they ought to have been 
seriously impressed, but the instant Lady Isabel came on 
in the black spectacles there wa< a raid on the pocket- 
handkerchiefs. One young lady, who had been scoffing in 
a very superior manner during the earlier scenes, was 
sobbing so loud before the end that she had to leave her 
seat twice because she disturbed the audience. A child's 
death is the safest business I know to affect a popular 
audience with. There are no such tear producers as 
/ i/r/t- Turn's Cabin and East Lynne. 

Miss Florence Roberts of course has the star part as Lady 
Isabel, and very skilfully does she apply her modern per- 
sonality to the old-fashioned part, acting with every ap- 
pearance of sincerity. Her personal charm will weather 
many strange situations. It is easier to imagine Lady Isa- 
bel's readiness to fly from Mr. Vroom's Archibald Carlyle 
than her readiness to fly to Mr. Lewis Morrison's Francis 
Levison. Mr. Morrison as a young buck is quite a novelty, 
and he wears a most remarkable wig. Barbara Hare 
was a horrid person really, but Miss Foster's Barbara 
Hare is an attractive young woman. Mr. George Foster 
Piatt plays the slight part of Richard Hare with his 
accustomed carefulness, and Mrs. Bates has one of her 
own parts as Cornelia, which she knows full well what to 
do with. 

Richelieu will be plaved at the Alcazar for the first four 
niyhts of next week, and for the rest of the week Camille. 
The press agent says: "Its story is well known, it is but 
the reiteration of that which was, is and will to come as 
long as the passions given birth at maturity -ontrol the 
brain of man beyond his power to reason. Camille calls 
for wardrobes of grandeur, and settings whereir the 



July 30. 1898. 



SAN FRAN( \VS LETTER. 



nobility revel.' -once Roberts will o| ,- ..,r>e plav 

Camille, and the following week she will appear si- Portia, 
and Mr. Lewis Morrison as Shylock. in what i- described 
as a "Henry Irving production'of T ■ H 

• • • 

The last week of the Tivoli's comic opera season has 
been devoted to Tkt Beggar Student, the most fan, 

oil Milloecker's operas. Mr. Pnil Branson played the 

title-role. Mr. Branson is by right a comedian, but he 
made a really commendable effort as a romantic tenor. 
and except when he forced his voice, which happened 
pretty often, sane his music with (,'ootl taste. Mi-s Carrie 
Roma was the Laura, and her pretty voice «.i- 
freshing as ever, and came out well in the concerted 
music. The part of Bronislava has more so-ibrettish 
chances than singing ones, which is unfortunate for Miss 
Crox. who is infinitely better as a singer than as a sou- 
brette. She sang well, as usual, whenever the chance 
occurred. Mr. Edwiu Stevens quite underrated the 
comedy of General Ollendorf. 

Next week comic opera gives way to grand, and on Mon- 
day Aida will be produced with the following cast: Aida, 
Marie Brandis; Amneris, Mary Linck; Priestess of Isis, 
Irene Mull; Radames, Rhys Thomas; Amonasro, Chevalier 
Maurice de Vries; Ramphis, Sig. G. S. Wanrell; King of 
Egypt. William H. West; A Messenger, H. A. Barkalew. 
Aida will alternate during the week with Lucia di Lam- 
\oor: Lucy Ashton, Anna Lichter; Alice, Irene Mull; 
Lord Edgar, of Ravenswood, Sig. Edgardo Zerni; Henry 
Ashton, Wm. Pruette; Sir Arthur Bucklaw, Arthur 
Boyce; Raymond, Wm. Schuester; Norman, William H. 
West. During the second week Faust will alternate with 
11 Trovutore, and Lohengrin is announced for the third week. 

* * * 

Acrobatics are the feature of the Orpheum this week. 
The Three Sisters Macarte do a sensational slack wire 
turn; two hang by the legs from trapezes playing mando- 
lin and guitar, and holding the ends of the wire in their 
teeth, while the third one treads it also playing a mando- 
lin, and many other strange and wonderful things they do. 
Wilton and Stack do an excellent horizontal bar turn. 
Joseph Hart and Carrie De Mar are received with great 
rapture in a new act called Dr. Chauncnjs Visit, written 
by Mr. Hart, the author of the famous Rosebud turn. 
The shadow dance with which it ends is novel and funny, 
and sure t> be copied. William H. Windon is billed as 
"The Eminent Tenor "; he is really a falsetto with a voice 
of no quality or power. He helps his turn out with more 
than the usual amount of cheap patriotism, and the sing- 
ing of the Blackstone Quartette, by whom he is supported, 
easily takes away the honors from him. The Three Angela 
Sisters are also new comers, and spend a cheerful time in 
singing and whistling. 

* * * 

Next Monday The Masked Ball will be produced at the 
Columbia, with Mr. Bell and Miss Buckley in the parts 
formerly played by Mr. Drew and Miss Adams. 

Wm. Gillette and Secret Service are announced to appear 
here shortly; also Miss Maude Adams in The Little Minis- 
ter"; also Henry Miller in Heartsease, Ogilvie's The Master, 
and as Compte de Candale in Sydney Grundy's adaptation 
of Dumas' A Marriage of Convenience. 

Ten thousand dollars is being spent on the New Comedy 
Theatre, (the old Bush-street Theatre), and Mr. M. B. 
Leavitt, the manager, intends shortly to open a very 
handsome house with all the most modern improvements 
in stage and auditorium. 



Emperor William never wears an evening dress suit, 

and there is an imperial regulation ordering that where- 
ever possible courtiers and guests shall wear the frock 
coat a 1' Anglais, otherwise the newly introduced court 
dress is de ligeur. 

Wanted —Pupils to learn negative re-touching. Thoroughly taught. 
First-class references; terms reasonable. Rjom63, third floor, 1170 Mar 
ket street. 



The famous old JESSE MOORE WHISKY is recommended by 
cians for family and medicinal use because it is pure. 

Sober up on Jackson's Napa Suda. 



physi- 




ixture 

I Smokinq Tobacco ## 



C| 1 ' T L J_ The "Gem " Theatre of the Coast. 

OlUmDia I neaXre, Friedlander, Gottlob&Co., Lessees 

Week of August 1st. The Frawley Company, presenting John 
Drew and Maude Adams' greatest success. 

THE MASKED BALL. 

By Bissou and Carre, as performed forover three hundred nights 

in New York. 

August 8th: An Enemy to the King. 



Alcazar Theatre. 



Fred Belasco, Lessee 
MarkThall, Manager. 



Next week. Two great plays. 
Lewis Morrison. 

Monday, September 1st 
Tuesday, September 2d 
Wednesday. September 3d 
Thursday. September 4th 



Phone Main 254. 
Beginning of f jurth month of 



Richel 



eu 



Friday, September 5th 

G< 1 1 Saturday Maiinee, September 6th 
3 fT\ I II e Saturda tf night, September 6th 
bundDy night, September 7th 
Our unapproachable prices prevailing. Seats for both productions 
now oa sale. Orchestra. 50 cents; dress circle, 35c. and 5Uc. ; 
balcony, 15c. and 25c. 

T< , I ' r\ l_i Mrs. Ernestine Kreling, 

I V 1 1 \J De ra I! O USe . Proprietor and Manager, 

Last nights of The Beggar Student. 

Next Monday, August 1st. Opening Grand Opera S-eason. 

Verdi's masterpiece, 

AIDA, 
Repeated on Wednesday, Friday, an3 Saturday eveniogs. 
Tuesday, Thursday, and t-unday evenings, also a special Satur- 
day matinee, Donizetti's favorite work, 

LUGIA DI LAMME*MOOR. 
Distinguished artists; enlarged chorus; careful productions; 
augmented o chestra. 

Popular prices, 25c. and 5 'o. Telephone Bush 9. 

N. h.— Matinee, reserved seats, 25c, 



1 San Francisco's Greatest Music Hall. 

rpneum. between Stockton and Powell streets. 



O'Farrell St., 



Week commencing Monday, August 1st. 

dAMES THORNTON, 

World's champion son? w riter; V«lbon & Anthetmine, Parisian 
dancers; direct from Europe, the Sisters Macarte, extraordinary 
exponents of equipoise; the Angela sisters, reflned musical ar- 
tistes; Wm. H. Windom. assisted by the f mous Blackstone 
Quartette; Wilton & Stack, horizontal bar performers; the favor- 
ite comedian, Joseph Hart, assisted by the clever Carrie De 
Mar is Mr. Hart's original sketch, "Dr. Chauncey's Visit;" 
Va m re, ' The Instrumental Man"; Gilbert & Goldie, new act. 
Matinees Wednesday, Saturday, and Supday. 
Reserved seats 25c; balcony iuc; opera chairs and box seats 50c. 

DR. BYRON W. HAINES 



14 Grant Avenue 
Rooms 16-17-18-19 



Dentist 



d. D. SULLIUAN 

Attorney- at- Law 
Rooms 34-38, 3d Floor Chronicle Building, San Francisco. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 30, is^s 




Hi 



THE tumultuous emotions that swell the male breast 
on the eve of becoming a happy father has been often 
described, but doubtless must be experienced in order to 
be fully appreciated. The hope always springs eternai in 
the about-to-be papa's heart that his first born shall be 
a boy, so that from a green old age he may behold a line of 
successors bearing his honored name into future genera- 
tions. An illustration of the futility of these masculine 
hopes recently met the gaze of the Looker On. Clem 
Horst, the wealthy hop man of this city, became aware of 
the interesting fact that coming events cast their shadows 
before, and his joy kDew no bounds, as in purple fancy he 
saw a fine healthy son dancing on his knee, or stimulating 
an uncomplaining papa's midnight pedestrian feet. He 
telegraphed the fact to his relatives East, and told his 
bosom friends in the city of the expected arrival. That 
nature sometimes perpetrates practical jokes never en- 
tered the gentleman's hopeful heart, and he was fre- 
quently seen about the stores furtively pricing hobby- 
horses, kites, and red wagons. 

It was over. He haunted the halls and lingered near 
the chamber door, waiting for the latest bulletin. It came. 
The Doctor approached him. 

" What is it ? " came from his lips. 

"Twins," replied the physician. 

'• What ! two bovs ! " 

"Girls." 

He fainted. After reviuing and bracing himself up, he 
rushed off to the telegraph offiee and sent the fallowing 
dispatch to his brother in the East. 

" Have opeued a jackpot with a pair of queens." 

At last accounts both father and twins were doing well. 

P. S. — Clem is to be congratulated on the fact that 
the Palace Hotel has reduced the price of champagne. 

* * * 

You cannot cnnxince John Washington that there is any 
virtue in that supposed emblem of gni d luck, a r -.obit's 
foot. He picked uponlhe street, the other day, one of 
these alleged charms and conscious 1hat he held in his pos- 
session an infallible panacea for ill-fortune, he sailed into 
the Press Club and challenged John Fi.uga to shake him 
for a drink. F.iuga did not know what he was running 
against, but he had no difficulty in beating his opponent, 
who, in a confusion of surprise and disgust," loudly declared 
that the dice were loaded. 

, Burning for revenge, Washington then tackled Billy 
Bunnrr and again he was obliged to affix his signature to 
one of those little cards which are so easily accumulated, 
and so annoying to have to liquidate. In rapid succession, 
John tempted fortune with the little ivory cubes, but was 
obliged to buy drinks f.ir half-a-dozen others. The word 
spread rapidly through the club that Washington was a 
good thing that day, and men stood in line about the bar, 
awaiting their turn to throw dice with "the rabbit foot 
man." None regretted the various speculations except 
the ordinarily good-natured official of the Health Depart- 
ment. 

' Blue phosphorus and yellow flames," exclaimed John, 
at length, employing really very much worse language 
than that. 'Do you know what I am going to do with 
that rabbit's foot? I shall send it to Ellert, (against 
whom he has a suit pending). He will never get a decision 
in the world! ' 

# # * 

There was great excitement along the water front 
when it was announced that Harbor Commissioner E. 
L. Colnon was about to go to sea, and before the mast, 
too. Everyone thought it was a joke at first, but when! 
upon investigation, it was found that the Stockton states- 
man had shipped as an able seaman, and had actually 
signed the papers of the ship R D. Rice in that c;> 
wharfingers and stevedores shook their heads and mur- 



mured an old comment about the bloom being on the rye. 

Several hurried consultations followed, and there were 
suggestions about injunctions, or restraining orders, or 
strait jackets, or anything which would keep the jovial 
Harbor Commissioner in port. And then some one discov- 
ered that Colnon wanted to take a little sea trip for his 
health; but that, although the Captain of the R. D. Rice 
was delighted to have Colnon as his guest to Nanaimo, he 
was not permitted to carry any one except members of 
the crew 

So, although Colnon signed as A. B., he will not be 
obliged to swab decks, or shin up masts, or reef sails, aud 
even his allowance of grog will be served him in the cabin. 

Now all his anxious water front friends say they under- 
stood the subterfuge all the time, and the way in which 
they all falling over each other in their anxiety to stand 
treat, is one of the most touching sights within view of the 

bilge water. 

* * * 

Now that the Midsummer Jinks of the Bohemian Club is 
again a matter of history, the members are criticizing the 
entertainment of last Saturday night in Meeker's Grove, 
with none too kindly reminiscences. Everyone is asking 
why a member should be chosen to sire the High Jinks who 
is as devoid of humor as a turnip, and the explunati .n that 
Donnie Graham has a pull with the Board of Directors 
is scarcely satisfactory and has caused a sudden revival 
of Ned Townsend's famous song concerning the governing 
body in Bohemia. 

If it had not been that Joe Redding came all the way 
from New York to take part in the jinks and that he ex- 
celled even himself, with clever seconds from Horace Piatt 
and General Barnes, the more formal part of the enter- 
tainment would have been a failure. 

The L w Jinks made up for many of the deficiencies 
earlier in the evening, Harry Dimond's asylum reproduc- 
tions being screamingly funny. 

One result of this summer's outdoor fro'ic is the organi- 
zation, in Bohemia, of a vigilance committee charged with 
the duty of detecting and exterminating loors and other 
tiresome animals whesc scute of humor is impossible of 
cultivation. 

* 9 * 

It is generally understood among the Republican leaders 
of the State that it will be necessaiy to put a strong, clean 
ticket in the field this fall, and the many of the would-be 
candidates are falling out of the struggle, Next to the 
head of the ticket the Supreme Court clerkship is attract- 
ing a great deal of attention, and there will be a sharp 
contest for the nomination. Wm. H. Reynolds is promi- 
nently nampd in connection with this office. He is a life- 
long Republican, and has peif >rmed valuable services for 
his party with which he has been prominently identified 
for the past twenty-five years. His personal popularity, 
undoubted high character, and clerical training admirably 
fit him for this position. He enjoys the confidence of all 
who know him, and holds strongly to the idea that all per- 
sons having business to transact in a public office are en- 
titled to prompt and courteous treatment. Reynolds will 
probably have a large percentage of the legal fraternity 
behind bim in his present fight, and hundreds of business 
men in other lines will be actively engaged in securing for 

him the nomination and election he seeks. 

* * # 

Society is aghast over the culmination of a series of 
eccentricities on the part of a young couple whose mar- 
riage, two years ago, was an event of that season. After 
a succession of astounding performances, given under the 
guise of originality in entertaining their many and varied 
guests, they recently capped the climax by auctioning off 
the contents of their pretty home, announcing that here- 
after they intended to board. 

There would have been nothing startling in that, if the 
list of articles which went under the hammer, had not in- 
cluded the beautiful wedding gifts of the bride. Matters 
were not improved by the fact that all of the young wife's 
friends attended the sale, and had the pleasure of seeing 
the presents they had donated, go under the hammer for 
about one-tenth of their value. One lady bought for five 
dollars a handsome piano lamp which she had two years 
agi herself given the bride and for which she had then 
paid sixty-five dollars. 



July 30 1898. 



SAN PRANCISCO NI-WS LETTER. 



" Not so that vou can hear me." gleefully replies 
Captain Billy Barnes when his friends Inquire if he 
exsses prero^ret over his loss of flesh, for "Mahomet's 
Mountain, "as his father calls him. has actually del 
twenty pounds of bis superfluous avoirdupois on the drill- 
ground of Camp Barrett. 

He sat in a little game, the other day. where one of the 
players was Winliekl Scott, the viticultural editor, and 
'.ary of the California Protective Association. After 
being ramped several times, with a considerable degree • •! 
severity. Scott grabbed the overhanging bell cord, con- 
nected with the bar, with the intention of ordering balm 
for his wounds. 

So vehement were his denunciations at his lack of success, 
that in pulling the bell, he pulled down the entire electric 
contrivance. Then he rushed angrily from the room, to 
give bis order directly. 

Barnes had been watching this entire performance with 
no little apprehension. He had never met Scott before 
and he felt some trepidation as to what the irascible young 
man would do next. 

" Great Scott!" exclaimed Billy, meaning nothing per- 
sonal by that remark, however. "That chap has a bad 
eye. I guess I'll skip." 

Seizing his chips, which he did not even take time to 
cash in, the valiant District Attorney, in corpulent haste, 
made good his escape before the innocent Scott could re- 
turn and explain. 

* * * 

On the Sunday before the Fourth of July, a burly Pres- 
byterian pastor, who is a huge embodiment of fun and the 
dryest of jokers, had a rise taken out of him, by one of the 
smallest boys of his Sunday School. The good minister 
had been pleading for contributions for a religio-patriotic 
purpose, and with such success that all the youngsters 
had responded with lavish generosity, even the little mites 
giving their mites. 

On sober reflection, however, some of the kids exper- 
ienced tho;e pangs which not infrequently follow a good 
deed which has been ill- considered. They felt that they 
had been cajoled into giving what they wished they had 
reserved for fire crackers and kindred purposes. 

Before the scholars were dismissed, the portly pastor 
delivered an address in which he modestly compared him- 
self to the Good Shepherd. Then he inquired what the 
Good Shepherd did with his flock. Mindful of the exper- 
ience which had just been h : s, and thinking more of his 
earthly than of the Heavenly Shepherd, a freckle-faced 
urchin whose heart was full, but whose pockets were 
empty, replied promptly: 

"He shears them!" 

* * * 

"When house-holders are away house-breakers will 
prey " is true just now in this city. Not a day passes that 
reports are not sent to the police of the operations of bur- 
glars and the consequent loss of* property. Not in're- 
quently the property stolen is very valuable. Some days 
ago two fine residences in the Western Addition were bur- 
glarized the same night. At one of the houses the bur- 
glars made a rich haul; at the other they got practically 
nothing. In the first instance the family had locked and 
bolted doors and windows. Once inside, the house-break- 
ers were ab'e at their leisure to ransack the premises 
from basement to garret, and they found silver services, 
plate and jewelry, amounting to a .large sum, which they 
carried away. In the other instance the family had taken 
the precaution to carry their personal property to the 
vaults of the California Safe Deposit and Trust Company, 
corner of California and Montgomery streets, where thieves 
cannot reach them. The exercise of common prudence was 
worth many dollars to one family, and the failure to use 
ordinary precaution cost the other almost an equal amount. 
The professional house-breakers go about the city and sys- 
tematically spot the homes that are closed up for a month 
or two, and at once give their attention to them. Ordi- 
nary bolts and locks and the vigilance of the police are 
really no protection against the clever house thieves now 
operating in the city. 

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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 30, 1898. 





The Works of William The Biographical Edition pre- 
Makepeace Thackeray, pared by Mrs. Anne Thackeray 
Ritchie, the surviving daughter 
of the Great Novelist, comprises additional material and 
hitherto unpublished letters, sketches and drawings de- 
rived from the author's original manuscript and note 
books. To lovers of Thackeray — and their name is legion 
— any new edition of his works would be greeted with more 
than passing interest, but in the present series of thir- 
teen volumes, now being issued by Harper Brothers and 
of which three, "Vanity Fair, '' "Pendennis," and "Yellow 
Plush Papers," are already before the public, the main 
interest centers in the fact that Mrs. Ritchie prefaces each 
volume with a succession of reminiscences, sketches and 
memories of her father's life and life work. After telling 
us that her father never wished for any biography of him- 
self to be written, and for that reason she has never at- 
tempted to write one, she adds: "It is my desire to mark 
down some of the truer chords to which his life work was 
set." Then very touchingly and tenderly and with sweet 
simplicity withal, does she present to us glimpses of 
Thackeray's childhood, his early school days at Cbiswick, 
when his mother was away in India, bis college days as an 
under-graduate at Cambridge, his travels in Germany, his 
house at Kensington where "Vanity Fair" was written, 
and by quotations from his own letters, and by bits from 
bis diary, she throws light on almost every period of her 
father's life. "I can remember," writes Mrs. Ritchie, 
"hearing him say 'Vanity Fair' is the best of my books. 
It has the best story and for another thing the title is 
such a good one, you couldn't have a better." On July 
2nd., 1848, Thackeray wrote to his mother: " 'Vanity Fair' 
is this instant done and I have worked so hard that I can 
scarcely hold a pen and say God bless my dearest mother." 
"Even now," adds Mrs. Ritchie, "after a life time, when 
three generations of readers have succeeded those who 
first read and praised 'Vanity Fair' that moment seems 
almost present again as one looks at the old letter on its 
half sheet of paper, and realizes what it must have been 
to the mother who read the letter, to my father who 
wrote it. Now and again in all the troubles and changes 
of life, I think he must have realized as only a few can do, 
the consciousness of repose, of well earned rest after effort, 
the immense happiness of good work achieved, the satis- 
faction of sympathy and recognition coming after the 
years ic which he had labored, alone and in silence as it 
were, and without any great success." That Mrs. Ritchie's 
additional chapters in the ten coming volumes will be 
eagerly looked for and warmly welcomed, is a foregone 
conclusion. To this loving daughter of a gifted father 
many an admirer of Thackeray will feel deeply indebted 
and truly grateful. 

The Biographical Edition. The works of William Makepeace Thackeray. 
With biographical introduction by his daughter, Anne Ritchie, in thir- 
teen volumes. Harper Bros.. N. Y. For sale by Doxey. Price $1.50 
per volume. 

Evelyn Innes, by George Moore. Published by D. Appleton 4 Com- 
pany, Sew York. 1896. 

George Moore verified his title to greatness when he 
wrote the concluding words of Evelyn Innes. Had he never 
written anything else, this book would have permanently 
rescued his name from forgetfulness. It is a book of 
tumultuous mental conflict; of merciless introspection, of 
definite and acute struggles between salvation and sin 
that have marked mankind since conscience first whispered 
and remorse pronounced the birth of right and wrong. 
It sets to Wagner music the moral metal of the heroine, 
fills her veins with the riotous sensual color of the great 
composer, and makes of her a psychological theme, at 
once super-sensitive, tense, brutal, tender— a paradox in 
skirts. But to the story : 

Evelyn Innes is the only child of " Mr." Innes, (the au- 
thor gives him no longer title), a musician of rare and con- 
scientious skill, whose wife, after winning wealth and fame 
on the operatic stage, loses her marvelous voice. All 



e fforts to restore it fail, and with broken fortune and 
little baby-girl, they settle in Dulwich, a Lon- 
don suburb, Mr. Innes becoming organist at 
St. Josephs in Southwark. Evelyn's mother 
dies, and she is left alone with her father, and 
is reared in an atmosphere rich with the fra- 
grance of old chants and missals. She in- 
herits her mother's voice and dutifully assists 
in earning a living by teaching music. She 
is devoted to her father, but with occasional 
yearnings to fty from her lowly surroundings, 
to go abroad, "become a great singer, and 
shine like a star in the world." Into the quiet 
and the unrest of this life comes destiny in 
the form of Sir Owen Asher, a wealthy Eng- 
lishman. He hears her voice, is charmed with 
its quality, urges the necessity of its cultiva- 
tion, and points out the glowing future. Eve- 
lyn falls in love with the refined and unscru- 
pulous Owen, accepts without serious disturb- 
ance or protest his proposal to go away and 
study music; and one day finds herself in 
Paris with him. Amidst the brilliant scenes 
of the French capital, the lavish expenditure 
of money, and the pursuit of her chosen art. 
conscience lies dormant. The sudden development of the 
sensual that is sometimes the complement of genius, and 
the other half of the artiste is complete. The situation 
does not appear unusual to her. The influence of home 
life becomes suddenly submerged and lost in the glitter of 
the moment. 

Six years speed away, and Evelyn, a great interpreter 
of Wagner music, returns to London. She seeks out her 
father in the old home and obtains his forgiveness. At 
her father's bouse she meets TJlick Dean. Her affection 
for Owen no longer magnifies his graces nor minimizes his 
faults. The world he told her of at first, the elegances 
that held her, have grown familiar neighbors now. 
Ulick is mysterious, dark, silent. He, too, is a musician, 
a composer, and a critic, and in the intoxication of his har- 
monious presence Owen is forgotten. Conscience long lost 
now reasserts itself with sufficient force to move her be- 
yond the line of theory, and Evelyn, whom Ulick and Owen 
each desires to marry, determines to renounce the stage 
and her lovers forever. She renews her allegiance to the 
Catholic Church, passes some days in the convent where 
she had enjoyed a retreat when she was an innocent girl; 
and the story ends when the doors of the convent closes 
upon her and Evelyn's carriage fares away to London. 

The story teaches no great moral, for one is uncertain 
whether the heroine remains true to her vows, or whether 
the turgid caprice of her volcanic nature reasserts itself. 
Nor does it picture in disenchanting colors the oft-told tale 
that the wages of sin is death. The book is great because 
of the consummate art of the writer and his marvelous 
illustration of the passion of Wagner's music set to the 
rythm of flaming eyes and wildly breaking hearts. There 
is noted here and there an indefiniteness and incoherence 
of motive; but his characters cling to the memory, for he 
trails them over his pages garlanded in beautiful speecb 
and luminous in splendid originality. All the complex 
emotions of the heroine's heart are told by this writer of 
purest English with a fidelity and a minuteness that give 
an added charm to his .work; and he leads one through 
the higher emotions to the contemplation of his characters. 
Fault will be found with " Evelyn Innes" because it is not 
a guileless book; but history would be incomplete and 
novels uninteresting if they did not paint true colors. 

Though Your Sins The story of this book is quite in keep- 
be as Scarlet. ing with its cover and its title, for it is 
a very lurid love story. The scene 
is laid in New York at the present time; the heroine has a 
crown of wondrous hair which she wears pompadour, rides 
a wheel, and has for a pet a young tiger called Mascot, 
and in many other ways is quite up to date. We are told 
that when she sits alone with her thoughts it is generally 
in a Moorish parlor, a miniature Alhambra, with polished 
floor, oriental rugs, low tables, bizarre ornaments, large 
palms on Cairo stands, and old lanterns of curious work- 
manship hanging over door and divan to dimly light the 



July 30, 1898. 



SAN FRANCISCO NBWS T.K'ITIiR. 



apartment. She writes verse which bears the Ella 
Wheeler Wilcox stamp, ami she is altogether a thoroughly 
flm-de-riiclc young woman. Holding from childhood vorV 
advanced and pronounced opinions about many things. 
Beatrice Gray, fascinating and impulsive, a creature of 
moods, and a warm-hearted but misunderstood girl, is 
rushed headlong to meet her fate in the shape of Marma- 
duke Brooks, a divorced man, who is pictured for us as 
"a type of perfect physical manhood." Beatrice knows 
that her church — she is an ardent Roman Catholic — does 
not recognize divorce, and unwilling to be married by a 
clergyman of another church, she determines to brave the 
condemnation of the world for the sake of the man she 
loves. To the sour ds of a waltz, "Love's Dream After 
the Ball," she is "pressed close to Brook's heart with a 
grip of iron," and he whispers fiercely in her ear, "We 
cannot be sure of the hereafter, but we can be sure of the 
row. Come with me to the end of the earth, and let ls 
find Heaven," — and she goes. To "make the punishment 
tit the crime," doubtless, sudden death and insanity form 
the sensational finale of this scarlet study of sin. That 
there are good passages in the book we do not deny, and 
we trust that some day Mrs. Giles will write something 
better worth reading. 

" Though Your Sins be as Scarier,*' by Marie Florence Giles. F. Tennyson 
Neely, publisher. London and New York. 

The Girl at With a trick that is peculiarly his own, 
Cobhurst. Mr. Stockton now and again sets the 
English-reading public of two hemispheres 
guessing some unguessable riddle. Who has ever solved 
the Lady and the Tiger question ? As a successful 
promoter of mental calisthenics Mr. Stockton does not 
weary of well doing, and in his latest novel, "The Girl at 
Cobhurst," be gives his readers a new evidence of his versa- 
tility in this line, and presents to them no easy task. There 
are girls galore at Cobhurst. There is the old maid, the 
young maid, the maid that is rich, the maid that is poor, 
and the maid that is a cordon-bleu. Naturally, the ques- 
tion is, which one of all these girls is the girl referred to. 
We may for the nonce lose sight of the hero and the love 
story, of the dear old doctor and his devoted wife, of Mike 
and Mr. Ames, of Mrs. Browning and the barn, of every- 
thing and everybody, but to the very last page of the 
story we are deeply puzzled as to just which girl the title 
is meant to designate. When we finally close the book it 
is with a big mental interrogation point. We think about 
it all day, dream about it all night, and at last awaken to 
the realization of the fact that Mr. Stockton is very skill- 
fully playing another little trick, so — with a laugh — we 
decide " to give it up." Mr. Stockton is a farceur, and an 
artist, as well as a humorist. He not only laughs, but 
makes the world laugh with him. 

"The Girl at Cobhurst," by Frank R. Stockton. Charles Scribner's Sons, 
New York. For sale by Doxey. 

Shifting Sands. This is not a "detective story properly 
speaking, but something very akin to 
one, and the plot is quite in Anna Katherine Green's line. 
A country constable aids in the search for a thief who has 
stolen a tin box, supposed to contain a treasure, value un- 
known. The mystery is deep and apparently unsolvable. 
There are no end of complications and adventures, a love 
story — or two rather — mix in with the wild quest and 
everybody is suspected as having something to do with 
the purloining of the box. Ultimately the guilty person 
is discovered, and the treasure, a hundred thousand 
dollars in Government bonds, is returned to its rightful 
owner much to the satisfaction of all concerned. As for 
the four young lovers, we leave them at the end of the 
book thinking "the world wonderfully bright in spite of 
thefts and suspicions and disappointments." 

Shitting Sands, by Frederick R. Burton. Eand, McNally & Co., publishers. 

Parties who have cash to pay can get some wonderful bargains in 
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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 30, 1898. 



According to all accounts the Redington 
Another Cold Quicksilver mines promotion scheme has 
Turn Down, fallen flat in London, adding another to 
an already long list of recent fiascos of 
the kind. The failure in this case was caused by over capi- 
talization, due as usual'to the grasping propensity of the 
London promoters. This class of operators have proved 
a curse to our mine owners, many of whom are ignorant 
enough to imagine that monied people in Great Britain 
are foolish enough to bite at aDy bait. The Redington, 
like scores of other mines taken over to London, is a prop- 
erty which would pay as a moderate investment of cap- 
ital, and make very good returns at that. The promoters, 
however, only desire to use the mine as a means of clean- 
ing up a fortune at a single stroke, and the investors are 
left to look out for themselves sfter that. Experience 
will teach our people in time that these men are not to be 
trusted in any way. The News Letter has tried to im- 
press this upon their minds for years past, and it is some 
satisfaction to recognize that its efforts have not been 
altogether futile in disrupting schemes of the kind which 
were tantamount to robbery. Many of the sharks have 
been given their quietus, with little fear of any trouble 
from them in the future. As a rule it is only necessary to 
give a rascal rope enough and he will haug himself, and in 
(|uite a number of cases this old axiom has been fully ex- 
emplified. Where are all the gentlemen with their millions 
who stormed the town a few years ago, and befogged many 
level-headed mining men with pretentious statements of 
business connections and influential relations to the Roths- 
childs? They were one and all weighed in the balance 
and found wanting, much to the surprise and disgust 
doubtless of a good many led awa}' by the idea that fine 
'eathers make fine birds. Not one of these men ever in- 
vented a dollar in the State of their own or of anybody 
else. They were simply bunco men on the look-out for 
easy game, of which there was no lack in the Californian 
preserves. The remembrance of the association with 
these slippery individuals, in face of repeated warnings, 
may not be pleasant for the untraveled and consequently 
unsophisticated class which furnished the returns, but 
the atmosphere is purer all the same after an experience 
bitter yet salutary. 

The law suit mentioned in these col 
A Big Mining Fight umns some weeks ago, as possible be- 
Commenced. tween the Gerrymander Mining Com- 

pany, of Tuolumne, and its neighbor, 
the Golden Gate, has materialized. The former claims 
that its lower levels have been invaded and their ore ex- 
tracted, and damages are asked in a large sum. What 
the amount will be can of course only be determined by a 
survey, and this has been ordered by the Superior Court 
of Calaveras County, when the case came up before Judge 
Gottschalk at San Andreas on Saturday last. This bids 
fair to be ODe of the cqusca ctlebrn in the mining annals of 
the State, owing to the standing of both companies and 
the fact that all the parlies are rich enough to see that 
they get their dues. From the map of Surveyor Barton, 
who stands high in his profession, the Golden" Gate, who 
employed him, are in pretty close quarters, if he is not in 
error, and this is unlikely. This company has already 
. spent a fortune in litigation, which lasted for years. Mr. 
J. Ross Browne has been retained by the Gerrymander peo- 
ple as an engineer to survey the ground already gone 
over by Mr. Barton. 

British capitalists are already beginning 
Gold in the to descend upon China, and the Philippines 
Philippines, have just been placed upon the London 
promoters' list, in full belief, no doubt, that 
the Stars and Stripes will go up there to stay. Nearlv all 
the more important industries in Cuba were bought up in 
the same quarter the minute it became apparent that war 
would be declared by the American Government against 
Spain. Now comes the Anglo-Chinese Trading and Finan- 
cial Corporation Limited, with a capital of $1,0110,0011, with 
the declared purpose of investment in the Philippines. 
There is an old saying that British trade follows the Hag, 



The Results of 
Mismanagement. 



and it begins to look now as though it intended to follow 
the American colors as well. An Irish peer, Lord Ath- 
lumney, a new man in the business, is at the head of the 
corporation, which can only be considered as an entering 
wedge, the forerunner of others in the field. It is time 
our own people were awaking to the opportunities which 
will soon offer for lucrative investment in this quarter. The 
wealth of the Philippines has never been developed, and 
many of the principal islands in the Archipelago are to-day 
a veritable terra-incognita. The Spaniards have never 
branched out in the sense of exploring the territory under 
their control, and few whites have ever visited the inter- 
ior of islands which are known to be rich in natural pro- 
ducts of the most varied description. There is Mindanao, 
for example; gold is known to exist there in large quanti- 
ties. Its mines are still virgin, outside of the placers, which 
have furnished the natives with personal ornaments of the 
precious metal. The Spaniards never had much desire to 
do business in this quarter, confining themselves to Luzon, 
where the inhabitants are less barbarously inclined; and 
foreigners never cared to take chances, handicapped by 
possibilities of ill-treatment by the Government had they 
succeeded in acquiring enough wealth to be worth robbing. 
Everything will be changed soon, and in time another rush 
will be made for new gold fields which may eclipse any 
that have yet taken place from the days of Ballarat down 
to the Klondike. Pacific Coast miners should not be last 
in the race. 

The Scottish Critic must have woefully 
m'sconstrued our article on the Dia- 
mond Hill Gold Mines when it lays 
stress upon the necessity for special 
supervision of American mine managers. As a matter of 
fact, they are apt to get a much squarer deal from the 
men on this side than they are from their own people, as 
events have proven within the past ten years. The blame 
for the disaster which overtook the Diamond Hill Com- 
pany can be laid solely to the negligence of the Board of 
Directors, who, by attention to their duties, had they 
understood them, could have placed matters beyond the 
power of others to work them wrong. To the credit of 
the Scotchmen, be it said that they are fortunate in having 
such representatives as Messrs. Gow and Wingate on the 
Pacific Coast. They are exceptions to the rule, however, 
taking the average British mine managers as a whole. 
We do not think we erred in saying that some of the old 
Directors of the Jumper were on the Board of the Diamond 
Hill. It is a good motto in mining to look before leaping. 
It saves trouble in the long run. Whatever credit was 
given the manager of the Jumper, in the article to which 
reference is made, is only due him, and we wish as 
much could be said of more of his class from beyond the 
sea. It will be hoped that the new Board men'ioned will 
succeed in pulling out the money already sunk in the Dia- 
mond Hill. It is hardly fair, however, to expect a mine to 
reimburse thousands of dollars misspent in the way of 
commissions which should never have been paid. 

The work of draining the Comstock 

Draining the Lode from the 1,750-level down to the 

Comstock Lode, lowest level is under consideration. It 

is something which should be done in 
the interests of mining the world over. The famous min- 
eral deposit in this locality is the greatest ever discovered. 
It will go down in history for ages to come. There is no 
certainty that its vast resources have beer developed by 
the gophering which has gone on at different points during 
the past twenty-five years. Everything tends to prove 
to the contrary. The work now proposed is of a magni- 
tude which the companies themselves dare not cope with 
under existing financial conditions. But this is no reason 
that an imperative duty should be neglected or abandoned. 
If the State of Nevada does not recognize the importance 
of lending its support to the work as a matter of self- 
interest if nothing else, then it will be proper to solicit 
Federal aid. To make a commencement some one or 
other of the big pump- builders of America might possibly 
be induced 10 put in the necessary plant, under a contract 
with the companies guaranteeing payment in the future, 
when ore extraction begins. It is well known that a rich 
body of ore exists in Belcher, and within six weeks this 
should be reached, ready for extraction and reduction. 



Julv 30 t8oV 



SAX PRANCISCO M-WS I.KTTKR. 




"Heir the Crier !'" "Whil -.he devil »rt thou!' 
"Oneth»l will pI»t thedeMl.slr. with jon." 



^ 



ft CERTAIN newly-made widower is evidently taking 
bis bereavement to heart. He gives little dinners to 
select friends, and as his dinners are attended by young 
people there is a gaiety about these euter'- 
tainments which would not be found among 
an assemblage of older people, but even 
the gayest of gay girls think "it quite 
odd, don't you know," wheu the ancient 
host begins trying to kiss the guests, and 
retreats into impenetrable sulkiness when 
a box on the ear is offered for his insolence. 
The same old ruffian intends to graciously 
project his obese person upon the amiable 
off-spring of the whistling lady, but his only 
regret was that the girls did not come up 
to his standard of feminine perfection, as 
there was not enoughroundness in their 




4*W''- 



make-up. 

THEY have been terribly gay down at Santa 
Cruz lately. The women have been at their wits' 
end to amuse themselves, and so the small boys in 
Santa Crnz town have developed into. alarming and 
precociously wicked flirts. By way of pulling into 
shade San Rafael, and incidentally being English, a 
hare and hound sort of affair was given. Every old 
skate in Santa Cruz was hired, and women were 
hoisted on to their saddles by derricks, or men who 
were about as used to placing women in a saddle 
as a derrick is. The gay blonde was much in evidence, 
and after the hare had trotted down one road and up 
another, the hounds followed in that quiet and 
leisurely procession which made the rustic believe they 
\}f were on a funeral, but the corpse was too speedy for 
)y. > them. For two days after the drug stores did a lively 
vllik tr ade in salves, and" like Mr. Malcolm G-arnett, when he 
takes some of his extraordinary rides, meals were de- 
voured standing. 

MANILA promises to be quite gay this winter, and it 
would not be a bad idea to have a good hotel there. 
Already some ladies whose gallant lords are doing duty in 
Cavite Bay have departed for Hongkong, so as to be near 
the scene of their husband's future conquests, and now 
comes the news that Mrs. Randolph Miner, who led the 
society of Los Angeles, will leave shortly for Manila "to 
join her gallant husband." What "gallantry" Miner has 
s'uown the mind of the average citizen really cannot con- 
ceive. He went down to Manila as some sort of an officer 
on board a grimy collier. Of course, nowadays, even a 
man in a cook's galley is a hero — therefore Mr. Randolph 
Miner, however lowly the place he fills, is doing a gallant 
service. 

S WOMAN, an ex-employe of the Woman's Exchange, 
through the medium of a certain paper, has been dis- 
playing her store of venom against the ladies of the asso- 
ciation, and the ladies do not intend to sit calmly under her 
assaults. This woman will have to make good her 
malicious statements in court, as H. H. Highton intends 
to prosecute her for defamation of character. The ladies 
of the Woman's Exchange do not care to enter into a jews- 
paper controversy with their late cook. This woman, it 
may be parenthetically remarked, sold certain recipes to a 
firm which recipes were the private property of the 
managers of the association. These dealings had not the 
perfect ear marks of honesty. 

CONGRESSMAN Maguire is busily engaged in securing 
endorsements from all the factions in and out of his 
party. He evidently realizes that the early bird does not 
always get the worm — particularly when the worm has 
had fair warning that the biped is of the Maguire type. 



TBB 
up 



ESE be evil days which have fallen 




Solomon Kampe who with others was 
kicked out of the noble position of Grand 
Juror. While Grand Juror Mr. Kampe 
held some power and he made that 
power felt; now not being a grand juror 
but simply Kampe, bis haughtiness has vanished and he is 
as sinuous and as slippery as a snake. One of the State 
departments has issued an order informing the employes 
that if they raise money on their warrants with a pro- 
fessional money lender discharge will follow. "MeinGott, 
mein Gott," cried Kampe, "how can men be so vicked and 
gruel. The poor, poor men how can they leeve when they 
cand go to Kampe?" Thereupon the absorptive Kampe 
went to the chief and begged him to rescind the order: 
"Vy Mr. Bresident I do doze beoble goot, I do, I do. I 
don'd let em have, Mr. Bresident, more than a vew dollars 
at a Hime and I keep em going. Now Mr. Bresident they 
will get their money all together, and they'll go and have a 

h 1 of a dime, Mr. Bresident, and you will suffer. Oh 

blease Mr. Bresident ghange your mind." Mr. President 
did not, and as Solomon Kampe left the President's room 
he was heard to say: "Ach if I were Grand Juror he'd 
change his mind bre'.ty soon, he would." What this 
official should have done was to have kicked Kampe down 
the stairs. 

HERE is a newly-originated fad that should be taken to 
the new ferry depot and unceremoniously dropped 
overboard. A number of women and men go around 
daily to the different hospitals, and there, with open 
mouths and unintelligent countenances, gape at the 
doctors and the apparatus of a receiving hospital. They 
lounge in the private rooms while waiting for a case. In 
other words they are nuisances, and though invited by a 
doctor, it need not be explained why these particular 
doctors do the inviting other than for purposes of cheap 
self advertisement. Now, these hospitals are maintained 
by the city and at the expense of the tax-payer. What 
unfortunate man or woman wants, when being treated, to 
be gaped at by an idle mob of men and women who are 
pretending to learn to be nurses? Last Wednesday a man 
shot his wife twice, and the woman was taken to the 
Harbor Hospital. A mob of these men and women 
crowded into the operating room, got in the way of the 
attending physicians. The doctor who invited this mob 
was not on duty when he should have been, and the other 
doctors were much incensed at the crowd in the operating 
room. The woman had to be undressed and the men had 
to be ordered out of the room. They did not even have 
decency to leave. 

MRS. Admiral Miller suddenly discovered that she was 
not quite so important a personage in the eyes of the 
world, and also in the orbs that are attached to the mem- 
bers of the Customs as she imagined. When Mrs. Admiral 
Miller arrived in port she believed that her name alone 
would be sufficient to have her trunks pass the Customs 
House. Mr. St. John, who is ever courteous, graciously 
examined her hand valises and suggested that she come 
down later and have her trunks viseed. Mrs. Miller sent 
down her husband's negro valet with the keys, who in a 
lordly-manner ordered the officials "to hurry up." Mrs. 
Miller received the full benefit of the law. Everything 
dutiable was put down, and, when the news reached her 
ears, she was in a condition bordering on hysterics. A 
Lieutenant who acts as secretary went to see Mr. St. 
John. Mr. St. John explained that he was not in the 
habit of taking declarations or orders from negroes if the 
members of the navy were, even though the negro was an 
Admiral's valet. Back flew the Lieutenant to Mrs. Ad- 
miral, and down came Mrs. Admiral to the Custom House 
to call upon Mr. St. John. 

MR. JOHN QUINCY ADAMS left for Dawson last 
week, and intends to take his summer vacation by a 
walk over the Valdes Pass. He will undoubtedly return 
with a huge fortune. All men do who go to Dawson. He 
is taking an assortment of literature and among his works 
was a bible. "Heavens Adams," said a casual friend. 
"What on earth do you want a bible for. You never read 
it." "No that's a fact," replied Adams, "but you know 
there is sure to be an argument over some passage and 
I'll have the cinch on them if it ever gets down to betting." 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 30, 1898. 




MOTHER LOVE — fall hall gazette- 



IF I might build a palace fair 
With every joy of soul and sense, 
And set my heart as sentry there 

To guard your happy innocence; 
If I might plant a hedge too strong 

For creeping sorrows to writhe through, 
And find my whole life not too long 

To give, to make your hedge for you. 
If I could teach the laden air 

To bear no sounds that were not sweet, 
Could teach the earth that only fair. 

Untrodden flowers deserve your feet, 
Would I not tear the secret scroll 

Where all your griefs lie closely curled, 
And give your little hand control 

Of all the joys of all the world? 
But, ah, I have no skill to raise 

The palace, teach the hedge to grow ; 
The common airs blow through your days, 

By common paths your dear feet go; 
And you must twine, of common flowers, 

The wreath that happy women wear, 
And bear, in desolate darkened hours, 

The common griefs that all men bear. 
The pinions of my love I fold, 

Your little shoulders close about; 
Ah, could my love keep out the cold, 

Or shut the creeping sorrows out ! 
Kough paths will tire your darling feet, 

liray skies will weep your tears above, 
While round your life, in torment beat. 

The impotent wings of mother love! 

A LITTLE BIT OF A BOY— frank stanton. 

There was never a smile in a weary while, 

And never a gleam of joy, 
Till his eyes of light made the whole world bright— 

A little bit of a boy ! 

He came one day when the world was May, 

And thrilling with life and joy. 
And with all the roses he seemed to play, 

A little bit of a boy 1 
But be played his part with a human heart, 

And time can never destroy, 
The memory sweet of the pattering feet, 

Of that little bit of a boy ! 

We had wondered how he could play all day 

With never a gleam of rest; 
But once he crept in the dark and slept 

Still on his mother's breast. 
***** 
There was never a smile in a weary while, 

And never a gleam of joy, 
Bat the world seems dim since we dreamed of him, 

A little bit of a boy ! 

TO MY BABY.— claka cowell in oodey's, july isth. 

What means this yearning o'er thee, precious one? 

Think not it is my lips 1 press to thine; 
It is my heart— my soul— the central sun; 

< if earnest being, moving forth to shine 
In benedictions that do rise and run 

In baste to bless thee. Yet— do rains combine 
With showered sunbeams?— Shadowy as a nun 

Steals side by side with joy some doubt of mine; 
If life should pass a poignant cup to thee, 

Could'st thou grow sweet on bitter nourishment? 
Should only folly flourish in thy day, 
Could'st thou choose wisdom and obscurity? 
Should men grow warlike, fierce and violent, 

Co uldst thou in peace pursue love's gentle wav ! 

THE SINGER —lloyo kifflin, in the slofes of helicon 

Sorrow has marred her face— how much I 
And dimmed her wondrous eyes ; 

But, oh, her Voice I— ber voice it could not touch- 
That was of Paradise. 



BANKING. 
Bank of British Columbia. { &5^ 1 $ h s£i ! 8£S5? 1 8B: 

Capital Paid Up 13,000,000 Reserve Fund I 500,000 

HEAD OFFICE. 60 Lombard STREET, London 

Branches— Vlotorla, Vancouver, New Westminster, Kamloops, Nan- 
iamo, Nelson, Sandon, and Kaslo, British Columbia; Portland, Oregon 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened sub- 
ject to Check, and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted 
available in all parts of the world. Approved Bills discounted and ad- 
vances made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates 
upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents, as follows: 

New York— Merchants' Bank of Canada ; Chicago— First National Bank ; 
Liverpool— North and South Wales Bank; Scotland— British Linen 
Company; Ireland — Bank of Ireland; Mexico — London Bank of Mexico; 
South America— London Bank of Mexico and South America; China and 
Japan— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China; Australia and 
New Zealand— Bank of Australasia and Commercial Banking Company oi 
Sydney, Ld ; Demerara and Trinidad (West Indies)— Colonial Bank. 

Also on Dawson City, Yukon District, arrangements having been made 
with the Canadian Bank of Commerce whereby it is prepared to issue 
drafts and Letters of Credit on that Bank at above point, and transaet 
other banking business. Terms upon application. 

San Francisco Savings Union. 

532 California Street. 

Deposits. Julyl. 1608 $23,356,130 Reserve Fund 1182,009 

Paid-Up Capital 1,000,000 Contingent Fund . 435,516 

E. B. POND, President W. C. B. DeFREMERY, Vice-President 

LOVELL WHITE, Cashier. 

Directors: George W. Beaver, Thomas Magee, W. C. B deFremery, Al- 
bert Miller, Robert Watt, George C. Boardman, Daniel E. Martin, George 
Tashelra, E. B. Pond. 

Loans upon San Francisco and Oakland Real Estate, and Farms and 
Farming Lands In the Country. 

Receives Deposits. Country remittances may be made in checks payable 
in San Francisco, Post Offloe or Wells Fargo & Co.'s Money Orders, of coin 
by Express, but the responsibility of this bank commences only with the 
receipt cf the money. 

No charge is made for pass-book or entrance fee. 

Office Hours : 9 a.m. to 3 p. m , and Saturday evenings, for receipt of de- 
posits only, 6:30 to 8 o'clock. 

Bank of California, San FranGisGO. 

Capital and Surplus, t6.000.000 

WILLIAM ALVORD President I CHARLES R. BISHOP.. Vioe-pres't 

ALLEN M. CLAY Secretary THOMAS BROWN Cashier 

S. Prentiss Smith... Ass't Cashier 1 1, F. Mooxton 2d Ass 't Cashier 

CORRESPONDENTS. 
New York— Messrs. Laidlaw & Co.; the Bank of New York, N. B. A. 
Baltimore— The National Exchange Bank. Boston— The Tremont Na- 
tional Bank; Chicago— Illinois Trust and Savings Bank: Union National 
Bank. Philadelphia— Philadelphia National Bank. St. Louis— Boat- 
man's Bank. Virginia Citt (Nev.)— Agenoy of The Bank of California. 
London— Messrs. N. M.Rothschild & Sons; Paris— Messrs. de Roths- 
child Freres. Berlin— Direction der Disconto Gesellscbaft. China, 
Japan and East Indies— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China. 
Australia and New Zealand— The Union Bank of Australia, Ltd., and 
Bank of New Zealand. 
Letters of Credit Issued available in all parts of the world. 

The San Francisco National Bank, 

Southeast Corner of Pine and Sansome streets, S. F. 
Jas. K. Wilson, President. E. A. Bkugciere, Vice-President. 

Lewis I. Cowgill, Cashier. F. W. Wolfe, Assistant Cashier. 

Capital $500,000 

Directobs: Jas. K. Wilson, D. J. Staples, Wm. Pierce Johnson, Geo. 
A. Pope, E. A. Bruguiere, Ed. G. Lukens. Charles C. Judson. 

Agents: New York— Hanover National Bank, Chase National Bank; 
Boston— National Bank of the Commonwealth. Philadelphia— Drexel & 
Co. Chicago— Continental National Bank. St. Louis— The Mechanics' 
Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. London— Brown Shipley & 
Co. Paris—Morgan, Harjes & Co. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 

33 Post Street, below Kearny, Mechanics' Institute Building. 

Guaranteed Capital 11,000,000 Paid-Up Capital 1300,000 

JAMES D. PHELAN. President. S. G. MURPHY, Vice-President. 
GEO. A. STORY, Cashier. JOHN A. HOOPER, Vice-President. 

C. B. HOBSON, Assistant Cashier. 

Directors— James D. Phelan, L. P. Drexler, John A. Hooper, O. G. 
Hooker, James Moffltt, S. G. Murphy, Frank J. Sullivan, Robert McElroy, 
and Joseph D. Granc. 

Interest paid on Deposits. Loans on approved securities. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order, Wells, Fargo & Co., or Exchange 
on City Banks. When opening accounts send signature. 

SWiSS A!TieriGan Bank OfLOCARNO, Switzerland, and 

Germania Trust Go. of San FranGisGO f^gr*" 

Paid-up Capital and Reserves, 1620,000. 
(G. T. Oo. $320,000) (S. A. B. $300,000} 
A general savings and commercial banking business transacted. Inter- 
est paid on savings deposits. Loans on approved real estate security, and 
on commercial paper. 

DIRECTORS— Ernst A. Denicke, A. Sbarboro. J. C. Rued, E. Martinoni. 
F. C. Siebe. A. Tognazzini, H Brunner, MoD. R. Venable, A. G. Wleland, 
F. Kronenberg, Charles Martin, C Jehret.P. Tognazzini, S. Grandl. 

Crocker- Woolworth National Bank of S. F. 

Corner Market, Montgomery, 

and Post Streets. 

Pald-Up Capital 11,000,000 

WM. H.CROCKER President 

W. E. BROWN Vice-President 

QEO.W. KLINE Cashier 

DlBBCTOBS— Henry T. Seott, E. B.Pond, Hy. J.Crocker, Geo. W. Soott 



July 30, 1898. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS I.KTTIiR. 



15 



A TRAGIO COINCIDENCE. 



HAVE, YOU ft SON. BROTHER. 



HE bad marched away with his regiment that morning. 
Down Broadway, under streaming banners and 
bunting, the soldiers had made their way to the music of 
the band playing "When Johnny Comes Marching Home." 
She was inconsolable. She had kissed him good-bye at 
the car in the Jersey City depot, and had made her way 
blindly back to the brougham that had brought her over 
from their home. "Captain Ned," as she always called 
him, was gone, perhaps forever. 

She had sobbed all the way home, and now she was 
crouched against the cushions of the divan, looking about 
her in helpless lonesomeness. What should she do? 

She was a bride of only a year and the prospect of 
awaiting his return, alone with servants, in the big house 
where they had lived so happily since their marriage, 
seemed unendurable. 

She was so proud of him, and she felt a thrill of happi- 
ness in the thought that she had left a letter unanswered 
that had come to her a few weeks before. It was a very 
innocent note, written by an old admirer of hers, Jack 
Villiers, who was just out of college. 

The note timply said that he was in town, 
and might he call some afternoon? She knew 
Jack and remembered his tempestuous style 
of love-making — or whatever it might be 
called. So she had not answered the note. 
And now she felt glad that she had avoided 
something of which she knew her husband 
would not approve. 

As she crouched there thinking about it the 
bell rang sharply, and in a moment the maid 
entered with a letter on a tray. It was 
square and pink, with a big seal. 

Mrs. "Ned" took it. It was directed to 
her husband and marked, "To be delivered at 
Jersey City, care train seventy-two. Important." 
The boy had missed the train, but had found 
the city address of the man it was directed to 
and had brought it there. 

Mrs. "Ned" read in the tinted, perfumed 
sheet the story of her husband's faithlessness. 
It was a woman's letter, and was in answer 
to one of his pleadings that the woman take 
the next train for Tampa, where he could see 
her once more before being ordered further 
south. 

The answer said that she was already on the way, and 
congratulated him on being at last free from "that doll- 
faced nonentity that society calls your wife." It spoke of 
the joys past and in prospect so plainly that the face of 
the woman who read it blazed red as flame. 

She looked up. The maid had left the room. In a 
mirror over the mantel Mrs. "Ned" saw a face with flash- 
ing eyes and crimson cheeks, the face of an insulted woman 
anxious for revenge. Her mind was groping about for a 
weapon just as her hand would have groped for a knife if 
those two stood before her. 

The bell rang again. This time softly, as bells do ring 
sometimes, impelled bv a motive that moves from the 
brain to the hand, and makes the electric jingle sound like 
a caress. , 

This time the maid brought in a florist's box and a man s 
card Mrs "Ned" took it in her hand and read it and 
smiled softly. "Mr. John Villiers," it read. "May I see 
you?" was penciled above. 

The call and the flowers w e unpardonably impertinent 
in view of the time and the circumstances. It was not her 
reception day. That was why he had chosen it, she 
thought. , ,-, 

It was just like Jack. Mrs. "Ned" laughed, much to the 
maid's astonishment. 
v "Tell him I shall be there in a moment," she said.— lown 

Topics. 

New line of picture frames, in metal, gold, and old oak, green 
vory, and Japanese gray; also elegant line of picture mouldings. 
John F. Kennedy, Art Dealer, 19 and 21 Post street. 

Kick if you don't get pure Jackson's Napa Soda. 



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Mail him to <Jnv a 

•bO niim'li. w:»lk. or slant! need n . It CUI 
kwolltn, sweating tort, ami makes hot, 1 1 I 
FNM1 cani Blister, get Sore or Callous whore Allen's I i 
N osod. 10,000 testimonials. All druggists and shoe stores soil 
Samples sent FREE \iien B. Olmsted, Le 

N V 



P. fl. WILLIAMS 

MINES. 



Room 1207 Claus Spreckels Building. 
San Francisco, Cal., U, S. A. 

Caulk Address "Clarbt.' 



If tou have any doubt, consult the 

Is Your , California Title Insurance and Trust Go. 

Tjtjg Insurance policies guaranteeing titles to be 

perfect Issued and abstracts made and con- 
PprTfiPit ' tlnued. Money to loan on real estate. 

1 Ul ,uuu ' Offloe-Mllls Building. 

Henry L.. Davis, President. Chas. D. Stuart, Secretary. 

BANKING. 
The Anglo-Galifornian Bank, Limited. 

Capital authorized 16,000,000 

Subscribed 8,000,000 

Paid Up 1,600,000 

Reserve Fund 700,000 

N. E. Con. Fine and Sansome Sts 
Head Office— 18 Austin Friars , London, E. C. 

Agents at New York— J. & W. Sellgman & Co., 21 Broad street. 
The Bank transacts a General Banking Business, sells drafts, makes 
telegraphic transfers, and issues letters of oredlt available throughout the 
world. Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange 
and bullion. IGN. STEINHART 1 ManaM ,„ 
P. N. LILIENTBAL f Managers 

The German Savings and Loan Society. 

No. 526 California Street, San Francisco 

Guarantee capital and surplus (2,109,000 09 

Capital actually paid up In oash.. 1,000 000 00 

Deposits December 31, 1807 26,369,633 36 

OFFICERS: President, B. A. Beoker; First Vice-President, Daniel 
Meyer; Second Vice-President, H. Horstman; Cashier, A. H. It. Schmidt; 
Assistant Cashier, William Herrmann ; Secretary, George Toufny ; Assist- 
ant Secretary, A. H. Muller; Attorney, W. S. Goodfellow. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS : B. A. Becker, Daniel Meyer. H. Horst- 
mann, Ign. Steinhart, N. Van Bergen, E. Rohte, H. B. Russ, D. N. 
Walter and N. Ohlandt . ■ 

Wells Fargo & Go. Bank. 

N. E. Corner Sansome & Sutter Streets 

John J. Valentine .President 

Homer S. King Manager 

H. Wadsworth Cashier 

F. L. Lipman Assistant Cashier 

Cash Capital and Surplus - 16.250.000 

BRANCHES. 

N.Y.City, H. B. Parsons, Cashier: | Salt Lake City, J. B. Dooly, Cashier 

Portland, Or., R. M. Dooly, Cashier. 

Directors— John J. Valentine, Benj. P. Cheney, Oliver Eldrldge, Henry 

E. Huntington, Homer S. King, George E. Gray, John J. McCook, John 

Bermihgham, Dudley Evans. 

London, Paris and American Bank,. Limited. 

N.w. Cor. Sansome & Sutter Sts, 

Subscribed Capital 13,600,000 

Paid Up Capital 12,000,000 

ReserveFund I 850,000 

HeadOjwicb 40 Threadneedle Street, London, E.C. 

AGENTS— New York— Agency of the London, Paris, and American 
Bank Limited, No. 10 Wall Street, N. Y. Paris— Messrs. Lazard, Freres 
& Cie, 17 Boulevard Poissoniere. Draw direct on the prlnoipal oitles of the 
world. Commercial and Travelers' Credits issued. 

SIG. GREENEBAUM )„._.„... 
O. ALTSCHUL J- Managers. 

Security Savings Bank. 

222 Montgomery St.. Mills Building. 

INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. 

LOANS- MADE. 

DIRECTORS. 
William Alvord S.L.Abbot Jr. H.H.Hewlett 

Wm. Babcook O.D.Baldwin E. J. MoCutohen 

Adam Grant W.S.Jones R. H. Pease 

Continental Building & Loan Association o! California. 

Established in 1889. 222 Sansome St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Subscribed Capital, (7,000,000 Profit and Reserve Fund, 1100,000 

Paid-in Capital - - - 1,000,000 " Monthly lnoome, over - - 75,000 

Dr. Ed. E Hill, President. Capt. Oliver Eldridge, Vice-President. 
Wm. Corbin, Secretary and General Manager. 



i6 



SAN FRAN'CISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 30 1898. 



INSURANCE 

THE Coast territory of the Niagara Fire, formerly in 
the hands of Frank N. Rust of the city, has been 
divided into two fields. California will remain with M r. 
Rust, and Oregon and Washington will be looked after by 
W. H. Raymond of Portland, Or. 

Application has been made by the Los Angeles Life and 
Accident Company in the Supreme Court of California to 
change its name to the Decimal Life Insurance Company. 
This company reinsured its risk with the Bankers' Life of 
Los Angeles, which has since failed, and retired from ac- 
tive operations several years ago. The home office of the 
rechristened company will be located in San Francisco. 

Messrs. Baggs & Stovel have been appointed metropoli- 
tan agents of the Lloyd's Union and Crown Fire and Life 
Insurance of London, and have opened an office at 406 
California street. Catton, Bell & Co. are United States 
agents. 

The national convention of mutual life underwriters will 
meet at Mackinac Island, Michigan, July 12th. 

The Denver agreement has been signed by a majority 
of those interested. 

The classified experience of the Travelers' Insurance 
Company during 1897 shows that payments made to per- 
sons insured under the head of "at home and in office" 
amounted to nearly seventeen percent, of the total claims, 
while persons engaged on railways and elevators — employ- 
ers' liability excluded — claimed but a trifle more than 4 per 
cent., and those engaged on railways and steamships only 
5.5 per cent. The popular impression that the safest place 
for a man's feet is terra, firma is also in danger of becoming 
a mere superstition. The Travelers paid 19 per cent, of 
its total claims to pedestrians, and only a little more than 
6 per cent, to those who used carriages and horses. 

When excavating for the foundations of the New York 
Life's printing office on Elm street, New York, the work- 
men came upon a peat log about twenty feet below the 
surface, and it was found necessary to go as much farther 
to get a solid foundation. The locality was formerly the 
bank or margin of a fresh water pond, and was filled in 
between ninety and one hundred years ago. Fragments 
of tree trunks and of bushes were dug up, and among the 
debris were found two copper coins — one a British penny 
of 1797 and the other an American cent of 1800. 

Should the new charter find approval in the legislature, 
fire insurance rates will be materially reduced in San Fran- 
cisco in consequence of the paid fire department provision. 

The Hartford Fire has given those of its clerks who en- 
listed in the naval battalion a year's leave of absence with 
full pay. 

The Frankfort-American Insurance Company has been 
authorized to begin business by the New York Depart- 
ment with a capital of $300,000 and a surplus of $200,000. 
It will transact accident, steam boiler, employers' liability, 
plate glass, and fidelity business, and be managed by Voss, 
Conrad & Co., general managers, with headquarters in 
New York. 

The price of plate glass has gone up since opposition in 
its manufacture has been withdrawn, and the plate glass 
insurance companies are getting together for adequate 
rates. 

Superintendent McNall of Kansas is in favor of having 
the State do all the insurance, in order that the money 
may be kept at home. 

The foreign insurance companies will hereafter pay a 
tax to this State, just as the common domestic companies 
have been accustomed to do. 



A Panorama 440 Miles Long 



From the Observation Car on the New York Central a living pan ■ 
orama 440 miles lon» may be seen. This includes the Genesse, 
Black River and Mohawk Valleys and 143 miles of the Hudson 
River, including the foothills of the Adirondack Mountains; the 
Capitoi at Albany; the Catskill Mountains; the Palisades of the 
Hudson and the New York Central's magnificent approach to the 
metropolis— this being the only trunk line whose trainr enter the 
city of New Vork. 

FtNEstatlonery.stceland copperplate engraving. Cooper A Co., 746 
Marketatreet.San Francisco. 

Jackson's Napa Soda Lemonade is a luxury— try it. 




LONDON ASSURANCE. 
OCEAN MARINE. 



Capital Subscribed $4,482,750 

Capital Paid Up 2,241,375 

Assets 19,195,145 

Capital Subscribed ,.., $6,000,000 

Capital Paid Up 600,000 

Assets 2,602,050 






INSURANCE. 



FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE 



Firemans Fund 



INSURANCE COMPANY, OP SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Capital, $1,000,000. Assets, $3,500,000 



PALATINE 



INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited), OF MANCHESTER, ENGLAND 

SOLID SECURITY. OVER SS, OOO, OOO. OO RESOURCES 

OHAS. A. LATON, Manager 489 California St., S F 

FlBl mSDRAHOl. 

CONNECTICUT FIRE INSURANCE CO. OF HARTFORD. 

Capital Paid Up I i.ooo.uoo 

Assets 8,300,018 

Surplus to Poller Holders 1,868,382 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager. 

COLIN M. BOYD. ?,t B £S$X? tt S,V 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INSURANCE CO., LIMITED, 

OP LIVERPOOL. 

Capita'. W,700,0OI 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE A CO., Agents. 

No. 816 California St., S. F 

Founded A. D. 1792 

Insurance Company of North America 

OF PHILADILPB1A, fllW. 

Paid up Capital 18,000,000 

Surplus to Policy Holders 6,022,016 

JAMES D. BAILEY, General Agent, 41! California St., S. P 

ROYAL EXCHANGE ASSURANCE, OF LONDON. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, A. D. 1726. 

Capital Paid Up, 18,446,100. Assets, 131,584,418 

Surplus to Policy Holders, 18,980. 2S1. 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager. FRANK W. DICKSON, Ass't Manager 

601-603 Montgomery St., corner Sacramento. 

PHOENIX ASSURANCE CO. OF LONDON Established i». 
PROVIDENCE-WASHINGTON INSURANCE CO. moon*™** ■•» 

BUTLER A HALDAN, General Agents, 

418 California St., S. • 



THE THURINGIA INSURANCE COMPANY. 



Capital, I2.2SO,000 Assets. (10.984.248 

Pacific Coast Department: 204-208 SANSOME ST., S. F, 



Of ERFURT, GEKEAN ' 



VOSS. CONRAD& CO., General laanagbcs. 



July 30 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



niiim 



TTt I II I 




HOME DECORATION- 



1 11 1 1 1 1 imi n mil 1 11 11 hi imm 

THKi:i'. U something abiut a big open fireplac. 
very attractive to (he house buililer. but those who have 
had experience, advise a more reasonable size. 

The trouble with a big open grate is that to make it 
barn at all. one must have an enormous amount of fuel. 
And the draft caused by such a big fire makes all the rest 
of the house cold. 

Then, too, there is usually 
ble in getting the tire to burn 
well, as the modern builder will 
not make the great chimney flues, 
such as were built in New En<: 
land a century ago. And if the 
flues aren't in proportion to the 
fireplace, the Are will not draw 
well, 
t gi '• A safe rule is to make the fire- 

place 30 inches wide, 30 high, and 
12 deep, this takes in easily a 
two foot stick of wood, and also 
tits almost all coal grates. 

For the city, two feet is am- 
ple width. For a country house, 
three feet is generous. 

The flue should be 8x8 inches, 
unless the fireplace is over 30 
inches wide. In that case, make 
the flue 8x12. 

Be sure the chimney runs 
higher than the peak or tower of 
the house or than any neighboring 
otherwise result when the' winds 




to }!' piU) /. (-. 



object. A bad draft wil 
are not favorable. 



There was often a good deal of art in the old-fashioned 
door knocker, and it is not unusual to find them now on 
the doors of many fine houses. The faun's head or tiger's 
head with knocker swinging between his teeth, is a 
picturesque form, and so are the shining brass rings sus- 
pended from ornamental plates of metal. But as a bell is 
beard farther than a rap why should not bell pulls be made 
artistic, for the majority will use the convenient bell in 
preference to the artistic knocker. 

* # # 

Paris has awakened to the necessity for controlling the 
character of the ornamentation in the public parks, and 
the result is a commission composed of architects, sculp- 
tors and artists, who have the authority to pass upon the 
character or desirability of any art subjects submitted for 
the adornment of the public places. 

San Francisco should also have a similar commission, 
and through this system avoid or prohibit the erection of 
improper or uncouth art subjects which are rightfully con- 
sidered educational. 

# * * 

A yard square lounge pillow covered with the plain 
denim is pretty, with a strip of blue and white Japanese 
calico laid plain through the center on both sides, the 
edges laced with large white cord tied with long loops, the 
ends being fringed out, making soft fluffy tassels. This 
large white cord is very effective, and may be used in a 
great variety of ways. For outlining a braiding pattern 
it is admirable, and is very easily accomplished. A bold 
design should be selected, and it should be used only on 
large articles. An ingenious woman will find any number 
of ways of combining the denim and the cord, for the car- 
rying out of one idea always brings a dozen in its train. 

Irs st Upon Having Your Ticket to New York, Boston, or 

Other Eastern Cities 
Read over the Nickel Plate (N. Y. C. & St. L. R. R.), the popular 
low-va'e short line. Quick time, unexcelled accommodations, and 
no extra fares charged. Jay W. Adams, Pacific Coast Passenger 
Agent, 37 Crocker Building, San Francisco. Cal. 




Jackson's Napa Soda water cures dyspepsia. 



Without a Rival 

FOE BILIOUS AND NERVOUS DISORDERS 
suph ns 

Weak Stomach 
Impaired Digestion 

Disordered Liver 
Sick Headache, etc. 

IN MEN, WOMEN OR CHILDREN. 

Beecham's Pills taken as directed, will 
also quieklv rHStore Females to complete 
health, as they promptly remove ohstruc- 
tions orirregularities of the system. 

Beecham's Pills 

Annual Sales over 6,000,000 Boxes* 

25c. at all Drutr Stores. 



CITY INDEX AND PURCHASER'S GUIDE 



RESTAURANTS. 
Maison Tortoni, French Rotlsserie. ill O'Farrell street. Private dining 

rooms and banquet hall S Constantinl, Proprietor 
Poodle Dog Restaurant, S E cor Grant ave. and Bush st. Private 

dining and banquet rooms Tel 42B A B Blanco & B Brun. 
Bay State Oyster House and Grill Room, 15 Stockton street and 109 
O'Parrell street. N. M. Adler Proprietor. Telephone Main 5057. 



Dr. Hall, 



MEDICAL 

) McAllister St. . near Jones Diseases of women and children. 



POSTAGE STAMP DEALERS. 
Hawaiian Stamps a specialty. MAKINS & CO 506 Market street. 
Selections on approval: any place in world. W. F. GREANY, 827 Brannan 
The W. H. Holds Stamp Co., (Incorporated), 105 O'Farrell St.. S. F. 

BOILERMAKERS. 
P. F. Dundon's San Francisco Iron Works, 314, 316, and 318 Malnstreet. 
Iron Work of every description designed and constructed. 

h. ISAAG cJONhS, M. D. 

Eye, Ear, Nose, and Throat. 

Office, 222 Post street, between Grant avenue and Stockton Sts., S. F. 
Hours, 10 A. m. to 4 p. m. Sunday by appointment. 

Tel. Grant 101. 

DR. d. NICHOLS, 

(Formerly County Physician of Amador County.) 
Office: 41 Powell street, cornei Powell and Ellis. Residence, 
St Nicholas Hotel. Market, St. Hours: 1 to 4 p. m ; 7 to8p, m. 
Established since 1872 in San Fraocisco 

D U O W t Lv L« L(J. Bookbinder, Paper-Ruler, Printer, 

and Blank-Book Manufacturer. 
Niatitic block, corner Clay and Sausome streets. 

Moet& 
Cljandon, 

White Seal (Grand Cuvee) is unsur- 
passed in quality, dryness and flavor. 

— JV. I'. Times. 



i8 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 30. 1898. 




OSCE upon a time therp dwelt in a city by the spa two 
cousins. One said: "I am bound to make a rich mar- 
riage.'' The other replied: " I also wou'd like so to do." 
But the supply of rich men eligible for matrim ny being 
limited, they concluded that having a "good time'' was 
more agreeable if not so profitable, than hunting riches 
with men attached, and they forthwith procended to follow 
that line. Moral — "Enjoy the fleeting hur." * * * There 
once lived in a large city a man who loved money. "How," 
said he, "can I make more than I have? I will lend on 
mortgage, and then foreclose, and the uxorious interest 
will do it." Moral — "Make money honestly if you can, but 
make money." * * * There once lived a widow with means 
and great social ambition, but no social position to speak 
of. She became desirous of entering the swim. Tea giving 
was not powerful enough to accomplish that end. so she 
called ber daughter to her side and said. "Marry a man 
who has coin and amiability combined, who will let you 
give dinners, fancy balls, and minuet dances." The girl 
complied, having found the specimen required, and now 
the family move in the most fashionable corner of the 
swim. Moral — "In marrying, select a good-natured hus- 
band." * * * Once there lived in a country town a youth 
devoted to commercial pursuits, buttirinu of the humdrum 
life hied him to the bustling city. "I will be a lawyer," 
quoth he. "All great men of our country began life as 
followers of Blackstone." But to he a politician soon be- 
gan to trouble his soul, and he yearned to follow the Boss, 
so joining the two callings he became an illustration of the 
inflated Frog, and now is in danger of bursting. Moral — 
"Don't swell too fast." 

# # # 

Miss Edith Van Buren is in Dawson, and has for ber 
chaperon a Mrs. Hitchcock, a woman wbohas had for hus- 
band a member of our aristocracy, viz., in the navy. It is 
Mrs. Hitchcock who has influenced Miss Edith Van Buren 
to essay fortune in these wilds. Dawson, it is asserted, 
has some society, and a man is earnestly advised to take 
up a black cut-away coat. He would be shot for wearing 
evening dress. So when we come to consider that Miss 
Van Buren, the grand-niece of the late Martin Van Buren, 
and of the further distinction that her family is the only 
one in New York that keeps a cour on Fifth avenue, is up 
in Dawson bent on making money, we are inclined to gasp. 
Now, Miss Van Buren is tall, of an exceedingly handsome 
figure and a noble face. She has snow-white hair surmount- 
ing an aristocratic countenance. She looks distinguished, is 
distinguished, and could well-boast of a descent from one 
hundred Earls were it not for ber bands. Her hand be- 
longs to the people, which is a marked pity. She has cut 
a wide swath in ber way. King Leopold of Belgium, whom 
she speaks of "as a farmer," was at her feet, a Russian 
prince tried to drink himself to death on corn brandy on 
being refused by her, but the strength of his constitution 
and the trials of heredity were too strong for him, and he 
is still drinking and sighing for Edith. English naval and 
military chaps have dropped like leaves in autumn before 
her, while of dukes, counts, and barons who have offered 
their titles to ber she has lost tally. And now, Edith Van 
Buren, almost a millionaire, the despair of many hearts, 
beautiful, strong, and yet young, is running an animato- 
scope in Dawson. 

* 9- * 

A very much discussed member of the Pacific-Union 
Club, whose constitution stands in no need of a nerve tonic, 
is playing a domestic game which shows no sitrns of the ex- 
pected dissolution. How he works it is arousing the keen- 
est curiosity of the other clubmen, but the result seems 
invariably successful. 

During the earlier hours of the evening, he is in his own 
home with his charming young wife and pretty babies, the 
ideal husband and father. Precisely at ten o'clock every 
night, he softly closes a side door, on. the outside, and 
walks around the corner where a coupe stands wait 

A few minutes later he is purchasing a stack of blues 



from the banker, and bis speculation is unceasing until 
3 a. m. He is driven home in the same conveyance, enters 
apparently undetected, and is about at his nominal busi- 
ness the same morning, not so late as to cause any serious 
inconvenience. 

What everyone wants to know is: How much of this 
performance is a domestic secret, and how long Monsieur 
can continue these habits without necessitating retirement 
to recoup health and purse. 

* * * 

The popular chaplain of the Tennessee regiment, the 
Reverend Louis Lt-land, is the happiest man at Camp 
Menitt. He met his fate soon after his arrival here, hav- 
ing been hard hit by an arrow from an invisible bow. To 
au officer of his regiment who congratulated him upon his 
approaching marriage, which will be solemnized next 
week, be talked with rapturous enthusiasm regarding the 
delights of San Francisco. 

" Do you know," he said. "I have half a mind to make 
this lovely city my birthplace?" 

* # * 

Gossip says with a good deal of insistence that the rup- 
tured engagement of the daughter of the eminent jurist 
and the son of a wealthy mother, bids fair to be "on" 
again, and that the coming visit to the coast of the young 
lady is the precurser of it. 

Wedding and Birthday Present*. Magnificent as*i>rtment to 
select from at the art store of S. «& G. Gump. 113 Geary street. 



The famous old JKSSF, MOORE WHISKY is recommended by physi- 
cians for family and medicinal use because it is pure. 



THE MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 

or the United States Army 

Awarded their last contract (or sherry 
to Agents of MESSRS. 

Dull Gordon & 60. 



IN PREFERENCE TO ALL OTHER 
COMPETITORS. 

SOLD BY THE, LEADING WINE 
MERCHANTS AND GROCERS. 



Awarded Medal and Diploma Columbian Exposition, Chicago, 1893. 




CHARLES MEINECKE & CO., 

314 Sacramento St., S. P. 



Agents. 



San FrancisGo Dress-Gutting School, 

French tailor method taught. Full course of instruction In the 
art of Dressmaking. Patterns cut to order. Terms reasonable. 

NO. 916 MARKET ST., Opposite the Emporium, San Francisco. 



LUDLflM.^ 

92S Sutter St. 



ELOCUTION and 

DRAMATIC ART 



Lft GRftNDE LAUNDRY, Telephone bus* us. 

Principal office. 23 Powell St., opp. Baldwin Hotel. 

Branch— 11 Taylor St.. near Golden Gate avenue. 

Laundry— Twelfth St.. between Folsomand Howard Sta., San Franc) boo. 

WC3K /full 3(1(1 W0IH6I1 TERS ( the great Mexican rem- 
edy; It gives health and strength to ihe Sexual Organs. Depot at 323 Mar- 
ket street. San Francisco. Send for circular. 



JoWimid. 



As a table water is unsurpassed. 
— London Hospital Gazette. 



July 30 i.iyS 



SAN IRANC1SCO NliWS I.KTTKR. 



>9 



Jfnc I 




) conupi/tB gossip 



Jul,, 



TK 1 U'HIES from the Spanish main are thicker nor Hies 
in June, but it does seem strange that thev should he 
monopolized by the yellow journals. They place them on 
exhibition for the education of their followers. They are 
the first flags captured at Manila and at Santiago, shells 
from every port where they have been fired. Mauser rifles 
and machettes, sections of torpedoes that didn't gooff, etc. 
Th. so yellow journals each have the nucleus of a firs' 

dime museum. 

* # * 

It is whispered among the Californians who talk politics 
in New York that lei turpritei d> divorce will be nothing 
compared to let surprises ■ /, campagne this year. A dark 
horse, yea, a very dark horse — byname, Frank McLaugh- 
lin — is already entered ostensibly for the Gubernatorial, 
but really for the Senatorial race, as the junior Senator 
would like him for a confrire. Geographical'y, Frank can 
meet the exigencies of the situation, being a resident 
either of O oville, San Francisco, or Santa Cruz. Stranger 
things have happened, and 'neath McLaughlin's wide som- 
brero and guileless smile there is a well-garnered store- 
house of political cunning and savair /aire. To illustrate 
how important the Pacific Coast newsgatherers considered 
the hybrid nomination of Maguire for Governor, it had to 
be learned from the San Francisco papers, not being tele- 
graphed to any of the leading Eastern journals. 

* * * 

Jack Follansbee has been off to Santiago on a lark with 
his friend, Will Hearst. He was attached to Hearst's 
staff, and so was enabled to get to the front and be in the 
thick of the battle, acting as skirmisher, scout, retriever, 
and nurse. He was in close quarters several times, but 
nulled through in safetv. Jack's friends have wondered 
why be didn't join the R mgh Riders, for their companion- 
ship, bravery, and elan would have suited him exactly. 
Follansbee is glad he went to the front. It was a new and 
novel experience to talk about over the post-prandial 



The old saying, "cold-blooded as a fish," should be quali- 
fied so as to read, "as some of the Fishes." While Hamil- 
ton Fish Sr. was down at the Santiago front digging up 
the remains of his son, who was among the first to fall 
fighting for his country, Mr. and Mrs. Stuyvesant Fish, 
(brother and sister-in-law respectively) at Newport were 
giviog big dinners and entertainments to while away the 
time. These continued even while the body of young Fish 
was being buried. Are the Four Hundred naturally cal- 
lous ? or does the life they lead harden them to the ordi- 
nary decencies? 

* * * 

It is reported that Irving M. Scott, of the Union Iron 
Works, is coming home with a big battle-ship order in his 
inside pocket from the Czar of all the Russias. John Bull 
will have to look to his ship-building laurels now that the 
Yankees have practically demonstrated at Manila and 
Santiago what they can do, especially with California-built 
men of war. It means a great deal, too, for San Fran- 
cisco's business prosperity. 

* * * 

The palm for the most-persistent and brazen-faced yel- 
low journalism— i. e., bald-headed lying— now lies between 
Mr. Bennett of the Herald and Mr. Hearst of the Journal. 
"The Herald's 'Golden Rod' news yacht was the only one 
to enter Santiago yesterday," says the Bennett organ. 
"The Journal's yacht 'Anita' alone entered Santiago yes- 
terday, and I have the pilot's certificate I" exclaims Mr. 
Hearst exultingly. Meanwhile Mr. Pulitzer looks on from 

the World dome, and parrot-like cries: "Who the ■ 

cares ! " 



Charmion, the American "artiste" who originated the 

classic idea of disrobing in mid air on a trftpexe, bin •»■ 

hns been chartered for a series of Condon rxliibi 

the alleged si \mcrican geni..s having 

stimulated the demand from the other side. 

• • • 

A whole wi -ek and nothing has happened to chic petite 
Edna Wallace— miralrilt dictu I Kniiik Nm s. 



Til ERE is a nephew of the late Washington Bishop in 
town who has been giving wonderful readings of char 
acters. He can he found any evening in a down town 
resort and with very little prompting dons the mantle of 
the prophet and gives vent to remarkable utterances 
His eyes fell upon Attorney Thomas Kcardon, his tierce 
mustache and his well-pressed pants. "Here Tom, let the 
professor tell your fortune," was the cry as Thomas 
passed in. The Wizard stared at the solemn faced lawyer 
and began to exorcise the spirit of invention. Finally he 
said "You are a man of many gifts, and your energy is 
sufficient to give three men nervous prostration. I see 
before you a great future. You are going to govern a 
nation. Your sway will extend over millions." Then did 
Li Hung Cnang Reardon's countenance beam forth happi- 
ness, for have not the Chinese intimated to him that he is 
able to fill the Viceregal chair? Then in stalked Bill 
English. Now Bill English does not believe in prophesy, 
so when the Wizard informed him that he was an aspirant 
for a great office and that he would spend a great deal of 
money trying to secure it — "not your own money, other 
people's money," said the Wizard. Bill English felt that 
a law ought to be introduced making it penal for people 
to 'ell the truth. 



>OOOOOOCKMXWOOOS 



lANDY CATHARTIC 



CURE CONSTIPATION 



10c. 
1 25c. 50c. 

Constipation Afflicts 

part of the people all the timet 
all the people part of the time. 
1 Are you a chronic or occasional sufferer from constipation ? < 
Do you want a sure, pure cure ? , 

CASCARETS (eat 'em like candy) will stimulate [ 
your liver, regulate your bowels, leave your i 
blood clean and rich, sweeten your breath and ] 
make your stomach do its work. 

CASCARETS KILL DISEASE GERMS, cure, 
sick headache, taste good and do good, please ' 
tie children, destroy and drive off worms and I 
other parasites. 

A ioc box will prove their merit, and put you on i 
', the right road to perfect and permanent health. Try ! 
' a ioc box to-day 1 If not pleased, get your money j 
back. Larger boxes, 25c or 50c. 



BOOKLET AND 
SAMPLE 

FREE 
FOR THE 
ASKINQ. 

5o<>c^><><>o<><><><x>ochk><><><><x><>c-o-cso-o<><>- 




Th© 
only Cenulne. 
Beware of 
imitations I 



ADDRESS 

Ster ng Remedy Co. 

CH CAQO OR 
NE H YORK. 2S5 1 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Oceanic Steamship Company. 
Dividend No. 83, Fifty cents per share, of the Oceanic Steamship Com- 
pany, will be payable at the office of the company, 327 Market street, on 
and after Monday, August i, 1-98. Transfer boons will close on Tuesday, 
July 26, 1898, at 3 o'clock p, m. E. H. SHELDON, Secretary. 

Office— 327 Market street, San Francisco, Cal. 






SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 30, 1898. 




good many of the rural re- 
sorters back to the city 
1 again, and frcm now on it is 
expected that there will not 
be such a dearth of events 
in the social world as has been the case during June and 
July. The military continue to be the motif for what little 
entertaining is done ia town, and one of the prettiest din- 
ners given during the summer had Mrs. Martin for its 
hostess last Friday. It was partly in honor of her son 
Peter's return to the maternal roof tree from the East 
and partly in honor of three young Lieutenants — Cameron, 
Thorn, and Smith, of the 7th California Volunteers; the 
young ladies who completed the party were the Misses 
Fanny and Josephine Loughborough, Miss May Hoffman, 
and Miss Lillian Young. 

Phil. Lydig, whose chief claim to distinction hereabouts 
seems to be that he was Clarence Mackay's best man on 
the occasion of bis recent marriage, is too well-known as a 
social light in his native place to escape lionizing by his 
fellow New Yorkers in San Francisco, and, as a conse- 
quence, was surfeited with attentions from the time of his 
arrival en route to Honolulu until he sailed for that place 
on the St. Paul. 

A very handsome dinner was given last week by Mr. 
and Mrs. Joseph Weil in celebration of the engagement of 
their daughter Annie to Charles B. Weil, of Merced. 
Another of last week's dinners had John Rush Baird as 
host, and Morris Davis, of the Philadelphia, as chief guest, 
to meet whom were asked fifteen other Stags all belong- 
ing to the Signa fraternity to which Mr. Davis belongs. 

The English idea of a two or three days' House Party 
has been the correct thing "down the road " this season. 
The favorite time is from Saturday till Monday for the 
men, the ladies prolonging their stay during the week, 
and sometimes taking in two Sundays while on their visits. 
Especially pleasant are those at Menlo Park, the number 
of summer residents ia that vicinity is very large, and 
then B'lingham is within such an easy distance the men 
who most affect that place are always available for any- 
thing like a dance, or picnic, or other country diversion. 

The engagement is announced of Miss Carrie Weidero, 
who is well-known in San Francisco Society, and Mr. E. 
Lee Dunn, a prominent Native Son and manager of the 
supply department of T. F. Miller & Co., of Jerome, Ari- 
zona. 

The wedding of Miss Alice G. Friedlander to Mr. Eman- 
uel H. Lauer, of Portland, Oregon, will take place at the 
residence of Mr. S. H. Friedlander, No. 2603 Steiner 
street, on Monday evening, August 8th, at 9 o'clock. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. B. Alexander, who arrived from the 
East last week, are now at Del Monte, where they will re- 
main for a goodly portion of their visit to California. Life 
there is increasing in liveliness and jollity, and the various 
devices for enjoyment are entered into with zest by all the 
guests. The baseball game at Pacific Grove last Satur- 
day between the Burlingame nine and the Pacific Grove 
nine attracted a large attendance from Del Monte as well 
as the country round, and resulted in the defeat of the 
Pacific Groves. The opening of the new grill room at the 
De' Monte Club House was appropriately celebrated last 
week, Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Worden giving a welsh rarebit 
party, which was a very jolly affair, and much gratifica- 
tion is felt at this new addition to the pleasure and com- 
fort of the place. The afternoon teas given by Louis 
Bruguiere are voted just "too too." Among recent addi- 
tions to the guests are Mr. and Mrs. J. O. B. Gunn, Mrs. 
C. A. Spreckels, Mrs. E. E. Eyre, Mrs. Geo. Pinckard, 
Mr. and Mrs. A. L. Foster of Hartford, Conn., Mr. and 
Mrs. Wm. Haas, Mrs. Greenebaum, etc. 




Guests at Summit Soda Springs have included Mr. and 
Mrs. Hall McAllister, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Bruce, and the 
Misses Janet and Bertie Bruce. Harry Stetson has been 
one of the beaux at Castle Crags; Mrs. Henry Gibbons 
and family have been rusticating at Cazadero; Mrs. J. D. 
Thornton, accompanied by her son Will from Anaconda, is 
at Paso de Robles; Mr. and Mrs. Frank Carolan are occu- 
pying their villa at Burlingame; the Homer Kings are 
gone to Catalina Island; Mrs. Wm. McKittrick has been 
among the visitors at Lake Tahoe; Gus Taylor has gone 
on a recuperating trip to the Sandwich Islands; George 
Crocker has departed Eastward, en route for Europe, to 
join Mrs. Crocker; Mrs. Hitchcock and Mrs. Lily Coit 
were at the Waldorf in New York last week, en route 
homewards after a prolonged visit to Paris. 

It would seem as though Santa Cruz were deter- 
mined not to let San Rafaelites have it all their own 
way in the paper chase line as the denizens of that 
hamlet by the sea have inaugurated a like series, 
the first of which took place last Saturday. The 
Sea Beach Hotel was the scene of the start as well 
as finish; the route was via Twiu Lakes to Capitola 
and back. J. H. Toler and H. W. Morgan were the 
hares, and the eighteen hounds included a number 
of ladies as well as men, Miss Mabel Chase being 
second in at what would have been the death had 
the hares been caught, which they were not. 

The Hotel Rafael has had several pleasant addi- 
tions to the list of its visitors the past week. Miss 
McBean, while the guest of Miss Goad, was the re- 
cipient of a number of polite attentions at the hands 
of the summer dwellers in the vale. Saturday's 
paper chase was one of the best of the season; Miss 
Morgan was the first lady in at the death, and Mrs. 
Baxter came in second. The William Babcocks are 
at home again from their tour abroad, and are now 
in residence at their pretty San Rafael cottage 

The wife of Captain Russell, who sailed last week for 
Manila on the Rio, is a daughter of Col. A. S. Kimball, re- 
cently Chief Quartermaster in this Department. Mrs. 
Russell is a bride, and came here with her husband to see 
him sail; her brother, who is in the Volunteers, also de- 
parted for Manila at the same time. Another Army lady 
who has been doubly bereaved of both husband and son by 
the war in the Philippines is Mrs. Blandina Babcock, who 
is now enjoying life at that charming resort, Lake Tahoe, 
which is said to be exceptionally gay this season. 

Dr. W. J. Younger's friends here are anticipating his 
coming with great pleasure. He is looked for about the 
8tb of August, and will make a stay of some duration. 
Mr. Chas. Holbrook, accompanied by Miss Olive Holbrook, 
a coming bud of the Swim, was among the arrivals from 
New York last week; Fred Webster is also back again 
from his Eastern flyer. Among other returners to town 
are Mrs. A. N. Drown and Miss Bernie, who divided their 
vacation between Catalina Island and Coronado. 

The announced engagement of Miss Louise Dutton 
and Captain L. J. Leland, Chaplain of the First Ten- 
nessee Regiment, has a spice of romance in it, as it 
appears to have been a case of love at first sight, the 
couple having met for the first time at Camp Merritt 
only a few weeks ago. While the wedding day has 
not yet been named, the ceremony will be an event of 
the very near future. The wedding of Miss Rose 
Davey and Edward Dale Mendell will take place at St. 
Paul's Church, Oakland, next Wednesday evening. 

The Bohemians had a gala time at their midsummer 
jinks in Meeker's Grove last Saturday, at which over 
three hundred members were present. The success 
was largely due to the excellent arrangements of 
committee, which consisted of M. A. Newhall, Thomas 
Pennell, Solly Walter, and H. J. Stewart. Joe Redding, 
Horace Piatt, General Barnes, and George Bromley took 
leading place in the festivities. 

On the 2:ith inst. Miss Hattie L. Dunlap and Miss Maud 
H. Morgan left for an extended visit to the principal 
cities of Canada and the United States, including Wash- 
ington, as the guests Judge Hill of the Department of 
State 




July 30. 189S. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LBTTBR. 



The New York regiment has beeu especially fortunate 
in havinir friends in California; and old residents of Albany, 
now living in Oakland, gave a number of them a charming 
reception, dance, and >upper last Friday eveninjj. Among 
their entertainers this side of the bay is Miss tngardeld, 
of Bush street, who t'ave flfty of the officers a delightful 
little party on Monday evening. Another regiment «i ich 
has ccme in for alarge share of San Franciscan hospitality 
is the First Tennessee, and one of the pleasantest imriies 
of recent date was given in honor of its gallant officers by 
Mrs A. S. Townsend. at her residence on California sir. tt. 
on Tuesday evening. Colonel Smith and his staff and Brig- 
adier-General King being the especial guests of tie occa- 
sion. The house was lavishly decorated with flags, foliage, 
and flowers, and an elaborate supper was served. 

On Tuesday evening the parlors of the M. E. Church, on 
California street, were again the scene of a reception for 
the boys in blue, those of the Sixth and Seventh regiments 
of California Volunteers being the guests this time; the 
programme of entertainments was a varied one, and a 
substantial supper was a welcome finale to the evening's 
pleasure. Next Thursday evening the Kansas Regiment 
will give a drill at the Pavilion for the benefit of the Army 
and Navy Christian Commission. The largest military 
gathering of late, of a social nature, was the reception 
last Saturday at the Presidio by ex-army officers of the 
Loyal Legion to the officers of the Tennessee Regiment, 
from Camp Merritt. The ball-room, where it was held, 
was draped with the national colors, and the band of the 
Fourth Cavalry provided music for the occasion, which 
was a remarkably pleasant one for hosts and guests alike. 

On Monday Captain L. E. Lyon of Company H, 8th Cali- 
fornia Volunteers, at Camp Barrett, Oakland, was pre- 
sented with a very handsome service sword by his old com- 
rades of the Stockton Guards. The presentation speech 
was made by Colonel Nunan, and was received with great 
enthusiasm. Miss Birdie Clayes, of the Berkeley Sanitary 
High School Corps, accompanied by Miss Olga Meyer, Miss 
Alice Meyer, and Miss Alice Jones, also presented the men 
of that company with comfort bags, and are now prepar- 
ing a mess tent for them. This society is very active, and 
its efforts in behalf of Company H are immensely appre- 
ciated. 

Ex- Queen Liliuokalani, of the Sandwich Islands, was a 
guest at the California Hotel for some days prior to sail- 
ing for home by the Gaelic last Tuesday. Accompanying 
her was Col. Richardson, en route home to Hawaii from 
Washington, who also made the California Hotel his head- 
quarters during his stay in San Francisco. Other recent 
guests at the California Hotel include John F. Carrere of 
Los Angeles, Winfield R. Moore of Santa Barbara, Dr. 
and Mrs. W. Waters of Honolulu, Col. Fairchild of Peta- 
luma, Col. Anderson and Col. James Scott of Montana, 
and Mr. A. L. Doty of New Yoi;k. 

The Hotel Vendome, at San Jose, has been a favorite 
resort with San Franciscans this season. Among recent 
guests, some of whom will remain for a while yet, are Mrs. 
and Miss Geisleman, Winfield Jones, Mrs. Heloise Cham- 
berlain and daughter, Reuben Lloyd, Mrs. DeGreayer, 
Mrs. Sam Knight, Miss Bessie Shreve, Mrs. James Otis, 
Miss Carrie Taylor, the Hall McAllisters, Miss Emily 
CarolaD, Dr. and Mrs. Lengfeld, and others. 

Dr. Allbutt, the noted English specialist now lecturing 
in this city, and Mrs. Allbutt are the guests of Dr. and 
Mrs. Barkan at their Mill Valley villa. 

Wm. L. Tomlins, who was for twenty-three years leader 
of the famous Apollo Club of Chicasro, will arrive in San 
Francisco about the 10th of August, and will give a series 
of lectures on music, its nature, and influence on the 
human mind. His influence with children chorus work has 
been marvelous. During the World's Fair he led all the 
choral exercises. Mr. Tomlins will be remembered in this 
city, as he was here in 1895 and gave several concerts and 
lectures on men. The coming series will be a treat to 
music lovers. 

Mrs. Major Darling and Mrs. Jessie Carr Seal, who have 
been at Highland Springs for some time, will early next 
week go to iEtna Springs for the remainder of the season. 



Capt Hener has been appointed Commissary Quarter 
master, and has been detailed to accompany the Srandia 
in that capacity to Manila and return with the transports 
10 this cny after the discharge of the soldiers at that 
port. 

Infant Haallh. 
[oqalrles prompted the publication <■( "Infant Health" in pam* 
I'hU't form, by the N. Y. Condensed Milk < ' »., N. v., and the Hppre- 
elation o: it< value led to an elaborate edition, sent on application. 

Th- :»pparel .lon't niak^ Hit- mau ; but ih<' uniform helps amazingly 
to make the eoldier. Handsome, neai-fiiting mils for army ami 
navy officer-, are mad B bv 1. M . Lltobfield .^ Co., tailors, 12 Post 
street. Every garment SL'tit out lits Itke a glove, is exactly and cor- 
rectly made out of the very tine-u and mo-t-durablo material. 

\*t:w DBStQNS in Waist Sets. Links and Buttons. Sterling silver and 
-liver glided from i5 ceDts up. J. N. Bkittain, Jeweler, SB Geary street 

For a cool head — drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 

College San Rafael 

For Young Ladies. 

Winter term commences August 4th, 1898 

Conducted by the Sisters of St. Domlnlo. 
Full collegia course of studies. A boarding school of highest 
grade. Superb modern building. Steam heated. Beautiful 
and commodious olass rooms. Music and art rooms. 

Located in the lovely Magnolia Valley. 
Unsurpassed for beauty and healthfulness. Address, 

MOTHER SUPERIOR, 

College Saa Rafael. San Rafael, Cal 



IRVING INSTITUTE 

2126 California St,, S. F. „ 



Select boarding and day school 
for young ladies 



Accredited to the Universities. Seminary and full Conservatory of 
Music. Primary department for children. A oarriage will call. 
For further information address the principal, 

Rev. Edward B. Church. A. n. 

TRINITY SCHOOL. tnT/™Siml dayschooltovhoys 

Christmas Session Opens First Monday in August. 
An accredited school with the University of California and the In- 
land Stanford Jr. University. A corps of eleven teachers. 

Rev. Dr. Spalding. Rector, 

3300 Washington street, S. F. 

HRS. C. n. BEANE'S SELECT SCHOOL 

Will commence its new term AUGUST 1. 1898- 

All English branches taught Also special attention given to the 
course of study followed by the public schools. 

For further particulars apply at 

2073 MISSION STREET, San Francisco. 

MILLS COLLEGE AND SEMINARY 

Grants diplomas and confers degrees. Rare opportunities offered 
inncusic. One hour's ride from San Francisco. Write for cata- 
logue to 

MRS- G. T. MILLS, President, 

Mills College P. O., Alameda County, Cal. 

Thirty-second year. Fall term opens August 3, 1898. 



D 



R. T. FELIX GOURAUD'S ORIENTAL 
CREAM, OR MAGICAL BEAUTIFIER. 



Removes Tan, Pimples, Freckles, Moth 
Patches, Rash, and Skin Diseases, and 
every blemish on beauty, and defies de- 
tection. It has stood the test of 48 years 
and is so harmless we taste it to be sure 
it is properly made. Accept no counter- 
feit of similar name. Dr. L. A Sayre 
said to a lady of the haut-ton (a pa- 
tient) : "As you ladies will use them, I 
recommend ' Gouraud's Cream ' as the 
least harmful of all the Skin prepara- 
tions." For sale by all Druggists and 
Fancy-goods Dealers in the United 
States, Canadas, and £urope 




FERD. T. HOPKINS, Prop'r. 

37 Great Jones St., N. Y. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 30. 1898. 




WBmnf 



:aarks tie tricentenary of Stakes: 

-bant of Vetuc* 



Although 79 years of age. Ecu 

paiater of aaknale. appears :- 
ber work is concerned. She spends 
perched oa a ladder ia ber studio. 



rs a day 



Park A v- 3 tbe city of Rochester is 

crossed by three consecutive streets which bear masculine 
"ashman with a carpet-bag entered one of 
the cars toe other day, and sat down einger'y near the 
door. Four or ar men completed the 

passengers. The car swung around the corner of Cbest- 
sbouted the conductor. A man 
car stopped, and the man alighted A 
.arceared another cross street. 
im'" announced tbe conductor. Another m 
TbelrishoD:. 
shouted the conductor. The third man left tbe car. 
it bad started 00 the Irishman arose and apnroacbed 
nductor. "Oi want to eet out at Avnfn B." he said, 
oorst name isMicbat r.s Companion. 

Ska— 1 don't see what the men fnd so fascinating in that 

ey are al» g over ber costumes. 

Hi— That cr at "tbe oezt'ta- 1 <-ee now. 

Tbe bulk of tbe fascination is not in, but but of her dress. 

—Standard. 

h. — This is tbe last time I will ever ask you to marry 

Shi— D> you swear it, Rudolph? Hi— I swear by 

I sacred. She— Tben I accept. — Detroit 

Free Press. 

- • g - . —I — I wish we were good friends 

enough for you to— to call me by my first name. Sbe 
■ helping him along) — Ob. your last name is good enough 
for me. 

"Do you think you can dodge bullets I tbiok so. 

I've been dodging bicrcles for about five years. "—Detroit 
Free Press. 

Saatp-toa. Hob-son. Wat-son. 

rorJeSsa* is wontj jtoo4 
'.riplctiMCkuitr 

- : : - said New pop. "that if tbe Spaniards bombard 
New York 1 so in tbe day tint So that you 

can d: . wake the baby." 

The F -*•. wnt— How clear at. ■ - tbe west. 

• Hate — Why not? Tbe captain bas been sweeping 
tbe horiaon with his glass. — Indianapolis Journal. 

-j did be a Jest sister when be could 

bad the youngest''' "WeH, be said that be preferred 
seasoned troops for a campaign." — Town Topics. 

*1 o«e my success in life." said tbe starring, but •■■ 
famous author, "to tbe right use of bra:-- S io I," 

chimed in tbe millionaire — "tbe other m? 

B i rti» Tbey say that a man and his wife often 
grow to look like each other. Bevuah- I hope I shan't 
meet you more than half way. 

tou found a large sum of moot 
back to tbe ow . be hoc- - _-ende 

Blaev 

ea you married me you said you were w • 
Hi 

J» m — Half tbe world works too much. Hama- 
aad the other half is worked too cftec — Town Topics. 



-avisos. 5 Si =. Eodi • tie :ve?t ta^.e watt* :•- lac » - : 



A Leather Lesson 

Thick leather isn't »lw»yg dur&Mc. Tbln 
leatuer isn't always coniaortat'i- 
leather im> i always waterproof. l*ear 
leather isn't a.wayftbeat- Low price leather 
Isn't alwavtciititp. Vlcl Kid is always re- 
liable. Tbis Is tbe reason It 1» fast su|*t- 
aedlnc all other leather*. Vlcl Kid Is the 
only leather that repel> the cold, yet af- 
•orba no heat. It Is the only leather free 
from oil. yet Impervious to water. It is 
tneonly leather soft enough forcomfoi 
strong enough for any kind of wear. 

VICI KID 

mikn tbe hum beannfol shoes flsr 

» a***, Ilie MOW ivlLf ru;ir 
•bora tor mm. tbe DM ilur»Ue 
•■- :«! Tcbt-Jrrn ». c .. -• Tbe 
Id q 




ASSESSMENT NOTICE 
Crown Point Gold and Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal pl*ce of business— Sad :■ Location of 

law fllM. b..: N-r.j» 

XoUee t* hereby rtren tbat At a twetsnr ol Ike Board at Director* o! this 
coavpeay. Aeid on tbe 7th day or July. l-S* an atsc assaenl (No "* 
of Five cants was levied upon eacb aod every share of tbe capital 
•lock of said com pan j parable immediately to the Secretary, at lAeoate* 
6 U Ub> building-, third Door Sao Francisco. Cal. 

Dt Shall rea&ala unpaid OA 

WEDNESDAY, tbe 1Mb DAY Or ACGCST, ItH, 
will be flfrlin dellmjoenl sad duly adrerttaed few sale At public aaetica: 



.; .-'. H =-:.:-■ 



and unleaa pajneat aball be made before, kill be sold ea 1 
lut day of August. la*, to par tae delinquent iliMisnl. weather witb 
costs of advertising sad expense* of sale By order of tbe Board of Direc- 
tor*. JAMES NEWLANDS. Secretary 

-Boobs third Boor Mills buiktlnf. M. E eoraar Bask and Mont, 
" s Francisco. Cal 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Lomj P- ata Pesras Kan<h Company. 
Locaticr-of pnn. 1 pal place of boslnoaa— oaa r>*aci*oo. Cal. 
of 1 aocb — Mor 

•r is hereby riven tAat at a avert In* of tae Board of Directors 
SB tae Thirteenth lists > day of Ju.i. lib* an saaeaaasa* Sola 
Dollars (tan par share ■** levied npoa tbe capital stock 
corporation, payable Isasi illllllj in t'nltod SIAIA* fold coin to 1 
retary. at tbe oaaee of the co m piny. S 'o, 



Si lie 
■eSae- 

CaL 



MONDAY, tte Hta DAY OF ACGfsT. taps, 
will be delianaent. aafl adrertiaed lor sale at pahtlc a aci loa. aa 
ei « n.*;- Man » .. >;*:.?* nanaas tie \i-.t. day 



■ > -. 
, 1»». to pay the deilaqoeni l a e i i a ra l. "toreiber a>iu'oosis of 
lofsale. By order ot tbe Board o.' Dlraclorv 

UEOKGE A. STOKY. Secretary 
: S Past street. Sas Fraaclsco. CAL 

ANNUAL MEETING 
Haaalaw Plantation C o m pany 

The rertiiar aaaaal aseetlaf of the stockholders of the Hakalas 
paaaawawai Caaaaaaj a hi hi - »: '■-'. *ce .■' :t. ■aaajaarf 5r~ \:»- 
set street. San fT a a ciaco . Cal oa 

MONDAY TBW tax DAY OF AVCU ST. ISP*. 

at the hoar of 11 o'clock a a^. fDrtheparpoaeof essettar » Boardof Director* 
to serre lor the rasa hay year, sad tor the traasaouos of each other tms ia eas 
as mar eoane beaare the MeeHac. Trana'er hooks will close oa Fr.isy 

.i.y ».. lSk» a: l»t..tlp a 

EH SHELDON. 
rhlarbMsi — -■ s»i >--»•-. »« i"». 



ANNUAL MEETING. 



n;-.. 



The recalar aaaaal awethbr of the stockholders of the Ciadoa Iron aad 
t siaaaiilTm W 



..Wc- 
at Baale aad B s s ai ah - Bm Praaahaoi QaU.aa 

MONDAY. TWk 1st DAY OT A V .VST laW. 

.ck a ■ . . *jr the aarpoae of deetlaj a Board of Tras- 

theawethaf, 

L B MEAD Sec-eurr 
aTateakaaaa 1 --: fhaaawhai 




July 30, 1898. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



23 



Southern Pacific Co. --Pacific System. 

TrftlBS L«»tc and »r« Dot 10 Arrive at BAN FRANCISCO: 
(Main Line. Foot of Market Street ) 



From July to. tms. 



■6.-0U a NUea.S»n Jose, acd way stations *8:«6 a 

7:00 a BeoicU Sulsuo. *nd Sacramento 10:4a a 

7:00 A Marys viile. Orovi He, an.l Redding, vis Woodland 6:lS p 

7:00 A Klm-ra, Vac^rlUe and Rum soy * *S r 

7:3u a Marttnu:. San Kamon, \ aiirjo. Napa. Calls toga, Santa Rosa 0:1b p 

9:00a Atlantic Express. Ogdrn and East 8:46 P 

8:90 a San Jose, Stockton, Vall-y Spring, lone, Sacramento, 

MarysTille Cfatco. Tehama, and Red Bluff 4:I6P 

8:S0 A Petere, Oakdate, and Jamestown ?-ift p 

■8:99a milon.... ri.sr 

Ouua New Orleans Express. Merced. Fresno, Bakenfleld, Santa 
Barbara, Los Angeles, Demlng, El Paso. New Orleans, and 
Ea»«.. . 0:4Sp 

10 00 a Vallejo, Martinet, and way stailocs :.4Sp 

•1:UQ P Sacramento River steamers •OrOup 

San Jose, Nllcs, and Way Stations 19: 15 A 

8:00 P Llvermore. Mendola. Hanford. and Vlsalla 4:ISp 

Llvermore. San Jose, Niles and »VayStatlons 110:15a 

<:00p Martinez. San Ramon, Vallejo. Napa. Callstoga, El Verano 

and Santa Rosa 9:15a 

4:00 p Benlcia. Vacaville. Woodland. Knight's Landing, Marys- 

vllle, Orovllle, and Sacramento 10:46a 

4-80 p Niles. San Jose. Tracy, and Stockton 7:1Sp 

4:9) p Stockton and Lodi 18:16 P 

4 30 p Lath. op. Modesto, Merced. Fresno, *Mojave. Santa Barbara 

and Los Angeies ?:4.s a 

4:30 p Martinez. Merced, (Raymond for Yosemite) and Fresno 19:16 F 

4 3u p Santa Fe Route, Atlantic Express, (or Mojave and East ... omsp 

6:0up European mall, Ogden and East 9:45a 

•<S:Q0p Vallejo 13:15 p 

0:00 P Haywrds. Niles and San .Tose 7:45a 

J7:00 P Vallejo, Port Costa, and way stations . 19:45 p 

8:00 P Oregon Express, Saorameuco, Marysville, Redding, Port- 
land Piippt Sound and East 8:15a 



San Leandro and Haywards Local. (Foot of Market St.) 



8:00 A 
9 :00 a 
10:00 a 
ill. 00 A> 
112 :C0 H \ 
t3'iJU p 
5:00 P 
7:00 P I 



M.ELKUSE, Seminary Park, 
fltchburg. elmhorst, 
San Leandro. 
South San Leandro 
Estddillo, Lorenzo. 
Cherry, and Haywards. 

i Runs through to Niles. 
t From Niles 



7:15 A 
(•9:45 A 
10:45 A 
11:45 A 
13:45 P 
£1:45 P 
12:45 P 
£5:45 P 

7:45 P 



Coast Division (Narrow Gauge). (Foot of Market St.) 

17:45 a Santa Cruz Excursion, Santa Cruz and Principal Way 

Stations 18:05 P 

8:15 A Newark, Centervllle. San Jose, Felton, Boulder Creek, Santa 

Cruz and. way stations 5:50 P 

•2:16 p Newark, Centerville, San Jose, New Almaden, Felton, Boul- 
der Creek, Santa Cruz, and principal way stations *10:5Ua 

4:15p San Jose, Glenwood and way stations 9:20 A 

-74:15 p Boulder Creek and Santa Cruz ^'9:20 A 



CREEK ROUTE FERRY. 

From San Francisco— Foot of Market street (Slip 8) 
11:00 a m., 11:00, *2:00. 13:00. «4:00, 15:00 and *6:00p. m. 

From Oakland— Foot of Broadway.— *6:00, 8:00, 10:00 a. m 
12:00, «3:00,t4:00 *5 :00p.m. 

Coast Division (Broad Gauge). {Third and Townsend streets). 



•7:15, 9:00, and 
tl2:00,*l:00, 



•7 00 a 
t7:3UA 



10:40 a 
11 :80 a 

•2:45 P 



San Jose and way stations (New Almaden Wednesdays only) 1 :30 p 
Sunday Excursion for San Jose, Santa Cruz, Pacific Grove, 

and Principal Way Stations !8:35p 

San Jose, Tres Pinos, Santa Cruz, Pacific Grove, Paso Robles 

San Luis Obispo, Guadalupe, Surf and prlnclpalway stations 4:10 1 

SanJose and waystations *8:00a 

San Jose and way stations »... *8:35 a 

San Mateo, Redwood, Menlo Park, Palo Alto, Santa Clara, 
San Jose. Gilroy, Hollister, Santa Cruz, Salinas, Mon- 
terey and Pacific Grove *10: r 6 *. 

*3 30 p SanJose and Way Stations *9:0u A 

•4 :15p San Jose and Principal Way Stations 9:45 a 

*5:00p San Jose and Principal Way Stations 6:85a 

6 :80 p San Jose and principal way stations 5 30 p 

6:30p SanJose and way stations 7:30p 

til :45p San Jose and way stations 7:3'ip 

Afor Morning, p for Arternoon. *Sundays excepted. fSaturdays only. 

ISundays only, 

aSaturdays andSmdays. 3 Sundays and Mondays. 

The Pacific Transfer Company will call for and cheok baggage from 
hotels and residences. Enquire of Ticket Agents for Time Cards and 
other Information. 

Occidental and Oriental Steamship Co. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Steamers leave wharf, PIKST ahd BEANNAN STREETS, at 1 f m., lor 

YOKOHAMA AND HONGKONG. 

oalllng at Kobe (Hio£o), Nagasaki and Shanghai, and connecting at 
Hongkong with steamers tor India, etc No cargo received on board on 
day of sailing. 

DORIC (via Honolulu) Saturday. August 13, 1898 

Bblqig (via Honolulu) Saturday, September 3, 1898 

Coptic (via Honolulu) Thursday. Sept. £2. Ir98 

Gaelic (via Hono ulu) Tuesday, October 11, 1898 

Round Trip Tickets at reduced Rates 

for freight or passage apply at Company's Office, No. 421 Market street, 
oomerFirst. D. D. STUBBS, General Manager. 



San Francisco and North Pacific R'y Co. 



$»* FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. TlBOROK FIBHT- Foot of MarketSlroot. 

WEEK DAYS-7 SO, 9:00. 11:00 a M; 18:96, 8:S0 6:10. «:» P u. Tnursdayi- 
Eitra Irlpat 11:30 P M Saturdays— Eilri trips at l :60 and 1 1 :30 p u 
SUNDAYS— 0.00.9:90. 11:00 A H: 1:30. 8:80, 6:00, 8:80 PU. 

SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO. 

WEEK DAYS-*: 10, 7:60. 9:20, 11:10 AH: 12:46. 8:«0,6:IOPll. Saturdayi- 

Eitra trips at 1 :66 and 0.36 P u. 

SUNDAYS— 8:10. 9:40. 11:10 AM; 1:40, 840, 6:00. 8:25 P u. 

Between Sao Francisco and Schuetzen Park, same schedule as above. 



LEAVE 


S. F. 


In Effoct June 26. 1898 


Arrive ins. F. 


Week Days. 


Sundays. 


Destination. 


Sundays 

10:40 am j 
6:10 pm 

7 :.•» p y 


Week Days 


7:30a ll 
8:30 PM 
6:10PM 


8:00 am 
9:30am 
5:00pm 


Novato, 
Petaluma, 
Santa Rosa. 


8:40 A M 
10:25 A M 
6:88 p M 


7:30 am 
8:80 PM 


8:00 am 


Fulton, Windsor, 

Healdsburg, 

Geyserville. Cloverdale 


7:85 PM 


10:25 A M 
6:22 P M 


7:30 am 
3:30 PM 


8:00 am 


Hopland, Ukiah 


7:85 PM 


10:26 A M 
6 :22 P M 


7:30a m 
3:30pm 


8:00AM 


Guernevllle. 


7:35pm 


10:25 A M 
6:22 P M 


7:30 am 
5:10pm 


8:00am 
5:00 pm 


Sonoma, 
Glen Ellen. 


10:40 AM 

6 : 10 p M 


8:40 A M 
6:22 p M 



3:30PM 



8:0Oam 
5:00 PM 



Sebastopol. 



10:40 am 
7:35 PM 



10:25 A M 
6:22 p M 



Stages connect at Santa Rosa for Mark West Springs: at Lytton for 
Lytton Springs; at GeyservlllP for Skaggs' Springs; at Cloverdale for the 
Geysers; at Hopland for Duncan Springs. Highland Springs, Kelsey- 
vllle. Carlsbad Springs, Soda Bay, Lakeport, and Bartlett Springs; at 
Uklah, for Vichy Springs, Saratoga Springs. Blue Lakes, Laurel Del 
Lake. Upper Lake, Porno, Potter Valley, John Day's, Riverside, Ller- 
ley's. Bucknell's Sanhedrln Heights, Hullvllle, Booneville, Orr's Springs, 
Mendocino City, Ft. Bragg. Westport, Usal. 

Saturday-to-Monday Round Trip Tickets at reduced rates. On Sundays, 
Round Trip Tickets to all points beyond San Rafael at half rates. 

TICKET OFFICE— 650 Market St., Chronicle Building. 

A. W. FOSTER, Pres. & Gen. Manager. R. X. RYAN, Gen. Pass . Agent. 

The Most Comfortable Way to Travel 



Santa re 
Route 



ACROSS THE CONTINENT. 

Through Pullman Palace and Tourist Sleep- 
ing Cars every day. Meals at Harvey's fam- 
ous dining rooms. Get full particulars at 
Ticket office, 644 Market street, San Fran- 
cisco, and 1118 Broadway, Oakland, Cal. 




Pacific Coast Steamship Co. w^^'Tan^r 7 

For Alaskan ports. 10 a. m. July 25, 30; August 4, 9, 14, 
19, 24; transfer at Seattle. 

For Alaskan ports (from Folsom St. wharf) 10 A. M., 
August 3. 23; transfer at Portland, Or 

For H. C. and Puget Sound Ports, 1C a. m., July 5, 
10. 15. 20, 2r>, 30; Aug, 4, and every fifth day thereafter. 

For Eureka (Humboldt Bay) 10 A. M., July 1, 7, 13, 19, 
25. 31 ; August 6, and every sixth day thereafter. 
For Newport (Los Angeles) and way ports, 9 a. m. July 
4,8 12. ifi, 2>, 24 28: August 1, and every fourth day thereafter. 

Forrtan Diego stopping only at Port Harford, Santa Barbara, Port Lob 
Angeles, Redondo, {Los Angeles) 11 A. M., July 2,6. 10, 14, 18, 22, 26, 30; 
August 3, and every fourth day thereafter. 
For Mexican pnrts, 10 a. m.. 18th of every month. 
For further Information obtain folder. 

The company reserves the right to change, without previous notice, 
steamers, sailing dates, and hours of sailing. 

TICKET OFFICE— No. 4 New Montgomery street. (Palace Hotel.) 

G00DALL, PERKINS & CO., Gen. Agts., 10 Market St., San Francisco 



EAN1C 




(gmpaifij- 



SS "Mariposa," Wednesday Aug. 10th, at 2 p m. 
Line to Coolgardie, Australia, and Capetown 
South Africa. 

J. EC SPRECKELS & BROS . CO. 

Agents, 114 Montgomery St. Freight offloe, 327 
Market St., San Francisco. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Gould & Cu- Sliver Mining Company. 

Assessment No. 84 

Amount per Share 10 cents 

Levied July 7, 1898 

Delinquent in Office .., August 8, 18P8 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock August 29, 18U8 

ALFRED K. DURBROW, Secretary. 
Office— Room 69, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 30 1898 



PERSONALIS. 



Mr. Oscar S. Straus, formerly Minister to Turkey, 

has been re-appointed to that post, in which he made an 
excellent record, by President McKinley. His appoint- 
ment is made noteworthy by the fact that he is a Demo- 
crat. Like so many other of Mr. McKinley's chief diplo- 
matic appointees, Mr. Straus is a man-of-letters, being 
the author of "The Origin of the Republican Form of 
Government in the United States," a life of Roger 
Williams, "The Development of Religious Liberty in the 
United States," various periodical articles, a treatise on 
"The Reform of the Diplomatic Service" and another deal- 
ing with the Venezuelan controversy. He is President of 
the American Jewish Historical Association. 

Of rear admirals on the active list Kirkland retires 

July 3, Norton August 10, Sicard September 30, Matthews 
October 24, Miller November 22, and Bunce November 25 
of this year. As Admiral Dewey does not retire until 
December 26, 1899, he will be at the head of the navy next 
year. 

The Pope is a remarkably good chess player; in 

fact, it is only on rare occasions that he is defeated at the 
game. There is one priest in Rome who is usually the 
Pope's adversary. The priest— Father Giella— has played 
chess with him for thirty-two years past. 

It is reported that the prince of Wales will pay a 

visit next September to Hungary (where he has not been 
for 12 years), and will be the guest of the Archduke 
Frederick at his splendid domain of Bellye, where there is 
to be a grand hunt. 

When annoyed or excited, the Prince of Wales winks 

his left eye rapidly, the Emperor of Austria puffs out his 
cheeks, the Czar lays his hand flat on the top ol his head, 
and the Sultan of Turkey grasps his throat tightly with 
his hand. 

Prince Ruprecht of Bavaria is an ardent student of 

antiquities. He takes a special interest in the Antiquarian 
Society of Munich, and has just published a treatise on the 
ruined city of Gerasa, in Syria, which he visited last year. 

The Queen of Denmark is very fond of painting altar- 
pieces. One of the most beautiful of her works is the altar 
piece in the church of Gjentofte. It represents Christ 
walking upon the waters. 

The Grand Duke Paul Alexandrovitch, uncle of the 

Emperor of Russia, is so tall that he can never find a bed 
big enough to hold him. Wherever he goes, therefore, he 
is obliged to carry his bed with bim. 

Mark Twain is still the literary lion of Vienna. No 

kind of an entertainment is complete without his presence. 
He is the fad, not only of the English and American col- 
ony, but of Viennese society as well. 

Joseph Earle Stevens of Boston, who recently spent 

two years in the Philippine islands, in a lecture on the is- 
lands paid a high tribute to the honesty and ability of the 
Chinese merchants in Manila. 

Miss Hastie, an Australian woman, purposes to ex- 
plore the Solomon islands, the home of the fiercest canni- 
bals known. Hitherto white men have been able to pene- 
trate only a few miles inland. 

Lieutenant-General Bernardo Augusti, governor- 
general of the Philippines, gained his experience of war in 
the suppression of the last Carlist rebellion in Spain. 

Gen. Wolseley, who is himself an Irishman, says 

that Gen. Sir Herbert Kitchener is an Irishman, and "the 
most rising soldier in Europe." 

It is reported that Miss Marie Van Zandt, the 

American soprano, is to marry a Russian nobleman. 

Mils. Emily h. Eastman, artist, Invites ber friends and patrons to 
visit her at her studio, 1035 Market street opposite O'Brien's. 



When plaviug poker drink Jackson's Nana Soda. 



^JunriER Resorts 



ggg/A- 



Jiot^l |;l pa$o d<? I^obl<?8 



Under new management 



BEST CURATIVE 
AND BATHINO 

WATERS 

IN AMERICA 

Cuisine First Class. 



Appointments unsurpassed. Tub, plunre.mud 
and swimming baths in most powerful sul- 
phur waters in the world. It suring quick 
and permanent cures for rheumatism, liver, 
kidney and skin diseases. Magoitlcent re- 
treat for pleasure and recreation. Very hot 
sulphur Mud Baths, ls2 F. ; Soda Springs, 
77 F.; main Sulphur Sprinjr. Hi? F. Terms 
$10 to $28 per week Two blocks from rail- 
road station. Funber particulars apply to 
Traveler, 20 Montgomery street, or 
Otto E. Never, Prop., Paso Robles, Cal. 



Hotels Qazad^rO arid Eliffl C"OU^. Manage- 
IN BEAUTIFUL SONOMA COUNTY 



Gateway to Paradise, at terminuR North 
Paciflo Coast R. R. No staging: only ten 
miles fn m ocean; hotels short mile apart 
under one management; best of attention, 
bowling riding, tennis, driving, HshinK, 
shooting and outdoor swimming Open 
all year. Rates, $K to #14 per week. 
Further particulars, 
F. M. Child, Manager, Cazadero. 

Or at &04 Kearny 






trtet, S. P., 
CALIFORNIA 5 IDEAL BIG TREE AND FAVORITE RESORT. 



to 



Byror? 



Bjion Hot Springs, Contia Costa Co., 
Cal., is run on scientific sanitary 
methods. Great improvements. 
new rooms, lighted by gas, new 
swimming tant of warm mineral 
water Best lesort for health or 
pleasure. 3 hours' ride. Rates 
low. Address, 



A. BETTENS, MANAGER. 



pacific; Qor^r^ss s P ril ?gs. ^ 

SANTA CRUZ MOUNTAINS, 
SANTA CLARA COUNTY. 

Remodeled and under new management. 

A new swimming tank has juit been completed--175x80 ft. 

It takes o hours and 2. dollars to get there. 

JCHN S. MATHESON, Manager. 



I^JBISOfl 5pr^(js 

On Rubicon River, 10 miles from 

McKfnney's, LAKE TAHOE. 

Primitive, clean h* me cooking. 
New management: new furnishing; 
new stage*: tine fishing ano boating 
on river and lakes; the drive to the 
springs is the most picturesque for 
est drive In California. Tnese springs 
are n<Hed for medicinal value in stom- 
ach, liver, and kidney troubles, and 
relief for obesity. 

•7 to 10 per week 

A. ABBOTT, Manager, 




The Discoverer of Rubicon Sprints. 



COAL . J. C WILSON & CO. 



900 Battery Street. 4 family trade 


RING DP MAIN 1S64. 2 A SPECIALTY 



Price per Copy, 10 Cents. 



Annual Subscription. $4.00 








Vol.LVII. 



SAN FRANCISCO, AUGUST 6. 1898. 



Number 6. 



Printed and published every Saturday by the proprietor. FRED MARRlttTT 
b% Kearny tlreet, San Francisco. Entered at San Francisco Post- 
ojlce at Second class Matter. 

The office of the SEWS LETTER in Xeic York City is at Temple Court; 
and at Chicago, 903 Boyce Building t Frank E Morrison, Eastern 
Representative) where information may be obtained regarding subscrip- 
tion and advertising rate*. 

THERE are 1326 men at Camp Barrett, in Oakland, 
and but two of them have been intoxicated within the 
past three weeks. It may be also added that there is no 
sickness at that camp. Evidently the only similarity be- 
tween Camp Barrett and Camp Merritt is to be found in 
the names. 

NO surprise need be expressed that General John H. 
Dickinson has declared himself a candidate for Gov- 
ernor. This patriot for revenue has so long been in the 
habit of taking everything in sight that it is but natural 
that he should desire to annex the Governorship. If by 
any conceivable calamity he should ever get that office, 
there is no doubt that the State Capitol buildings and 
vaults would still remain upon his relegation to the obscurity 
of private life. 

THE discovery has been made that fifty new school- 
houses will be wanted to accommodate the children of 
this city who desire to go to school. These buildings would 
cost in the neighborhood of $1,500,000. It is idle to expect 
that anything will be done to permanently meet these re- 
quirements at present. The money is not in hand, and 
the people who would have to put it up have no stomach 
to trust the present Board of Education with the expendi- 
ture of anything more valuable than their breath. 

JUDGING by the past, it will be a gooa while before the 
Hall of Justice on Kearny street will be ready for oc- 
cupancy; but even now it is understood that the building is 
inadequate for the purposes for which it was intended. 
The receiving hospital that was to have been located there 
is to be crowded out by the police department; and the 
present quarters at the City Hall are urged by Chief Lees 
for permanent use. The people's money, as usual, will be 
paid for something they will not get, and the robbers and 
the ring will fill their pockets with money they never 
earned. 

THEODORE ROOSEVELT, from this time on, is to be 
a factor in New York State politics, and a little later 
a name to conjure with on the Republican national ticket 
for Vice-President. It is by no means certain that he 
will not be the next Governor of the Empire State. If he 
secures the nomination his election is foregone. Roose- 
velt is prodigiously popular East, aud as a man and citizen 
justly so. As Governor he would be the logical running 
mate of McKinley, who in all human probability will be re- 
nominated. It will be a good plan to keep one's eye on 
Teddy Roosevelt. 

M INISTERS of the Christian Church did a very Christian 
]" act at Santa Cruz when they disbarred the "Rever- 
end" Edwards Davis from further fellowship, and uttered a 
warning to all the followers of Christ everywhere against 
the Davis person. It is strange, however, that any warn- 
ing should be necessary to intelligent people, that is, those 
who have fairly good eyesight. The Rev. Davis has not 
the physiognomy of a minister. His bearing and the_"cut 
of his jib" do not give him the appearance of a candidate 
for heaven. Since gambling is become fashionable at 
Sausalito Davis' face would harmonize beautifully with the 
rarified atmosphere of that delightful suburb. 



SEVERAL very serious accidents have resulted from 
the giving of cartridges by soldiers to little children 
out at the camps. In one instance a child was given a Jor- 

fensen shell, and with that fatal curiosity that might 
ave been anticipated, proceeded to explode it. The re- 
sult was the immediate loss of one eye and the injury of 
the other, which in time may destroy it. It is true that 
the persistent assaults upon the soldiers for buttons, by 
silly, sentimental girls and sillier women, have reduced the 
most of them to the use of old nails and wooden pegs, but 
there should be a strictly enforced regulation against giv- 
ing loaded cartridges to children. The soldier who would 
place in a child's hands the weapon to blow its eyes out or 
its head off should be sent to the guard house on a diet of 
bread and water. 



GOLD continues to come from Alaska, but the quantity 
is far below estimates made earlier in the season. 
Not more than six millions have thus far been accounted 
for, and we are practically at the middle of August. The 
steamer Manuense arrived at Victoria on Wednesday with 
about $3.000,000— by far the largest sum brought out by 
any single vessel. It looks now as if $10,000,000 would be 
much nearer the limit than twice that amount — freely pre- 
dicted by men who should have been able to make reason- 
ably accurate estimates. Nothing is more certain than 
that there are large quantities of gold in Alaska — and also 
that a great deal of it will remain there. There will be no 
more grand rushes into the frozen North, and men who go 
there without considerable means will in the main see hard 
times in getting back to a temperate climate. 

AT the meeting of the Democratic committee of one 
hundred last Tuesday evening, it was finally deter- 
mined that no primaries should be held, but that the 150- 
delegates to the State Convention at Sacramento should 
be appointed. There is little doubt that the plan of ignor- 
ing the people and appointing delegates will be resented 
by a great many persons; but as a matter of fact our 
primary elections are transparent farces. Not one time 
in a hundred is there a free ballot and a fair count. The 
boxes are stuffed, the people swindled and the politicians 
fattened. That such a condition exists is due to the 
apathy of the better element in the community. If primary 
elections were attended by citizens as they should be, 
there would be few bad nominations, and the trade of the 
politician would be at an end. If we are to take the med- 
icine that the bosses give us, anyhow, there is no occasion 
to superficially sweeten the dose by a thin veneer of 
virtue. 

STEAM whistle vs. cannon — Examiner vs. Call, and the 
people with imprecations both loud and deep against 
both of them. The Examiner accepts any challenge ex- 
cepting that of virtue, any defi excepting that which leads 
to decency in journalism. The Call hoisted a little cannon 
up to its dome, and evoked the rage of citizens whenever it 
signaled the coming or going of troops. The Call had a 
cannon and made more noise than the yellow drab. It 
roared louder than the Hearstling, whose chief loudness is 
its malodorous scent. Having no dome in which to plant 
an ear-splitting, nerve-shattering gun, the Examiner 
has erected another instrument of torture — a steam 
whistle, and from the top of its building can set up a din 
that would waken the dead. It can touch the whole gamut 
of damnable discord — even as the yellow journal is a daily 
illustration of everything that is prurient and vicious in 
newspaperdom. The limit has been reached. Now let 
the authorities step in and abate this clamorous nuisance. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 6, 1898. 



NOW FOR PEACE, AND WHAT THEN? 

PEACE appears to be assured. Spain has gracefully" 
thrown up the sponge, has made the initial advance 
by appealing directly to' our Government for its terms, 
and, through the French Ambassador,, has earnestly sued 
for peace. She thereby concedes her inability to defend 
her sovereignty over CuDa, and it was about that sover- 
eignty that war was made between us. The President's 
reply has been officially announced and is now before the 
Madrid Cabinet, and before the world. Spain, it appears, 
is ready to accept any aDd all of the conditions offered, 
for the reason, no doubt, that nothing else is left for her to 
do, but before giving her final sanction to the President's 
terms, she has asked for an explanation of certain expres- 
sions that really do seem equivocal. The "immediate 
evacuation" of Cuba by the Spanish troops is impracticable. 
Spain has not got, and cannot command transports enough 
for an "immediate" shipping away of her forces. We 
know how that is ourselves. The troops we were to return 
to Spain are still atSantiago, and thelastof our Philippine 
expedition has not yet got away from our shores. There 
are estimated to be not fewer than 180,000 Spanish soldiers 
in Cuba. At the rate at which we have hurried up our 
men to General Merritt's assistance, it would occupy 
•nearly two years to get the last Spaniard shipped back 
from Cuba to Spain. In so ticklish a document as an ulti- 
matum, meaning either war or peace, less imperious and 
more explanatory language might profitably have been 
employed. The point made by Spain is well taken. A 
"reasonable time" for the removal of the men, is what 
ought to have been specified. A more important matter, 
however, is the language in which the Philippines are 
dealt with. The President demands that the United 
States "shall occupy and hold the city, bay and harbor of 
Manila, pending the conclusion of a treaty of peace, which 
shall determine the control, disposition, and government 
of the Philippines." Manifestly, that is not a definite de- 
mand. It would seem to mean that we are only to occupy 
Manila pending the signing of a formal treaty of peace; 
yet it provides that that very question is hereafter to be 
determined. That is to say, the President is not ready 
yet to. declare what terms he does want. He is hesitating 
about the Philippines, and anxiously awaiting the shaping 
of public opinion. It is not a nice position to keep the 
other fellow in who is anxious to know his fate. It is only 
natural that Spain should ask to know it now. 

That we rightly estimate what the President is waiting 
for, we know upon the authority of his own Secretary of 
State. As soon as it was known in Washington that 
Madrid had concluded to ask for terms of peace, Secretary 
Day gave to the press a statement that was plainly thrown 
out as a feeler. Among other things be said: "So far as 
Cuba and Porto Rico are concerned, the Government has 
decided the Spanish flag must disappear from the Western 
Hemisphere. As to the Philippines, the President has 
firmly decided to wait until he has been able to definitely 
determine the sentiments of the country. If he thinks the 
country is in favor of retaining the islands, he will make a 
stand for that and stick to it." There is therefore, no 
mistaking why the President has for the time being put 
Spain off with an answer that may mean anything, or 
nothing, so far as the Philippine question is concerned. 
It is not a very exalted position for the President of the 
United States to be found in. He has heretofore been 
very peremptory infixing time limits upon Spain, and that 
he should himself now be, not exactly begging for time, 
but seeking it by an indirection, is, to say the least, un- 
fortunate. If Mr. McKinley has not all this time known 
what he intends to do with the Philippines, why has he 
been shipping troops there, as fast as he could press 
transports into the service to carry them? His every act 
points to the conclusion that, with Dewey's brilliant 
achievement, he caught the prevailing rage for conquest 
and annexation, but it would seem that the situation 
created by the insurgents, and the danger of foreign in- 
terference, have staggered him somewhat. In his hesita- 
tion and doubt, he turns to the country for advice and 
support. But is he not just a little too late in taking that 
course? Has he not gone on too long, and carried the 
country too far, to be able to retreat with honor? Spain 
had all she could do, before we weakened her, to suppress 



the insurgents. She cannot suppress them now with 
American arms in their hands. Our early withdrawal 
would mean rapine and slaughter for Manila and disorder 
throughout all the islands. American honor could not 
stand the shock the civilized world would feel from such an 
ending to our interference. It, therefore, results that we 
cannot now uiscus's our future policy in the Philippines, 
without having a due regard for what has already 
happened. Our first purpose in going there was to des- 
troy Montejo's fleet; that accomplished, we ought to have 
withdrawn. In landing a conquering army, we assumed 
obligations towards the Philippines like those we had al- 
ready entered upon in regard to Cuba. That is, we could 
not quit without leaving law and order behind. 

In this state of affairs, it is not surprising that the 
country does not seem in a hurry to help the President out 
of complications of his own creating. The situation, as it 
now exists, is a trying one that must be encountered by 
the administration, which alone is competent to deal with 
it. It knows its engagements with Aguinaldo, and what 
the dangers of foreign interference are, and the country 
does not. It is a situation, the responsibility for which 
should be assumed by the Executive which created it. 
The Springfield Republican well says: "This is a time 
when the President of the United States needs a firm 
mind of his own. He should be a pilot and not a mere 
drifter. The statement of the Secretary of State is an 
amazing declaration of the President's mind and purpose. 
Is there to be no strong hand at the helm with brains and 
convictions of duty behind it? Is he to be only a passenger, 
waiting for the most insistent momentary breeze of opinion 
to waft the ship of state he knows not whither?" It is 
the country that, at this particular time, needs advice, 
rather than the President. Were the conditions different; 
were the people free to express their opinion, without any 
existing entanglements, as to a new departure in the 
direction of over-the-sea possessions, we think they would 
stand by their traditional policy, avoid conquests in Asia, 
maintain the Monroe Doctrine unquestioned, and success- 
fully resist the temptation to strip Spain of even such 
alluring possessions as the Philippine islands. But if they 
have already been committed to one opposite policy be- 
yond honorable recall, they prefer that the Administration 
should determine the fact, and deal with it. 

An is Weil Presuming, as we do, at this present 
That Ends Well, time of writing, that the war is prac- 
tically over, the American people are 
to be congratulated upon the good luck that has accom- 
panied their every movement. By this we do not mean 
that luck accounts for the bravery of our army before 
Santiago, or for the magnificent work of the men behind 
the guns with Dewey and Sampson, but we do mean to 
say that invariable good fortune has followed us under 
conditions that invited failure. In the first place, the war 
ought not to have been declared until autumn. But then 
we were in hot haste, in the interests of humanity, to 
reach the reconcentrados. That was found to be easier 
said than done, and soon the alleged starvelings were for- 
gotten. This abandonment of the motive for the war 
might easily have brought us into discredit; but it has not, 
and all because good luck threw into our way opportuni- 
ties to strike such telling blows elsewhere. The undaunted 
courage and capacity with which our new recruits went to 
the front and fought, and the marvelous skill with which 
the fleets of the enemy were destroyed, caused it to be 
forgotten that we were not reaching out after the recon- 
centrados, and were not yet on our way to Havana. The 
amount of sickness now before Santiago shows plainly that 
it would have been madness to attempt to take the Cuban 
capital before autumn. Afourmonths' wait would have been 
both costly and humiliating, and in the end Havana would 
still have remained to be taken, and, we may be sure, at a 
terrible sacrifice. Now peace comes, and the glory re- 
mains with us of having fought a short, sharp and decisive 
war to a most successful end. In war, as well as iu other 
conditions of life, it is better to be born lucky than rich. 
It was sheer good luck that gave Shatter Santiago at a 
time when he was in imminent peril. It is no secret at 
the front that he thought his position before that city un- 
tenable, and favored a retreat. His principal officers ad- 
vised putting on a bold front and making a demand for a 



PANORAMIC SER'ES. PLATE 104. 



WITH S. F. NEWS LETTER. AUGUST 6. 1898 




PICTURESQUE SAN FRANCISCO. 

VIEWS IN PROPOSED MISSION PARK AND ZOO. 



August 6, 1898. 



SAX FRANCIS< NEWS LETTER 



surrender. The bluff wod, and we were spared the serious 
coDsequeuces that seemed inevitable. That Tofal just 
then decided to lay down his hand, was to us a j>;- 
great good luck. "That Cervera put himself in a j 
where he could be, and was, "bottled up" was another 
stroke of good fortune for our side. That he was ordered 
out of Santiago bay, just when he ought to have stopped 
in, was playing into our hands in a way we had no riirlu to 
expect. He was harassing our troops where he was, and 
keeping our ships at a safe distance. Whilst being where 
he could do us the most harm, he was ordered out, and 
went, as he said, to "his doom." Spain is about to stand 
aside and we are to take her place. In our new attitude 
it is to be hoped that good fortune will still continue with 
us. New problems and new opponents are likeiy to con- 
front us. Aguinaldo in the Philippines, and Garcia and 
Gomez in Cuba, will either do as they please, or tight. 
What shall we do? A writer in an English review savs: 
"The Americans will get out of Cuba and the Philippines 
when England gets out of Egypt, and France out of 
Tunis," which, being interpreted, means that we shall not 
get out at all. 

Wens Fargo and A very distinct and persistent effort 

the Stamp Tax. has been made in San Francisco to 
create a prejudice against Wells 
Fargo's Express Company because of its refusal to pay 
the war revenue tax upon packages carried by it, until 
the courts have interpreted the law; and the local officers 
of the company have been the subject of pointed and mani- 
festly unfair criticism in the public prints. The effect of 
all, or nearly all, taxation, is to make the thing purchased, 
under its provisions, cost the final buyer more. Taxes of 
all kinds are figured by the merchant precisely as a part 
of his running expenses— his fixed charges — and are no 
different in this respect from his insurance, his rents, and 
first cost of his stock. This is the unvarying rule; any- 
thing else is the rare exception. 

The language of the new law is by no means clear. It 
is often obscure, almost always ambiguous, rarely explicit. 
It fails to specify who shall buy the stamp indicated. It de- 
clares that the person, firm, or corporation owning or 
operating a telephone line shall pay the tax; but with 
telegrams the law prohibits the companies from sending 
messages unless an adhesive stamp has first been affixed 
to them. On money orders issued by the United States, 
fees corresponding to the value of the stamp are charged; 
and on bank paper it is declared that they shall bear a 
2-cent stamp. On deeds and other legal papers — without 
respect to the agent through whom the business may 
be done — the individual pays the tax. 

In a recent communication United States Attorney- 
General John W. Griggs upheld the contention of the 
express people. His letter was in reply to the inquiry of 
an agent in Texas, wherein a Pacific Express Company's 
receipt had been submitted, asking if the requirement of 
that company to pay the revenue tax was not a violation 
of the internal revenue law. In substance the Attorney- 
General said: "It is not the function of the Government 
to decide as between the Express Company and the 
shipper which shall pay the tax, the Government being 
insistent only that the tax shall be paid by some one." On 
the 29 th of July also, the following instructions were tele- 
graphed to the Los Angeles District Attorney: "It is not 
a violation of the revenue act for a carrier to refuse to 
accept merchandise for shipment. The penalty accrues 
if goods are accepted for shipment and the carrier fails to 
issue a bill of lading or manifest without the stamp. 
Prosecutions should not begin unless the laws of the 
United States are violated." 

Thus it will be seen that where the original party to the 
transaction is not explicitly directed to pay the tax, the 
act is ambiguous and doubtful, or decidedly in favor of the 
contention now maintained by the express company that 
the people who send packages by it shall pay for the 
stamps necessary to compliance with the law. Suits have 
been brought to compel the company to pay for the revenue 
stamps, and pending their determination Wells Fargo refuse 
to meet this added charge. It is pointed out that the rail- 
ways of the country have paid this tax, notwithstanding 
the fact that the legal conditions are parallel. But the 
practical effect of their application would be manifestly un- 



equal. In his letter to the Merchants' Association of this 
city. President Valentine, >>f Wells, forgo A Company, 

very clearly covered the ground when he Bald: "A bill of 

lading for a train load of structural iron or miscellaneous 
hardware, to one consignee, from Pittsburg to San Fran- 
or a train load of tea or raw silk, to one consignee, 
San Francisco to New York or Boston, valued at hun- 
dreds of thousands of dollars requires only a one-cent 
stamp. Yet a package valued at one dollar going from 
San Francisco to Chicago, or Los Angeles to New Or- 
leans, or Kansas City to Topeka, or Galveston to Hous- 
ton, with charges of 2!> cents, requires the same, to wit, a 
one-cent stamp. Here it is seen why railroad companies 
raised no question as to a tax which, if paid by the express 
companies, would be a most serious burden." Incidentally 
it may be stated that Wells Fargo have paid a war tax of 
$13,000 — equal to $2 per thousand on the cash capital and 
surplus of the company. If all the property of the country 
were placed upon the same basis, it is interesting to know 
that it would at once raise a fund of more than 170 million 
dollars. Further, were the same rate of taxation that is 
imposed on the express business uniformly gathered from 
the entire commerce of the country, it would mean from 
five hundred millions to 1000 million dollars, according to 
what might be deemed commerce. These conditions make 
reasonable the attitude of the company. The merchants of 
San Francisco very naturally think that the express peo- 
ple and not themselves should . pay the war tax; but it is 
entirely pertinent to ask if they were expected to sell 
goods affected by the new law at old rates, what their at- 
titude would be? When the courts make clear the meaning 
of the new revenue law there can be no doubt that the ex-, 
press companies of the country will cheerfully and promptly 
comply with it. 

Finally, it is in order to ask these papers that are 
criticising the express companies how much it costs them 
to maintain a war for which many of them are largely re- 
sponsible? And if compelled to pay 3 per cent, of their 
gross daily earnings to support our armies and fleets, what 
response they would make ? 

The Death of Otto Von Bismarck was called upon 
Prince Bismarck, to take a leading part in mighty 
affairs, and that he filled the bill, and 
acted his part with a perfection that probably no other 
living man could have equaled, is saying much, and is, 
perhaps, saying all that the truth justifies, or justice de- 
mands. The writers of the period are comparing his life 
work unfavorably with that of Gladstone and of Cavour. 
But the comparisons are unfair. The conditions are not 
at all alike. The tasks which the three men found it to 
their hand to accomplish were about as dissimilar as they 
well could be. In leading the English people along the 
paths of great moral, domestic and social reforms there 
was nothing in common with the work of welding the 
bickering, jealous, self-defeating German Principalities in- 
to a United Fatherland. Both ends were noble in their 
conception and grand in their execution, and have bettered 
the world for having been accomplished. But Gladstone 
could not have united Germany, because he was the very 
impersonation of moral suasion, which had long failed to 
bnng the Principalities to anything like a common under- 
standing. It took a war, and a great war at that, to 
bring the German people together in a realization of the 
fact that in union alone was there that strength for them 
in Europe that could render their position tenable. In the 
presence of a common danger they were quick to discern 
their common interests. War is a wonderful provoker of 
prompt judgments along the lines of national interests and 
safety. The war with France cleared the German vision, 
and gave it to see wherein its true interests consisted. 
Bismarck foresaw that result, and worked for it, and was 
masterful in causing things to trend in the direction he 
desired. He was quick to seize the opportunity Napoleon 
III. offered him, and with a firmness and mastery of events 
never surpassed, he shaped the destinies of his country, 
and gave her that unity which alone she lacked to become 
the first power of Continental Europe. Gladstone would 
not have made such a war, even to achieve such desirable 
results. In short, he was not a man of "blood and iron." 
His powers were forensic, academic and scholarly, and 
these qualities, being under the supreme control of a high 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 6, [898. 



and acute moral sense, made him always strong as a re- 
former, but often weak as a ruler. Bismarck would not, 
in the face of defeat have returned the Transvaal to the 
Boers, nor have promised to get out of Egypt, nor have 
left Gordon to his fate in the Soudan. On the other hand, 
he would not have given power to the masses and removed 
all danger from England of that socialism that now 
threatens to inundate Germany; nor would he have given 
up the Ionian Islands to Italy or Helgoland to its original 
owners; much less have suggested that Gibraltar be re- 
turned to the Spanish. Certainly, he would not have 
tried to pacify Ireland in rebellion by endeavoring to give 
her the power to be still more rebellious. That was not 
his way. He was pre-eminently the representative of 
forces: — Gladstone was a lover and a master of moral 
suasion. Each was suited to the work he had to do. 
Bismarck made Germany strong and feared in a military 
sense; Gladstone did more for England — he made her 
respected for her sense of justice and equity. We have 
spoken in the earlier part of this article of the quick 
judgments Germany adopted during her war with France. 
It looks as if the people of the United States were under- 
going a similar experience during their present war with 
Spain. So far, the Bismarckian policy of force has had 
full sway and won glory and renown, which is very well in 
its way, but now the time has arrived when a little of the 
spirit of Gladstone may fittingly be given prominence. 

The Cuban The Sacramento Bee reviles the News 
"Patriots " Letter for having recently described the 
Cubans as " utterly worthless" and "never 
anything better than a set of banditti," and asks the public 
to "compare this billingsgate with the manly utterances 
of General Shafter in his reply to General Garcia's letter," 
to wit : " Full credit has been given you and your valiant 
men in my report to my Government, and I wish to ac- 
knowledge to you the gi eat and valuable assistance you 
rendered during the campaign." The Bee is unfortunate 
in its quotation, for it is now generally admitted by every 
intelligent man in the country that Shafter spoke of Gar- 
cia's work in a purely diplomatic way. He was not telling 
the truth, and recognized the fact that the people of Amer- 
ica would understand the delicate position he occupied. To 
have plainly told the bandit chief just how contemptible 
his assistance had been and what his brigands were thought 
of by American soldiers, would have forever put an end to 
all hope of friendly relations between the Cuban "patriots" 
and the army of occupation. 

Since the Stars and Stripes were planted on Cuban soil 
everything the News Letter before that time had said of 
the Cubans is shown to have been gross flattery. We 
knew the Cuban "patriots" were utterly incapable of self- 
government; knew their straggling armies were merely 
roving bands of foragers, who lived by the aid of their 
machettes and muskets; knew they burned the property 
of inoffensive people, killed and carried away stock that 
didn't belong to them, and conducted themselves in a 
wholly irresponsible, half-civilized and brigandish manner. 
What do tie facts show since Cuban soil has been watered 
by the blood of American soldiers? Simply that the Cuban 
"patriots" are ingrates, cowards, thieves, and murderers. 
Before Santiago they failed to perform services of the 
least importance. They refused to help build roads, pack 
supplies, or care for the wounded. The}' were engaged in 
stealing provisions before the battle of Santiago, and after 
it were engaged in robbing the dead. They fired volleys 
of lead into the corpses of dead Spaniards, and had to be 
restrained from slaughtering prisoners of war. These 
things have been proved beyond question in any reputable 
source, and show that the brave fellows who perished on 
Cuban soil in an endeavor to freeits people from the grasp 
of Spain were worth a million times all the "patriots" that 
ever applied a torch to growing cane or waved arnachette 
in defense of "Cuba libre." If theopinionsof a newspaper 
upon any question were ever vindicated the utterances of 
the News Letter as to the worthless, vicious character of 
the Cuban patriots " have been a thousand times verified. 

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August 6. 1898. 



SAX FRANCISCO NI-WS LETTKR. 




RACONTEURS OF THE CLUBS. 

MR. Georpe T. Marye is one of the best-groomed club- 
men in San Francisco. Mr. Marve. as a raconteur, 
is precise yet fluent, and he does not dwell too long upon 
the introductory portions of his narrative, which is a com- 
mon fault with many other wise story-tellers. Mr. Ha 
ktalesareof society, the incidents and adventures of" the 
'members of the upper ten, their loves, virtues, and 
vices. One of his most entertaining, and, indeed, most 
recent, has for its hero a young clubman, whose name 
it would be unkind to mention. He is rich and harm- 
less, and unless when under the influence of the juice of 
the grape, modest and discreet. But when he has a 
quart or so under his belt, he will, as he himself confesses, 
chase a petticoat a mile. Now, it so happened, as Mr. 
Marye relates, that this gay cavalier, on his way home 
from the club a few nights ago, sighted, as the sailors would 
say, a strange and very dainty craft in the offing. He 
made chase at once, but the stranger crowded on more 
sail and began to leave him astern. 
The clubman threw more canvas to the 
breeze and succeeded in overhauling 
what a single glance showed to be a 
very handsome young woman. He 
spoke to her, but she turned swiftly 
aside, and shot off in another direction. 
Nothing discouraged, the clubman still 
pursued her, and when she walked up 
the steps of a house on Jones street he 
followed. She opened the door an<| 
slipped in, "with the infatuated clubman 
still in pursuit, and so into a drawing- 
room brilliantly lighted. Then the 
young lady spoke: 

" You have impertinently followed me, sir, for many 
blocks. You will now amuse yourself, as best you can, 
until my husband's return," and closing the door sharply, 
she locked him in. Here was a pretty fix. There was 
little doubt bui, the infuriated husband would spoil his face 
on his return, or still worse send for a sensational reporter 
to write him up. An hour passed, and he was dozing away 
in an easy chair when the turning of the key in the lock 
aroused him. He darted behind a chair, but only the lady 
herself appeared. 

"On deliberation, sir," she said, sternly, "I have con- 
cluded to let j'ou escape this time. A person of my 
husband's physique would make mince-meat of a pigmy 
like you. Indeed, he might kill you. Go I " and he went, 
continues Mr. Marye, feeling, he swears, a sting of a boot 
as he passed out the door. Let this be a warning to all 
you young men to keep free from that absurd habit of 
chasing strange ladies on the street. 

Dan O'Connell keeps a sort of concordance of his stories, 
and such as will not admit of promiscuous relation, he 
carefully marks. Many of them lead to the startling in 
the natural history line, for he has spent much of his time 
on the sea and in the woods. 

"The educated heron " is one of this class. Mr. O'Con- 
nell relates that while on a hunting trip to British Colum- 
bia he stopped for a few days at a block house store kept 
by an old Hudson Bay trader. Like many men in that re- 
gion, he had married an Indian woman, and by her had a 
very beautiful daughter. This girl used to row Mr. 0"Con- 
nell out on Lake La Huche, a large and magnificent lake 
in that region. Here he used to catch trout during the 
day and shoot deer by moonlight. But the remarkable 
part of the story is that the Indian girl had a trained 
heron which used to accompany them and chaperon all 
those expeditions. If Lulu, the girl, forgot her handker- 
chief on the bank, the intelligent crane would fly back and 
fetch it. "And," adds O'Connell "if when changing places 
in the canoe my hand happened accidentally to touch her's, 
or rest upon her shoulder, the bird would ruffle up its 
feathers and make a vicious peck at my face. One day in 
getting ashore I leaned upon her shoulder. The insulted 
bird darted its beak into my leg, and I was lame for a week 
afterward." 

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THE ROPP STRAIGHT LINE FURNACE. 
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ENGINES, BOILERS. STEAM PUMPS. 
WOOD-WORKING AND IRON-WORKING MACHINERY. 

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ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Andes Sliver Mining Company. 
Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Loca 
tion of works—Virginia City, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 38th day of Juty, 1898, an assessment (No. 46), of five cents 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
immediately in United States gold coin to the Secretary, at the office of 
the company, rooms 20-22, Nevada Blook, 809 Montgomery St., San Fran- 
olsoo California. 
Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
2d DAY OF SEPTEMBER, 1898, 
will be delinquent, and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless 
payment Is made before will be sold on Monday, 11 a. m., the 26th day of 
September, 1898, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs 
of advertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

JOHN W. TWIGGS, Secretary. 
Office— Rooms 20-22, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery St., San Franoisco, 
Cal. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Crown Point Gold and Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, Cal. Looatlon of 
works— Gold Hill, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors of this 
company, held on the 7th day of July, 1*98, an assessment (No. 74) 
of Five cents was levied upon each and every share of the capital 
stock of said company, payable immediately to the Secretary, at the offioe 
of the company, room 35, MillB building, third floor San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 

WEDNESDAY, the 10th DAY OF AUGUST, 1898, 
will be deemed delinquent and duly advertised for sale at public auction: 
and unless payment shall be made before, * ill be sold on Wednesday, the 
3lst day of August, 1898, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with 
costs of advertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Direc- 
tors. JAMES NEWLANDS, Secretary. 

Office— Room 35. third floor. Mills building, N. E. corner Bush and Mont- 
gomery streets, San Francisco, Cal. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Loma Prieta Prune Ranch Company. 

Looatlon of principal place of business— San Francisco, Cal. Looatlon 
of ranch— Monterey County, Cal. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of DireotorB, held 
on the Thirteenth (13th) day of July, 1898, an assessmen < No. 2, of Ten 
Dollars ($10) per share was levied upon the capital stock of the 
corporation, payable immediately in United States gold coin to the Sec- 
retary, at the office of the company, 33 Post street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 

MONDAY, the 16th DAY OF AUGUST, 18HB. 
will be delinquent, and advertised for sale at public auction, ana unless 
payment is made before will be sold on Thursday, the 15th day of Sep- 
tember, 1898, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of 
advertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

GEORGE A. STORY, Secretary. 
Office: 33 Post street, San Francisco, Cal. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Gould & Cu: Sliver Mining Company. 

Assessment ,. . , No. 84 

Amount per Share , 10 oents 

Levied ,, .,., July 7, 1898 

Delinquent in Office August 8, 1898 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock August 29, 1898 

ALFRED K. DURBROW, Secretary. 
Office— Room 69, Nevada Blook, 309 Montgomery St., San Franoisco, Oal. 

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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 6, 1898. 




'P1FA5URK v#st> 

" We obey no wand but pleasure's."— Tom Moore. 

THE Tivoli grand opera season opened 
last Monday evening with a polyglot 
performance of Ait/a, — an Italian Amon- 
asro and Ramphis, an English Amneris and Radames, and 
a German Aida. There were all the signs of prosperity 
and excitement usual on such occasions in the auditorium, 
the lobby, and — (why not add?) the bar, and the first per- 
formance passed off with considerable Mat. 

It is hardly necessary to say again that during the 
grand opera season the Tivoli management gives us a 
great deal more than our money's worth, and that prob- 
ably nowhere else in the world is grand opera so hand- 
somely done at such a low charge, but for my own com- 
fort I wish to repeat the statement before proceeding to 
a detailed criticism. The ovation of the evening was ten- 
dered to Chevalier Maurice de Vries, whose splendid 
voice and art are well remembered here from his per- 
formances of two years ago. He was in fine form and 
sang the music of Amonasro with superb dramatic inten- 
sity. There were no other artists of de Vries' magnitude 
in the cast, but both Praulein Marie Brandis and Miss 
Mary Linck were very successful as Aida and Amneris. 
Both these ladies improved vastly as the opera proceeded, 
which on a first night in a strange city was only to be ex- 
pected. Fraulein Brandis was disappointing in the first 
act, for she has a good-sized reputation to sustain, she 
seemed to sing with an effort, but throughout the exact- 
ing fourth act and the dungeon duet she sang beautifully. 
Her voice is strong and resonant and her singing in these 
scenes was highly artistic. I have heard many Aidas, 
but a German one was a novelty, and to hear her respond- 
ing to her English lover and Italian parent in the language 
of the Fatherland was a trifle ludicrous. I have seen 
them all the shades of tawny, and the garb and complexion 
of the Ethiopian slave is surely the most trying that a 
prima donna was ever required to don; Fraulein Brandis's 
color scheme is also a novelty, she paints herself a rich 
brick red that suggests a Choctaw rather than an 
Ethiopian. Miss Mary Linck displayed a good mezzo- 
soprano voice and lots of dramatic temperament, and rose 
well to her great scene in the fifth act for which she re- 
ceived vast applause. Both ladies did plenty of acting 
but I confess I don't know what good operatic acting is; 
any acting in Italian opera, where it is supposed to be 
realistic, is so incongruous that the more there is of it the 
more ridiculous it is. Miss Linck certainly showed an 
appreciation of such exclusive acting chances as came in 
her way, as for instance, when Amneris crowns Radames, 
— that is about the only one. The mammoth-voiced Signor 
Wanrell was a satisfactory Ramphis, Mr. Rhys Thomas 
repeated a performance of Radames which has frequently 
been heard here before, and useful Mr. West was the 
King of Egypt. Poor Miss Mull seemed to think that as 
we couldn't see her we should have difficulty in hearing 
her, and so forced her voice with excruciating conscien- 
tiousness in the Priestess's solo. Mr. Max Hirschfeld con- 
ducted very ably, the small orchestra was capable and 
confident, and the chorus generally but not altogether 
satisfactory. In the ensembles following the return 
of Radames the altos were sadly in evidence with a 
blatant tone and flatness. But altogether it was a very 
creditable and bitchless performance of Aitln, and at fifty 
cents a head it is wonderful. 



A new cast appeared on Tuesday evening, and Lucia di 
Lammermoor drew another full house. Miss Anna Lichter 
was a good Lucia and her singing constituted the principal 
interest of the performance. She executed the florid 
music with facility in a voice of the bird type, and though 
she did not actually put the birds to shame, she aroused 
loud enthusiasm with the runs and trillas and roulades of 
the mad scene. She made no attempt to play the maniac, 
which I thought was rather sensible of her; she might in- 
deed have been upon the concert stage except that she 



wore a bedgown. In the marriage contract scene also 
her acting was of the slightest, — she was there to sing 
and she sang well. Signor Edgardo Zerni was Lord 
Edgar of Ravenswood. There was much preparatory in- 
terest in this test of his quality, as he was entirely un- 
known here and will presumably be called upon to fill the 
most important tenor roles during the season. He 
acquitted himself well in the tomb scene; his phrasing and 
enunciation admirable, but his excessive vibrato is likely 
to be a constant irritation to American audiences. The 
tenors of the present company will not make us forget our 
Michaelena. Mr. Wm. Pruette was anything but a satis- 
factory Henry Ashton. His voice is unwieldy and he 
speaks a number of phrases instead of singing them, 
probably with the idea of gaining dramatic effect, but this 
to quite an illegitimate extent, and especially in the mar- 
riage contract scene he shrieked at Lucia and scolded her 
till he gained the unintentioned titter. Mr. Schuster was 
a moderately good Raymond, and Miss Mull and Messrs. 
Boyce and West filled the small parts. Congratulations 
again to Mr. Hirschfeld and the orchestra. Lucia will 
be given this afternoon at the two-bit matinee. 

* * * 

The Frawlejs played The Masked Ball under unfortunate 
circumstances this week. Mr. Edwards, who was origi- 
nally cast for Poulard, was ill, and had to be replaced 
after the first night by Mr. Burke, who had evidently not 
had time to get up his part properly, and could do little 
with it. Due allowances, of course, ought 1o be made not 
only for Mr. Burke, but for the other actors who were 
placed at an obvious disadvantage, for it must be extremely 
disconcerting to them, as well as to the audience, to have 
the action stopped while Poulard goes to the prompter's 
entrance to get his cue, and also to have to vamp lines 
when he gives them the wrong cue, as Mr. Bell several 
times had to do the night I was there. In a play like The 
Mus/.nl Ball, which depends so much upon the nicety of its 
acting, the result of such accidents could not help being 
disastrous. Miss Buckley, Mr. Bell, and Mr. Hickman 
all entered well into the spirit of the piece, so that the first 
part of the third act, which they have to themselves, went 
with the sparkle which so many of the earlier scenes 
had needed and gone without. Miss Buckley scored 
another distinct success as Susanne, — she has a style that 
is all her own and quite delightful, and spoke her lines 
with just the right suggestion of humor. Mr. Bell's Dr. 
Blondet was equal to any of the other light comedy per- 
formances he has given here, which is to give it high 
praise. A good technique and a backing of brains make 
all Mr. Bell's acting interesting when he gets parts in 
which these equipments are of any use. Mr. Hickman 
gave a neat, clever performance of Martinot, the friend of 
Blondet, and took his right place in the scenes in which he 
appeared. Mr. Wilson was good in the small part of Ber- 
gomat, but Miss Carey failed to particularize the charac- 
ter of Mme. Poulard in accordance with her lines and 
business, which also helped to weight the performance. 
Though the Poulards and Blondets would probably not be 
people of nice taste in house decoration, the coloring of the 
first set was unnecessarily hideous and disquieting. 

* * * 

Mr. Lewis Morrison's old-school acting is exactly suited 
to Richelieu. There he can revel in stately measures and 
a strange gait to his heart's content, — in fact he must, 
and he presents a picture not a particle too highly colored 
to suit Bulwer's florid mind. The Alcazar company give 
a remarkably good performance of the play, and are cast 
with a success difficult to attain in a stock company; the 
lighting and other stage effects are worth noting for the 
intelligent care they show; especially I noticed the cres- 
cendo at the end of the third act, which was admirably 
managed. Miss Florence Roberts is a charming Julie de 
Montemar, both in the comedy scenes and the emotional 
ones, showing the resources of a thoroughly experienced 
actress. Two small parts particularly well played are the 
Sieur de Beringhen of Mr. Gordon Foster Piatt, and the 
Francois of Mr. Francis Yale, who acted his scene with 
the Cardinal in the third act very well indeed. 

* * * 

How easy it is to keep your vaudeville audience when 
you have once got it ! Mr. James Thornton gets his audi- 



August 6, 1898. 



SAN 1 R LETTER 



eoce, and has no difficulty in entertaining it with jests on 
the safe old matrimonial subject, including the 
Men, in which be often exceeds tin- 
novelties at the 1 >rpheum this week are Vail*'! 
mine, whom I didn't see. Next week come MUs I 
Burkhart. supported by Mr. Cyril Wilber. 
comedy: the three He^eimans, gymnasts; and O'Brien A 
Buckley in a musical turn. 

Fmni is to be performed complete at the Tivoli next 
Monday evening, that is, with the church scenes which are 
nearly always omitted in America. Signor Zerni will ap- 
pear as Faust, Miss Lichter as Marguerite. Signor Wan- 
rell as Mephistopheies. Miss Crox as Siebel, and M r. Pruette 
as Valentine. Faust will be repeated on Thursday and 
Sunday evenings and at the Saturday matinee, and on the 
ether evenings // Trovatore will be performed, with Frau- 
lein Brandis as Leonora, Miss Linck as Azucena. Mr. 
Rhys Thomas as Manrico, and Chevalier Maurice de Vries 
as Count di Luna. The following week Lohengrin will be 
performed, with Fraulein Brandis and Miss Linck alter- 
nating as Elsa and Ortrud. 

Next week the Frawley Company will play flits Absent 
Boy, and the week after TriWy. A good performance of 
Trill, \j may reasonably be looked forward to, as the cast 
will contain several people associated with its early suc- 
cess. Mr. Theodore Roberts was one of Palmer's first 
Syengalis, and Mr. Alfred Hickman was the original Little 
Billee. Mr. Ignace Martinetti, who played the part of 
Zou Zou at the Baldwin some seasons ago, has been 
specially engaged by Mr. Frawley. 

Richelieu will be continued till to-morrow night at the 
Alcazar, and on Monday Miss Florence Roberts will ap- 
pear as Camille and Mr. Louis Morrison as Armand Duval. 

CUCKOO I 



A FOOL there was, and he loved his booze, 
And his lemans fair and frail ; 
Bat he drew the line, if he had to choose 
'Twixt them and the altar rail: — 
'Twixt them and the altar rail, Cuckoo ! 
And the ring and the wedding bell; 

So he loved and laughed as his cup he quaffed 
On the slippery road to hell. 

All unbeguiled he serenely smiled, 

Or laughed at the siren's snare ; 
While the 'unco guid" and the undeflled, 

Were blind to the deadfall there: — 

Were blind to the deadfall there, Cuckoo ! 
As for home sweet home they yearned, 

On some snowy breast which the fool had pressed, 
Then from it lightly turned. 
This fool had learnt to draw the line, 

I've already said above ; 
For the wife and wanton should ne'er combine, 

So he clung to the lighter love:— 

So he clang to the lighter love, Cuckoo! 
And the broad and the rosy road; 

Though his feet were thorned, he was never horned, 
For he kept to his careless code. 
San Francisco, August 6, 1898. Louis A. Robertson. 

THE News Letter presents another handsome half- 
tone of several characteristic scenes at the Mission 
Park and Zoo. The view looking up the canyon towards 
the Alms House is one of the most picturesque within the 
city limits. It is through this canyon that the road con- 
necting the Mission with Golden Gate Park is to be con- 
structed. The other view is of "Seal Lake," a pretty 
spot within the limits of the proposed park, which is daily 
visited by numbers of people, and is particularly popular 
with children, especially during the time of the day when 
the seals are fed. These animals are very gentle, and they 
are rapidly becoming pets. 

Best Because Natural. 
The market is flooded with so-called baby foods. Experience dem- 
onstrates that scientifically prepared cows' milk is the best, when 
the natural supply fails. Gail Borden Eagle Brand Condensed Milk 
is the best infant food. 



In all cases of physical or mental exhaustion the' use of a little Jesse 
Moore Whiskey will be found invaluable as a stimulant. 

Jackson's Napa Soda is the finest table water in the world. 




> Mixture 

I Smokinq Tobacco ## 



T* . I' /"\ l_i Mrs. Ernestine KrellDg, 

I VOI I wDera llOUSe. Proprietor and Manager, 

Beginning Monday. August 8 h. Second week of the grand opera 
sea-on. Monday, Thursday, and Sundiy evenings, Gouuod's 
immortal opera, 

FAUST. 
Tuesday, Wednesday. Friday, and Saturday evenings, Verdi's 
popular opeia, 

IL TSOV^TORE. 
Special Saturday matinee, 

C AUST 
Special casts; new scenery; correct costumes, 
Next.: Lohengrin. 

Popular prices, 35c. and 5 ic. Telephone Bush 91 

N. B.— Reserved seats, matinee. 25c. 

CI I ' n*| j_ The "Gem" Theatreof the Coast. 

OlUmDia I neat-re, Friedlander, Gottlob&Co., Lessees 

Week of August 8ih. The Frawley Company, presenting by 
special arrangement with A. M. Palmer and Nat Goodwin the 
comedy, 

HIS ABSENT BOY. 

It's a cup of joy. 

August 15th; Great revival of Trilby. 



Orpheum. 



San Francisco's Greatest Music Hall. OTTarrell St., 
between Stockton and Powell streets. 



Week commencing Monday, August 8th. 
Eastern novelties : Direct from Europe, 



More European and 



THE HEGELMANS, 

World's greatest aerial gymnasts ; Lillian Burkhart & Co., the 
charming comedienne in a one-act play; O'Brien & Buckley, 
musical artists; James Thornton, champion songster, in a new 
act; Valbon & Anthelmine, international duettists; the Mac- 
arty sisters, equipoise marvels; the Angela sisters, new rep- 
ertoire ; W. H. Windom and Blackstone Quartette, in new selec- 
tions; Wilton & Stack, horizontal bar artists. 
Matinees Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday. 
Reserved seats 25c; balcony 10c; opera chairs and box seats 50c. 

n I T*L -L Fred Belasco, Lessee. 

rAICaZar I nea"tre. Mark Thall, Manager. 'Phone Main 254. 

To-night and to-morrow, Sunday, last two performances of 
Lewis Morrison as Richelieu. 

Monday, August Sth; loth week of Lewis Morrison. Elaborate 
production of 

GAMILLE. 

Prices: 15c, 25c,, 35c, 50c. 

d. D. SULLIVAN 

Attorney-at- Law 
Rooms 34-38, 3d Floor Chronicle Building, San Francisco. 

DR. BYRON W. HAINES 



613 Sutter Street, 
Tel. East 629. 



Dentist 



DR. d. NICHOLS, 

{Formerly County Physician of Amador County.) 
Office: alPowell street, corner Powell and Ellis. Residence, 
St. Nicholas Hotel. Market St. HourB : 1 to 4 p. m. ; 7 to 8 p. m. 
Established since 1872 in San Francisco. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 6, 1898. 




?KCR °N 



*s 



AWAY out on California street resides a prominent and 
sterling citizen whose ideas of the proprieties are as 
rigid as those of his son and heir are lax. The latter has 
a habit of wandering home at late and unusual hours 
of the night and when the old gentleman catches the 
boy in these tardy home comings, the riot act is read then 
and there. 

Sometime after midnight on Monday last, the head of 
the house was awakened by a succession of terrible bell 
ringings. Apparently the visitor was endeavoring to 
rupture the interiorelectric a-rangements of the mansion. 

The old gentleman flounced downstairs in a fury, and 
flung open the door. He has a long time since discarded 
pajamas and the wind played merrily with bn ample 
night shirt, blowing the tails of the loose garment about 
his corpulent form, like the skirts of a ballet dancer. 

" What are you standing out there for, you young 
scoundrel?" he thundered. "'Why don't you come in? 
Have you lost your latch key? What do you mean by 
bringing me down here at this hour of the night?" 

Then to his dismay, a feminine voice floated in out of the 
darkness. 

"I beg your pardon, Captain, but may I use your tele- 
phone? My daughter has been taken suddenly ill." 

"I — I — I — why — why — why — y-y-yes; — of course, — cer- 
tainly," gasped the poor old gentleman, his teeth chatter- 
ing with cold and chagrin, as he realized what a sorry 
figure he cut, before the lady. 

And when it was all over, and he climbed sadly up stairs 
again, he paused outside the door of his son's apartment, 
and heard an unmistakable snore. 

The youngster who had indirectly caused all the trouble 
had been peacefully and virtuously sleeping throughout 

the entire performance. 

* * * 

A flashy young member of the Burlingame Club whose 
gold is more in evidence than his brains cannot understand 
why the constable of San Mateo should be so suspicious 
regarding his sporting proclivities, and should, with such 
emphasis, dilate to him upon the illegality of game fight- 
ing. He is unable to comprehend why these matters can- 
not be kept within the club, and he is furious at some im- 
aginary member "who has been gossiping on the outside." 

In his reflections on the intelligence of others, which he 
gauges by his own, the callow youth is apparently un- 
mindful of the cake-walk style in which he paraded the 
grounds of the Burlingame Club last Sunday, with a game 
cock under each arm, for fear all the ladies interested in 
the club might not be fully apprised of the fact that he 
was the impresario of half-a-dozen belligerent roosters 
especially imported for the occasion from Sacramento. 

During the contest between the birds, his disposition to 
interpret the rules of the pit in favor of that cock on which 
he and his friends had placed their money, have earned 
for him a new sobriquet. 

It is Prince Cunning now. 



That hard working artist, Charles Rollo Peters, was 
entertaining half-a-dozen guests whose unsuppressed ad- 
miration of his society became a trifle hard to bear, inas- 
much as the clock had just struck three, and more parti- 
cularly in view of the fact that Peters was the only sleepy, 
and at the same time, the nearest approach to a sober 
man, of all the merry company. In desperation, he 
drowsily propounded a pertinent conundrum to his jovial 
companions. 

"Why," asked Charlie. "Why is sleep like a love of 
painting?" 

No one could think of the answer which, of course, was: 

"It induces every man to take to & pallet." 



Flamingo Moseley is the way in which the gentlemen 
who are so careful of each other's sensitivenesses on the 
floor of the Call Board Room now talk of the quiet and self- 
contained Andrew. 

If it were not for his previous record of dressing in un- 
impeachable taste, the shock caused by his appearance in 
an immense Ascot necktie of a shade suggesting an 
August sunset in the neighborhood of Fresno, would not 
be so trying. As it was, everybody ran for cover, when 
Moseley suddenly burst upon the Produce Exchange in all 
the refulgent glory of his untamed, socialistic cravat. His 
partner, Ed. Cutter, vehemently expostulated, maintain- 
ing that as it was not set forth in their agreement, the 
wearing of this lurid scarf constituted a distinct breach of 
their partnership contract. 

"Donate it to the Red Cross," suggested Al. Gerberd- 
ing, pertinently. 

" But you fellows are behind the times," protested the 
aggrieved Moseley. "I tell you it's the most fashion- 
able " 

"They buncoed you, Moseley," said Dick Mulcahy, 
sympathetically. 

And so they intend to auction off the brilliant tie for the 
benefit of the scarlet cross. Eddie Eyre claims to have 
the first call, in view of the necessity of completing his al- 
ready extensive private collection. 

"Quarter bid." 

* * * 

When Pat Cadogan, the well-known stock-broker, re- 
visited his native home in Ireland after an absence of many 
years, one of his first inquiries was regarding the friends 
and companions of his youth. 

"Where's Tim Kelly ?" he asked. 

"Gone," replied the person interrogated, with a sor- 
rowful shake of his head. "Scotch whiskey," he added 
by way of explanation. 

" And Jimmie Murphy ? " continued Cadogan. 

"Scotch whiskey," repeated the man sadly, with an- 
other shake. 

"And how is Dick Kelly ? " asked Pat. 

This time his informant merely shook his head in silent 
grief, but made no remark. 

" Scotch whiskey be d — d," roared the Cadogan, in a 
fine frenzy. " What do they expect, mixing nationalities ? 
Why the h — 1 don't the blame fools drink Irish ? " 



The newest toy acquired by Willie Hearst for the little 
boys of his staff to amuse themselves with, is a hoarse, 
screaming and vile-sounding siren, which has been placed 
on the roof of the new Examiner building. In their haste 
and anxiety to play with it, the cheerful infants of the 
editorial staff made a fine display of deep feeling and 
afforded a magnificent object lesson in the eternal fitness 
of observing the proprieties last Saturday evening. 

Just as the man working at the white sheet had finished 
painting the bulletin, "Bismarck is dead," the siren gave 
a long blast of hysterical joy as if gleefully celebrating the 
addition of a new subscriber. 

"Typical of the Examiner's refinement (sic)," was the 
general comment of the crowd on the cobble stones below. 



The usual midsummer low jinks this year were presided 
over by Harry Diamond, who made a capital presiding 
officer. Many of the characters taken by the Bohemians 
were very amusing. Among others were Dan McLaugh- 
lin as an Irishman, Porter Ashe in a take-off on Winthrop, 
the fat Englishman at the Palace Hotel, Walter Crowell 
in his coon song, Martinetti in a ballet act. They were all 
most cleverly done; but the funniest numbers on that rich 
and racy programme were those of Jack Wilson as "Hot 
Stuff," and Dick Hotaling as Ophelia. They were im- 
mense, and provoked the wildest enthusiasm. "Hot 
Stuff" and Ophelia have been current coin ever since 
among the Bohemians. 



An excelleDt remedy for insomnia will be found in the famous old Jesse 
Moore Whlskej taken at bed-time. Your druggist has it for sale. 



Sober up on Jackson's Napa Soda. 



August 6. 1898. 



SAN l-RANC \i \\ s II TTI-R. 



Two (hrls and four gay brokers comprised tin 
party One of the youn»f women is the hai 
daughter of a 0iti7.cn not unknown in Washington, ami tin 
is a popular society girl. 

Do KO mplish the distraction of the haml- 
lri.-hman who was the center of attraction in this, 
every party, the girls had created a little fad of their own. 
Each wore a garter of tiny, tinkling, silver bolls. With 
every gesture of the lithe youDg queens, the 1 
sounded the delicate and dainty music of those charming 
bells. And at every sound the girls glanced coquet 
at the stalwart Irishman. But he was discreet and fore- 
bore inquiry, although curiosity was really devouring his 
soul. At last he could stand it no longer. 

'"Strange this rivalry, isn't it?" he remarked, ingenu- 
ously. "First, the Call gets a cannon, then the Examiner 
procures a siren and now the Chronicle springs a chirm of 
bells on us!" 

Tinkling sounds distract no more, for the stockings of 
each of those young women are now held in position by a 
narrow band which is severely and strictly orthodox. 

* * * 

Major McLaughlin has a firm belief in himself aud also 
in his massive form and stupendous will. The other night 
under the gentle guidance of Paul Maroney, the Major 
was inducted into a "mystery parlor" presided over by a 
gentleman who can raise quarters out of glasses, draw 
flushes from packs of cards and other highly mysterious 
things connected with the Black Art. The Major is a bit 
of a hypnotist himself. He can make people, even 
politicians, do what he likes, and he boasts of his sleight of 
hand tricks. The professor of the Black Art looked long 
and fixedly at the Major and said he could hypnotize him. 
The request for a trial was promptly accepted and though 
the Major had passes made down his back he stood as 
firm as a rock. There is no hypnotizing the Major — none 
at all — but the way he threw his twenties around treating 
the credulous hypnotized more than one man. There is 
nothing like a twenty dollar gold piece as a hypnotic 
agent. 

* * * 

A worthy clergyman, whose brain is a trifle sluggish, 
although his own admiration for his sonorous if not always 
thoughtful eloquence is illimitable, voiced a curious peti- 
tion to the Almighty in the course of an ex tempore prayer 
on Sunday evening. He noticed a number of uniformed 
soldiers scattered throughout bis congregation, and he 
felt he must take some notice of their presence, especially 
in view of the peace negotiations. 

The thick-headed parson has conscientiously, consistently 
and continuously opposed the war, and he flattered him- 
self that he was achieving a master stroke all around 
when he loudly, tersely but ambiguously prayed that "the 
courage of the combative might be cooled by turning all 
the warlike into the Pacific." 

* * * 

After a successful day in the wheat pit, Harry Wise was 
sauntering complacently along Montgomery street, when 
his range of vision encountered a particularly violent dis- 
play of hosiery in a haberdasher's window. He entered 
the shop and priced the lurid designs in Scotch plaids. 

"Three dollars a pair," was the ipse dixit of the clerk at 
the bargain counter. 

" I'll take a dozen," said Harry, easily. "And say," he 
added to the now obsequious and humble salesman, "I'll 
take a dozen more for my pony." 

"Your what?" gasped the clerk. 

" Yes, my horse. Those colors will make him run if 
anything will!" 

A great many of the officers, both regulars and navy volunteers, 
have had their uniforms made in this city by J. M. Litchfield & Co., 
at 12 Post street. The garments made by these fine tailors al- 
ways fit splendidlv, are made of the best materials and give an 
officer a distinguished military and at the same time dressy appear- 
a ce. 



Ntw line of picture frames, in metal, gold, and old oak, green 
vory, and Japanese gray ; also elegant line of picture mouldings. 
Jobu F. Kennedy, Art Dealer, 19 and 21 Post street. 



Moore's Poison Oak Remedy. 
Cures poison oak and all skin diseases. Sold by all druggists. 




Evans' Ale 

stands tot nil that is perfection m bren log and bottling 

present*] the new era in the ale-brewing Indus 

try. Full round finished taste, sparkling brilliancy, 

i-n-jitiy bead, :»ud 1 lie fragrance of 11 tieltl uf rlpo hops 

are :ui together id every bol tie. 

SHERWOOD Sc SHERWOOD, 
Pacific 1 Joasi Agents, 

Portland. San Francisco. Los Angeles. 



THE WELLESLEY, 



— 1433 California Street. 



The Most Attractive Family Hotel in San Francisco. 
Entirely New in Every Feature. 



HOTEL 
BELLA VISTA 

A First-class Hotel 
1001 Pine street 



Mrs. Merry. Proprietor. 

The Bella Vista is the Pioneer 
First-class Family Hotel of 
San Francisco. All the com- 
forts ol a modern residence. 

MRS. A. P. TRACY 



New York. 



Under new management. Rooms single or 
en suite. Restaurant unsurpassed. Ele 
gant in all appointments at moderate 
prices. 

Reed & Roblee Proos. 
EUROPEAN PLAN. 



Madison Square, Broadway and 23d 
Street. 

HOTEL 
BARTHOLDI 

New York 



OCCIDENTAL HOTEL 



A quiet home, centrally located, for 
those who appreciate comfort and 

attention. 



Wm. B. Hooper, Manager. 



San Francisco 



RIGGS HOUSE 



WASHINGTON, D. C 



THE HOTEL PAR EXCELLENCE" 

of the National Capital, First class In all 

appointments. 

An Illustrated guide to Washington will he 

mailed free of charge, upon receipt of two 

2-cem stamps. 

0. G. STAPLES, Prop. 



GRAY BROS., 



316 Montgomery St., S. P. 

205 New High St., Los Angeles. 



fi oncrete and . . . 
Artificial Stone Work. 



Laurel Hill Cemetery 

ASSOG I ATION. Sells burial lots and 
graves. Perpetual care. 
Junction ot Bush St. and Central Ave.. S. F. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 6, 1898. 



A Bnde of Japanese ground, the South Sea Islands, the 
Japan. land of the Lotus-eaters, have been so 
thoroughly gone over; Tennyson and Sir 
Edwin Arnold, Louis Becke, Lafcadio Heme and Pierre 
Loti have given us so much that is worth remembering in 
this direction, that it is only occasionally that a novel 
phasis of life across the Pacific attracts our attention. 
We have learned to think that taking a wife in Japan is 
not a very serious matter. The farewell to Madame 
Chrysanthcme, the prayer which follows it: "O Ama— 
Terace — Orai — Kami, wash me quite clean of this little 
marriage in the waters of the river Kamo" may even 
strike one as the most natural ending possible to 
la vie & deux so common to foreigners living in the Orient. 
Carlton Dawe's story is that of an Englishman, "no saint 
but a sinner with limitations," who having his own ideas 
of honor, of the sanctity of marriage, of the fitness of 
things resolves to do what he thinks is right, and makes 
in so doing a signal failure of life. Henry Tresilian, for 
that is his name, first sees Sasa-San, the daughter of a mar- 
ket gardener, beneath the slopes of Fuji- Yama wrapped in 
the sunshine and fanned by the fragrance of the plum 
blossoms, a quaint little figure — barely seventeen. She 
first amuses, then interests him and ere long a sudden 
passion for the little native girl springs up in his heart. 
The pure associations of his old Cornish home, the moral 
precepts which he had learned as a boy still linger with 
him, and after a vain attempt to forget her he decides to 
marry her. This moment of quixotic chivalry he soon re- 
grets and realizes that "he is of the white race, she of 
the yellow and God had set each within his sphere." 
Their utter incompatability brings to them abject misery 
and complete degradation. He is shunned by his friends, 
and in the advent of his child can see nothing but shame 
and humiliation. Sasa-San, unloved and forlorn, frequents 
a tea house of indifferent fame and finally disappears — 
and the child dies after having been taken to his father's 
heart. Sasa-San, desperately ill, at last returns to the 
home she deserted, and Tresilian, still true to the task he 
has set himself, finds a dozen reasonable excuses for her 
shortcomings, and when the mists creep into her almond- 
shaped eyes, it is his hand that she faintly feels clasped in 
hers, it is his voice that she dimly hears murmuring her 
old name "Plum-Blossom." The story is unpleasant in 
the extreme, so full of pathos, so full of heart-woe. One 
might be tempted to ask if the Chrysanthcme menage, if 
less in accordance with our ideas of morality, was not after 
all more satisfactory to those concerned. There may be 
points of view in morality as in other things possibly, and 
much depends upon the way one looks at a thing. 

A Bride of Japan, by Carlton Dawe. Herbert S. Stone & Co , Chicago and 
New York. For sale by Doxey. 



The Celebrity. The phenomenal success of this very 
clever book, from the pen of Mr. Win- 
ston Churchill, has been attributed by not a few to the 
fact that the author is presumed to have satirized in 
the hero a well-known magazine writer. The author 
distinctly denies any such purpose, and emphasizes the 
fait that the character of the Celebrity, as he has drawn 
it, is an essential make-up of the little comedy, and on it 
the plot hinges, and adds that he has written it merely as 
a bit of fun. This bit of fun is already in its fifth edi- 
tion, and no extraneous aid whatsoever is needed to 
make the book popular in the extreme, for it cannot fail 
to interest and amuse a wide circle of readers. Mr. 
Churchill wields his pen with dexterity and unusual clever- 
ness. Satirical, cynical he is, but in the airiest, .nost 
delicate way, with never a bitter nor a dull word to mar 
a most delightful and entertaining ensemble. The story 
is clean, wholesome, bubbling over with wit and humor, 
and from cover to cover is a succession of enjoyments. 
Better reading of its kind it would be hard to find. The 
story is this : The Celebrity, whose real cognomen, by the 



way, is never revealed, writes a book or two, springs sud- 
denly into fame, and finds himself the hero of the hour, 
flattered and sought after wherever he goes. After an- 
nouncing his determination to make a European trip in 
search of "color" for his next novel, he in reality goes 
West, for reasons of his own, to a quiet summer resort on 
one of the great lakes. In order to enjoy himself incog- 
nito, he assumes during his stay at Asquith the name of a 
man whom he closely resembles, Charles Wrexell Allen. 
He soon becomes a social success, leads the cotillions, 
drives a brake with skill, plays golf, and is made much of. 
The man whose name he has taken is agent for the Miles 
Standish Bicycle Company. By absconding with a hundred 
thousand dollars, he causes the quasi Charles Wrexell 
Allen to go through a series of adventures, and to experi- 
ence various hairbreadth escapes. The arrival of the de- 
tective who comes in search of the defaulter, the well- 
meant endeavors of his friends to save the Celebrity from 
the strong arm of the law, the little revenges of a girl he 
has jilted and a man who has no reason to like him, and 
his vain attempt to prove his identity, cause him finally 
to seek refuge across the line in Canada, and from Victoria 
he sails for Japan. Meanwhile, the li<>na fide Mr. Allen, 
concluding probably that it is a poor rule that will not work 
both ways, assumes in turn the Celebrity's name, crosses 
the Atlantic, and during a meteoric trip through England, 
the alleged author is wined and dined and lionized gen- 
erally. "The thing was most decidedly convenient; it was 
the hand of Providence," the absconder remarks, when 
some months later, in the lobby of a hotel in Algiers, he 
comes face to face with the Celebrity. This brief synop- 
sis can give but the faintest idea of the comic situations 
and clever style of the book. It must be read to be appre- 
ciated. 

The Celebrity: An Episode. By Winston Churchill. The Maeuilllan Co., 
fill Fifth avenue. Price, }1.60, 



Prose and Poetry Admirers of the author of Leaves of 
of Wait Whitman. Grass cannot fail to be interested in 
the new edition of Walt Whitman's 
works, which contains an introduction by Professor Triggs 
of the University of Chicago by whom it is edited. There 
are selections both from the Poems and Prose Works, as 
well as one or two letters of the Poet. Mr. Triggs calls 
Whitman the genius of American Nationality and says 
"He connects the two great eras of American History,— 
the era of independence centering in the Revolutionary 
War, and the era of social union that concentrated in the 
Civil War; and he connects them with a completeness and 
integrity that can be presumed of no other American 
author." The book contains also the preface to the first 
edition of Leaves of Grass, to which the editor calls atten- 
tion and declares to be a remarkable essay. He also says 
"The record of outward events does not constitute the bio- 
graphy of such a man as Whitman. He was a seer. His 
life was wrought in harmony with the higher spiritual 
laws of his being. What he contributed to the world was 
not a series of incidents, but a new spiritual experience. 
By virtue of that experience his greatness is recognized, 
and his power acknowledged. He is to-day the minister 
of a religion whose service is admitted by palpable live 
disciples. Not to perceive the sacer nif<x aspect of his life 
is to miss the reason for his extraordinary influence and 
to remain ignorant of the essential fact of his biography.' 
Whitman had the rare faculty of drawing all men to him. 
and Dr. Bucke, in his funeral address said of him: "Whit- 
man had in an eminent degree that crowning endowment, 
quality or whatever it may be called, the possession of 
whichcauses a man to be picked out from the rest and 
set apart as an object of affection." It is a very apprecia- 
tive synopsis of the Poet's life and his life work that Mr. 
Triggs gives us and a careful perusal of the book will con- 
vince the reader that the aim of the editor to put before 
us not what from a conventional point of view would be 
called "the best" but rather what is most characteristic 
of Whitman has been attained. 

Selections from the Prose and Poetry of Walt Whitman. Edited with an 
introduction by Osoar Lovell Triggs, Ph. u. For sale hy Elder and 
She 11 St. PrlceM.80. 



MoTHBBs.be sure and use " Mrs. Wlnslow's Soothing Syrup " for your 

ontldren while teething. 

For a cool head— drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



August 6, 1898. 



SAX I K \\\ \! \VS LETTER. 



LOVE AND MARRIAGE. 



THE handle turned, and as the door slowly opened a 
man who had been sitting by the tire rose to I 
It wa> not the woman he had expected, but, oddly enough, 
the very individual on whose personality his mind liail 
been dwelling. 

" 1 was thinking of you." was his opening remark, as he 
bent to kiss her hand. The hand was withdrawn. Under 
the circumstances the action was not surprising. It 
motioned him to a seat. He sat down, negligently 
ing his left with his right leg. 

"Thinking of me — and expecting my sister." she replied, 
archly. 

"The very essence of combination," he rejoined, politely. 
"So you are going to be married?" 
she started abruptly. 

"At last," he replied, incautiously. 
She raised her eyebrows and laughed. 
"The experiment might have been 
tested before, had you elected." The 
inference in her speech made her color. 
"The natural attitude of a woman is 
unconscious exaggeration." He at- 
tempted an evasion. 

" You know I have not exaggerated," 
said she, quite firmly. 

" If it were possible, I wish you had." 
His voice was low. 

"Who is to blame?" She turned 
away. It was almost a whisper. 

"God knows I thought you had 
married." 

"There was no occasion to think. If 
God knew, St. James' would have 
knowo." 

" It was reported in St. James' you 
had married abroad." 

' 'You believed?" she asked, scornfully. 
The man bowed in assent. 
"How conceited some men are!" the 
woman exclaimed. 

"That is wofully true, dear lady," 
said he, quite pleasantly. 

" Was it from pique or love?" de 
manded she, quickly. 
I sincerely hoped it was not from love," observed the 
man. 

She made a gesture of intense resentment. "How can 
you say such things to me?" 

" To whom else should I say them?" The turn of affairs 
was becoming complex. 

" You are to marry my sister?''' 
" That is also quite true." 

"You jilted me " 

"Which is not true at all."- 
" You know that you did." 
" You should know that I did not." 

She turned her back to look out of the window. Her 
toe tapped petulantly on the carpet. 

"Circumstances over which " 

" It is an error of taste to quibble," said she. 

It was certainly no quibble, but he ceased to explain. 

" The whole,season you acted as my devoted slave " 

" To be your slave for a season is to be your slave for a 
lifetime," interrupted the man. 

"You evidently possess many lives," she retorted, 
tartly. 

"If I did I would lay them at your feet," was his earnest 
response. 

" Where so many others have trodden I really should 
decline." She spoke disdainfully. "If I loved you then— 
which I certainly did not — your conduct — I can not speak 
of it. I went abroad, and on my return, it is my sister. 
You are bent on keeping in the family, but the family may 
not want you." 

"To shut my eyes with your sister— only I prefer to 
keep them open — is to recall your voice, its very timbre, 
its every inflection. Once, when her arms were round my 
neck, it'was you I saw, your face was there, your eyes 




-might mine ob, Godl Now, do you understand I love 
9tll. 

'It is not fair to my sister." 

" Is it fair to any of us ? " asked the man. 

" Your marriage to my sister " began the woman. 
lid it not be her sister ? " suggested the man. 

" Whom you jilted," sharply said the woman by way of 
parenthes. 

" Forgive me." pleaded the man. 

" Don't ! Have you no tact at all? " 
It would seem 1 had very little." 

She smiled sadly. "Did you really think I was married?" 
ntly inquired the woman. 

" The story was generally accepted." 

" What of this?" flashed out the woman. Her eyes were 
bright; her lips drawn tightly together. She held between 
the lingers of her hand a scarf-pin. The design was sim- 
ple. A small diamond glistened from the center of a coil 
of golden rope. It could have been symbolical of a great 
love based on a greater hope. Through a momentary 
transition it became a satire, drenched with tears. 

" Let it be paramount," begged the man. 

" Paramount ! You forget who I am," cried the woman. 

" For me — the beauty of the world," remarked the man 
gently. 

" Your visit to-day " she toyed with the pin. 

" I am thinking of two years ago." His voice was hard. 

"What a cad you are," she said, replacing the pin in 
her dress. 

" I beg your pardon," said the man, humbly. 

She looked at him, and her eyes were tender as they 
lingered on the face of the man. She held the pin in her 
fingers again. 

" This bond " commenced she, looking at the pin. 

"Can there be a bond between us? " asked the man, 
eagerly. 

" You make me weak. It is not possible. Yet I love 
you. Why were you not true, too ? " Her eyes glistened. 

" But I was. I am. This marriage is no criterion," 
exclaimed the man. 

" Matrimony is customarily accepted as a criterion," 
said the woman, quietly. 

" It is nothing." The man rose to his feet. 

" The idiosyncrasies of nothing can be tangible enough. 

" What a tragedy my life will be!" declared the man, 
bitterly. 

" By looking into the future you omit my past," the girl 
rejoined. 

"I believe some lives re-enact the deeds of the past in 
the actions of the future." 

"What an awful comfort. It will blight your happiness." 

" My happiness ! My happiness " and he paused. 

The rustle of a gown could be heard on the staircase. It 
stopped at the door. 

"Here comes my happiness," said he cynically. 

"Be courageous," said the woman, as her sister en- 
tered. 

" There goes my happiness," said he to himself, as the 
former woman left the room. At the door she turned; 
their eyes met. The lips of the man met the lips of the 
woman in his arms, but his heart had already met the 
heart of the woman by the door. — St. Paul's. 

You will get a new notion 

of what a lamp-chimney can 
be, when you use a Macbeth ; 
and of what it can do, when 
you get the right one. 
Get the Index. 

Write Macbeth Pittsburgh Pa 



Bon Marctie 
Clothing Renovatory 

20 Ellis Street, room 1-2. 



SUITS CLEANED 
AND PRESSED 



$1.00 



L. B. NORDLUND 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 6, 1898. 




f mL 




More About the 
Garden Valley Mine. 

the Chester buyers. 



Continuing his statement about the 
methods of the promoters of this 
mine, the Superintendent, Mr. Ash- 
ton, says in a recent letter that 
after considering Mr. Lonergan s re- 
port, employed an English mining engineer, Mr. Mathew 
Francis, a man of unquestionable reputation, to examine 
and report on the property. Mr. Francis was accom- 
panied on his visit by a gentleman named John Lightfoot, 
who, apparently, was interested in eliciting the real value 
of the property, and who it was, therefore, supposed would 
prove valuable in watching the movements of those whom 
later developments conclusively proved were nothing more 
or less than sharpers. At the mine Francis met Judge 
Morrison, Messrs. Lonergan. N. D. Burlingham and son, 
W. McEwen, and a few others. While Mr. Francis went 
into the mine, Lightfoot was detailed to stay on the sur- 
face to receive the samples as they were hoisted. The 
gear at that time was not adapted for men, so that Mr. 
Francis could not ride up with the samples. "I have it 
on reliable authority," says Mr. Ashton, ''that Mr. 
Lightfoot appeared quite indifferent as to what was going 
on about him. Did he succumb to the wily overtures of 
the sharpers and join in the plunder, or was he in tbe ring 
at the outset ? Recent developments show that the latter 
was the case. The samples in question were assayed, 
and gave an average value of $5.48 per ton, while Loner- 
gan put the average at $fi.37. As a matter of fact Lon- 
ergan's average was virtually based on fictitious assays 
and mill tests, and Mr. Francis' samples were "salted." 
The disparity in the results — natural enough, and to be 
expected even between experts who are equally capable 
and trustworthy — showed how skilfull was the manipula- 
tion in this case." Some time afterwards, referring to his 
presence at the mine when Mr. Francis inspected the 
same, Mr. Lonergan in one of his letters says: "I owed it 
to myself to see that everything went all right." "In 
this," says Ashton, "he was true. He did see that things 
went right — for his employers. Moreover, it is now ob- 
vious to us that Lonergan labored desperately to secure 
for himself the position of general manager and that of 
superintendent for N. D. Burlingham. Had he succeeded 
in this particular, unquestionably a part of the fraudulent 
scheme — and the fact that it failed does not detract one 
particle from its infamous nature — it would have been a 
complete success, and probably unparalleled in mining 
history. The price paid for the mine was inadequate to 
meet the demands of all the miserable, needy wretches 
concerned, hence the necessity of securing control of the 
company's funds, the result of which can be imagined bet- 
ter than described. When I commenced to report unfav- 
orable results to the company, Lonergan was requested 
to visit the mine and explain matters. This he did, and, 
among other things of minor importance, he reported to 
the company that the precious metal escaped in the tail- 
ings, a statement which to my knowledge he has not yet 
attempted to substantiate." Mr. Ashton then asks why 
Lonergan doesn't stick to his guns and fight it out. 



The following letter has just been received by Mr. Ash- 
ton from Smith & Irving, assayers of Los Angeles, tbe 
contents of which are all the more strange when it is re- 
membered that prominent men of that city endorsed the 
character of the individual in question: 

Dear Sir:— Referring to your letter in the San Fran- 
cisco NEWS Letter of July 9th, regarding J. J. Lonergan. 

Mr. Lonergan entered into business with me on March 
, r >tb, 1895, previous to which he was a partner in the N. Y. 
Kitchen (a restaurant); he had at that time no knowledge 
of the assaying or refining business, and stated to me he 
had never seen a mine. During the latter part of our 
first year of partnership, about January or Februarv. '96 
he informed me that Judge Morrison had a bond on the 
Esperanza mine and requested that I go and expert it on 
a contingent fee. This I refused to do, and soon after he 
requested leave of absence to go to Santa Barbara on a 



vacation, which I of course acquiesced in. A week or so 
later I received a letter from him dated Garden Valley, El 
Dorado Co., stating that Judge Morrison had prevailed 
upon him to go and expert the Esperanza mine, and that 
there was a contingent fee in it, and if it was sold I was to 
have one-half of the commission During the last three 
months of the year I was engaged in business with him I 
was away most of the time experting the Good Hope 
mice in Riverside Co., this State. During that time I 
turned in to the firm nearly $3,000 from my earnings, and 
the firm was at the same time doing a business that would 
net at least $500 a month. When I returned I found the 
firm bankrupt, when it should have shown a profit of at 
least $3,000 or $4,000, Mr. Lonergan stating that be had 
lost money in buying gold. I had in the meantime become 
suspicious of his honesty, and sent in by other parties dur- 
ing my absence several assays which I bad paid for, but 
which were left under other names than my own, and on 
my return none of these assays showed on either the assay 
or cash books when they should have shown on both. I 
stated this circumstance to Mr. Lonergan and told him he 
had better, for his own benefit, sit down and think of the 
assays he had been paid for and charge them to himself, 
so it would not be a State Prison offense. He sat down 
and made an entry in the petty cash book as follows: 
"Assays during November, December and January, by 
mistake not entered," making several entries amounting to 
s."i3 .37, which he charged to himself. On the next day I 
informed him I no longer wanted him as a partner, and he 
must retire from the firm or I would sue for a dissolution 
of partnership and an accounting. He retired within the 
given time. I have received a letter from Mr. H. L. 
Magee, General Superintendent of the Wabash System, on 
his official letter-head, stating that Mr. Lonergan (who 
was at one time a conductor on that road) was discharged 
for dishonesty, and had been excommunicated from the 
Masonic Lodge, and that he did not consider Mr. Loner- 
gan had one spark of manhood in him. I have the books 
with Mr. Lonergan's entries and Mr. Magee's letter, and 
if they would do you any good could send them to you. 

(Signed) Wm. T. Smith. 
The disgraceful exposure following the 
Ermine Trailed Hooley bankruptcy in London, showing 
in the Gutter. the corrupt conduct of men of high 
standing in social life only confi rms the be- 
lief all along maintained by the public in the bad reputation 
of the average guinea pig. When a trade peer is accused 
of rascality of the kind it does not occasion much surprise, 
but some of tbe names now mentioned were certainly above 
suspicion. In many cases, however, it is the inevitable 
result, working out centuries later in the descendants of 
the venal scum pitchforked into the House of Lords by his 
"Sowship" James the First and others of his ilk. No 
wonder need now be expressed at the way people have 
been plundered in the flotation of California mines abroad 
by common people, when an Earl of Warwick is branded 
the world over as a swindler. He and a few more of his 
titled associates should be pitchforked out of the Lords 
into Portland or some other of the English penitentiaries. 

The craze for promotion, "family 
Th» Latest Fad in charges and for other reasons," has 
Company Promotion, necessitated the flotation 1 f a com- 
pany in London to dispose of the 
old Lancashire estate of Clitheroe, belonging to the Buc- 
cleuch and Queensberry family, comprising tbe Honor of 
Clitheroe, tbe castle of Clitheroe, ai.d subordinate manors. 
The share capital is £300,000. Some of our millionaires 
have in this an opportunity to purchase a valuable prop- 
erty, with no end of intensely interesting historical remin- 
iscences, and a few genuine family ghosts thrown in. 

The stock market took on a much 
Business Better on better tone this week, and prices 
Pine Street. have been firm in the leadiug shares, 

which have been dealt in more liber- 
ally. There are good prospects in many of the mines, and 
one or more of them chancing to fill at any moment would 
liven up matters considerably. The fact that stocks are 
scarce among the pjblic is established clearly enough by 
tbe action of the market. In local stocks the tip is out on 
Hawaiian, and stock has been bought largely by outside 
dealers for some days past. 



Aligns! f- i8q* 



san ! R \i \\s LETTER. 



'3 




' Uearthe Crier:" "Wn»t -neUeTllarllhour 
Oncihsi will Dl«Tihede<-n.alr.witb job." 



ftTTE^'TIO^" has been called in these columns to the 
f.ict that druggists without right or title proscribe 
medicine and treat patients as if they were regularly 
graduated doctors. of course, people* 3 re to blame for 
going to the druggist, but some assert that many a drug- 
gist knows more than many a doctor, whicl. is undoubtedly 
true, judging from some specimens of doctors. Sergeant 
Jesse Cook then did right when he had the druggist C. D. 
Hakes sent to the City Hall to explain how the man be 
had been treating came near unto death's door, and had it 
not been f>r prompt assistance his patient may possibly 
have died. This application of the law put the fear of a 
terrible and avenging destiny into the would-be doctor. 
Our whole system of medicine is rotten ! We turn out 
doctors and druggists by wholesale; and some of these 
doctors! One instance will suffice. In a hospital attached 
to the city a doctor on his watch made an examination of 
a case. He pronounced the case not serious— merely con- 
tusions. The patient groaned and groaned, and another 
doctor, when coming on his watch, found a broken shoul- 
der and dressed it. Number One declared the conduct 
unprofessional, and said it was done so as to deprive him 
of the chances of making money. So the person was to 
suffer excruciating pain, and when unable to stand it 
would "dig up " and employ a physician. The preliminary 
examination had been made— the rest would have to be 
paid for. And this is a member of the healing art 1 

ONE can never tell what the female mind is after, nor 
can one ever tell before what new hero made of brass 
with clay feet she will next prostrate her adoring body. 
It was Dewey — Dewey from early morn until late at night. 
Pictures of the sea dog were in demand, and each man on 
that immortal fleet was a hero, which is all right enough. 
But where is Dewey now? Fallen is Dewey, and before 
him has arisen a great god — a mere singer it is true — 
de Vries his name. His picture adorned with horns, or 
without horns; even if he has a cloven foot, a cast of it is 
anxiously asked for. What a contrast — Dewey and de 
Vries — both popular. But de Vries is in the lead; for 
while the women sit around as in a Greek chorus and pipe 
his praises in ecstatic fashion, San Francisco's only esthete, 
poet, publisher, faultless dresser, preparer of salads, sits 
on a stool, and with one finger goes through the whole 
opera of Aida I 

THE latest feminine fad is to have a 
figure like a satsuma vase, and to 
this end the hips are to bulge out like a 
bounding billow, and the dress about the 
knees has to come down like a letter V, 
while at the feet the skirts are to be 
drawn almost tight. As yet our fashion- 
able ladies have not made their appear- 
ance in the street in this costume, but 
there is a stealthy practice going on at 
the club which has its rendezvous on 
Pacific avenue. The effect is almost 
startling; and, as there is considerable 
practice necessary for the proper man- 
agement of the arrangement about the 
hips, and a peculiar walk has to be 
adopted, thesecret of whichis only known 
to Count de Pare, that gentleman is at 
present much in demand. 

ftCALIFORNIAN girl will be the wife of the first Gov- 
ernor of the Hawaiian Islands, and that is as it should 
be, for Mrs. Sewall was a Miss Ashe. It looks as if that 
is the only recognition that California will ever get. Now, 
as a customs official has already been appointed to Manila, 
which is as yet unconquered, why is it that for the port of 
Honolulu the Surveyor has not been appointed? Down 
there the name of Chauncey M. St. John has already been 
meutioned. Will this ever come to pass? 



LIKI'TENANT John Jupiter Tonana Bonnet mark 
well the spelling with one t baa eodeared himself to 

body in California by bis aimablc manner! and unfail- 
ing courtesy, Lieutenant John Jupiter Tonans Uennet, 

•no t ODly, is Acting Adjutant General to U 
Qvneral Merriam and is about :is disagreeable :i sprig of 
military misfortune as ever lumbered thef.< arth. 

He wears empyrean curls, little spit curls the vulgar call 
them, which are plastered about his forehead very much 
like the nice little curls that decorate the nice little fore- 
heads of nice little girls who walk by gaslight. Somebody, 
-nine rare genius, told John Bennet, Acting Adjutant 
General to Major General Merriam, that he had the 
Front of Jove, and he straightway shaved off his mustache. 
Poor Bennet, poor fellow. He cannot help knowing that 
he is disliked. That the full fledged private wishes to 
lunge his bayonet through him, that the citizen who has to 
do business with him wishes to punch his head. One in- 
stance of the amiable way in which this fellow, Bennet, of 
the one t, treats people will suffice: A newspaperman 
went to him and politely asked if he could not go aboard 
the McDowell. "I guess not," growled the lieutenant. 
"The last reporter that went on was kicked off." Lieu- 
tenant Bennet prevaricated. The whole trouble is that 
the press has treated the entire army encamped here too 
leniently. Outrages have been hushed up or if mentioned 
at all, in so casual a way, that the grivity of the offense 
has been almost overlooked. Lieutenant Bennet as well 
as others have been treated far too well. There is no ex- 
cuse for rudeness and from every hand loud complaints 
have been made against this soured, disappointed lieuten- 
ant who through his own surly disposition has been given 
"the overlook." 




JJl R. Frederick Healey, who went as a private to Manila, 
1 i. has been indulging in correspondence wherein he 
plainly incites men to mutiny. Mr. Healey is fortunate in 
being a volunteer in the United States army. Heaven 
help him if he were in any other. What strikes anybody 
who thinks at all is the funny way in which this man prates 
of his patriotism and then grumbles at the work to which 
he is put, grumbles at the food, grumbles at everything; 
and plainly accuses the commander of this expedition wi'h 
ignorance and the doctors of the regiment with careless- 
ness — all of which appears in a daily paper with Fred 
Heale3''s name attached. It is rather a strange coin- 
cidence, that young Fred seems anxious to follow in the 
footsteps of those who so hurt his father. It was through 
accusations of subordinates, common sailors, the refuse of 
the earth that charges were first made against his father 
and through whom Captain Healey suffered. Perhaps 
Mr. Healey thinks he will break General Merritt by his 
old womanly and grumbling correspondence. He may, 
however, have to break stones as a reward for his literary 
enterprise. In another army he might be shot. 

WHO can dare deny that the New York regiment is a 
swell organization. Why, its Colonel is an eight-time 
millionaire, and each man in this organization has an opin- 
ion that be is a better soldier, a better citizen, than the 
ordinary creature born in the rest of the United States. 
The men are not to be put in the face of danger. They 
are to be sent to Honolulu, where their Colonel, with his 
millions, is to make a grand social splurge. The Colonel 
would not travel on the transports which the authorities 
are to furnish, but be went on the St. Paul because it was 
more commodious. The excuse that he went to prepare 
mansions for his men is rather too thin to be believed. 
Colonel Barber went because be wished to avoid any dis- 
comfort that might be entailed in a small vessel. 

WHILE there is so much hip-hip-hurrah about the for- 
eign expansion of the United States, and reports are 
steadily circulated as to the desire of these people to come 
under our flag, it may be as well to examine into this over- 
whelming wish to become citizens of this country. Now 
there is a very strong feeling in the Hawaiian Islands 
against annexation, and this sentiment is not solely con- 
fined to the natives of the island. Eminent travelers like 
Mr. John Fogarty, who have spent several months investi- 
gating the moral condition of Honolulu, its fauna and flora, 
its hula-hula and other exotic excrescences, are of the be- 
lief that many of its people are by no means delighted at 
the idea of becoming citizens. 



*4 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 6, 1898. 




EACH IN HIS OWN NAME.— w. h carruth, in leavenworth times- 

A FIRE-MIST and a planet, 
A crystal and a cell, 
A jellyfish and a saurian, 
And caves where the cavemen dwell ; 
Then a sense of law and beauty, 
And a face turned from the clod- 
Some call it Evolution, 
And others call it God, 

A haze on the far horizon, 
The infinite, tender sky ; 
The ripe-rich tints of the cornfields, 
And the wild geese sailing high ; 
And all over upland and lowland 
The charm of the golden rod- 
Some of us call it Autumn, 
And others call it God. 

Like tides on a crescent sea-beach, 
When the moon is new and thin. 
Into our hearts high yearnings 
Come welling and surging in — 
Come from the mystic ocean 
Whose rim no foot has trod— 
Some of us call it Longing, 
And others call it God. 

A picket frozen on duty, 

A mother starved for her brood, 

Socrates drinking the hemlock, 

And Jesus on the rood; 

The millions who, humble and nameless, 

The straight, hard pathway trod— 

Some call it Consecration, 

And others call it God. 



LOVE WAS TRUE TO ME-— unpublished poem by john boyle o'reilly. 

L< »\"C was true to me, 
True and tender, 
I who ought to be 

Love's defender. 
Let the cold winds blow 

Till they chilled him. 
Let the winds and sun 

Shroud him— and I knew 
That I killed him. 

Years he cried to me 

To be kinder. 

I was blind to see, 

And grew blinder. 
Years with soft hands raised, 

Fondly reaching, 
Wept and prayed and praised. 
Still beseeching. 

When he died I woke, 

' rod, how lonely! 
When the gray dawn broke 

On one only, 
Now beside Love's grave 

1 am kneeling 
All he sought and gave, 

I am feeling. 



SONG— bl/ss carmen. 

Lore, by that loosened hair. 

Well now I know 
Where the lost Lillith went 

So long ago 

i/ove, by those starry Bjea 

I understand, 
How the sea maidens lure 

Mortals from land. 

Love, by that welling laugh 
Joy claims his own, 

Sea-born and wind-wayward 
Child of the sun. 



BANKING. 
Bank of British Columbia. { t££&?Sft2fr B gS5S,$& 

Capital Paid Up 13,000,000 Reserve Fund I 500,000 

HEAD OFFICE. 60 Lombard Street, London 

Branches — Victoria, Vancouver, New Westminster, Kamloopa, Nan- 
lamo. Nelson, Sandon, and Kaslo, British Columbia; Portland, Oregon. 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened sub- 
ject to Check, and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted 
available In all parts of the world. Approved Bills discounted and ad- 
vances made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates 
upon Its Head Office and Branches, and upon Its Agents, as follows: 

New York— Merchants' Bank of Canada ; Chicago— First Na tlonal Bank ; 
Liverpool— North and South Wales Bank; Scotland — British Linen 
Company; Ireland— Bank of Ireland; Mexico— London Bank of Mexico; 
South America— London Bank of Mexico and South America; China and 
Japan — Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China; Australia and 
New Zealand — Bank of Australasia and Commercial Banking Company ot 
Sydney, Ld ; Demerara and Trinidad (West Indies)— Colonial Bank. 

Also on Dawson City, Yukon District, arrangements having been made 
with the Canadian Bank of Commerce whereby it Is prepared to Issue 
drafts and Letters of Credit on that Bank at above point, and transact 
other banking business. Terms upon application. 

San Francisco Savings Union. 

532 California Street. 

Deposits, Julyl, 1898 $33,356,130 Reserve Fund $182,001' 

Pald-Up Capital 1,000,000 Contingent Fund .. 435,515 

E. B. PONu, President W. C. B. DeFREMERY, Vice-President 

LOVELL WHITE, Cashier. 

Directors: George W Beaver, Thomas Magee, W. C. B. de Fremery, Al- 
bert Miller, Robert Watt, George C. Boardman, Daniel E. Martin, George 
Tasheira. E. B. Pond. 

Loans upon San Francisco and Oakland Real Estate, and Farms and 
Farming Lands in the Country. 

Receives Deposits. Country remittances may he made In checks payable 
in San Francis -o. Post Office or Wells Fargo & Co. 's Money Orders, or coin 
by Express, but the responsibility of this bank commences only with the 
receipt cl the mooey. 

No charge is made for pass-book or entrance fee. 

Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 3 p. m , and Saturday evenings, for receipt of de- 
posits only. 6:30 to 8 o'clock. 

Bank ot California, San Francisco. 

Capital and Surplus, 16,000,000 

WILLIAM ALVORD President I CHARLES R. BISHOP . . Vice-Pres't 

ALLEN M. CLAY Secretary THOMAS BROWN Cashier 

S.Prentiss Smith... Ass't Cashier 1 1. F. Moulton 2d Ass 't Cashier 

CORRESPONDENTS. 
New York— Messrs. Laldlaw St Co.; the Bank of New York.N.B. A. 
Baltimore- -The National Exchange Bank. Boston— The Tremont Na- 
tional Bank; CHICAGO — Illinois Trust and Savings Bank; Union National 
Bank. Philadelphia— Philadelphia National Bank. St. Louis— Boat- 
man's Bank. Virginia Citt (Nev.)— Agency of The Bank of California. 
London— Messrs. N. M. Rothschild St Sons; Paris— Messrs. de Roths- 
child Freres. Berlin— Direction der Dlsconto Gesellschaft. China, 
Japan and East Indies— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China. 
Australia and New Zealand— The Union Bank of Australia, Ltd., and 
Bank of New Zealand. 
Letters of Credit issued available In all parts of the world. 

The San Francisco National Bank, 

Southeast Corner of Pine and Sansome streets, S. F. 
Jas. K. Wilson, President. E. A. Bruguiere, Vice-President. 

Lewis I. Cowgill, Cashier. F. W. Wolfe, Assistant Cashier. 

Capital 1500,000 

Directors: Jas. K. Wilson. D. J. Staples, Wm. Pierce Johnson, Geo. 
A. Pope. E. A. Bruguiere. Ed. G. Lukens, Charles C. Judson. 

Agents: New York— Hanover National Bank, Chase National Bank; 
Boston— National Bank of the Commonwealth. Philadelphia — Drexel St 
Co. Chicago — Continental National Bank. St. Louis— The Mechanics' 
Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. London— Brown Shipley St 
Co. Paris—Morgan, Harjes & Co. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 

33 Post Street, below Kearny, mechanics' Institute Building. 

Guaranteed Capital •1,000,000 Paid-Up Capital 1300,000 

JAMES D. PHELAN. President. S. G. MURPHY, Vice-President. 
GEO. A. STORY. Cashier JOHN A. HOOPER, Vice-President. 

C. B. HOBSON, Assistant Cashier. 

Directors— James D. Phelan, L. P. Drexler, John A. Hooper, C. G- 
Hooker, James Moffltt, S. G. Murphy, Frank J. Sullivan, Robert McElroy, 
and Joseph D. Grant. 

Interest paid on Deposits. Loans on approved securities. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order, Wells, Fargo St Co. , or Exchange 
on City Banks. When opening accounts send signatui e . 

Swiss American Bank ot locarno. Switzerland, and 
Germania Trust Go. of San Francisco t? re "?s g °F mer? 

Paid-up Capital and Reserves, 1620,000. 
(G. T. Co. $320,000) (S. A. B. $300,000) 
A general savings and commercial banking business transacted. Inter- 
est paid on savings deposits. Loans on approved real estate security, and 
on commercial paper. 

DIRECTORS— Ernst A. Denlcke, A. Sbarboro. J. C. Rued, E. Martlnonl, 
F. C. Slebe, A. ToRoazzini, H Brunner, McD. R. Venable, A. G. Wieland, 
F. Kronenberg. Charles Martin, C iehret, P. Tognazzinl, S. Grand!. 

Grocker-Woolworth National Bank of S. F. 

Corker Market, Montgomery, 

aito Post Streets. 

Pald-Up Capital 11,000,000 

WM. H.CROCKER President 

W. E. BROWN Vice-President 

GEO. W. KLINE Cashier 

Directors— Henry T Scott, E. B .Pond, Hy. J.Crocker, Geo. W. Scott 



Aut>u-t 6 



SAX FRAXi \VS LETTER. 



>5 




Wife— By the way. (live, I bad a letter from my banker 
while you were away. He said I had overdrawn my ac- 
count. Husband— Yes, dear, and what did you" do? 
Wife — I told him not to be so rude again, and I sent him 
a check for the amount. — Punch. 

"No, father," the fair girl said, "Mr. Allinpham mav 
not be rich, but his heart is in the right place." "Humph!" 
retorted the crusty old doctor, "you've had your ear 
against it, eh?" — Cleveland Leader. 

She — Why does that piano sound first loud and then soft 
when your sister plays it? Hk— Well, you see, she is 
learning to ride a bike, and uses the pedals alternately 
from force of habit. — Concert-Goer. 

Little Georgie — Do your folks ever have family prayers 
before breakfast. Little Albert — No; we only have 
prayers before we go to bed. We ain't afraid in the day- 
time. — Cleveland Plain Dealer. 

Weary Watkins — With all your gab you got to admit that 
religion has its good points. Hungry Hiooixs — Well, that 
there idea of no work on Sunday is good as far as it goes. 
— Indianapolis Journal. 

Greymair — My wife is such a thoughtful woman. Betteii- 
HAWS — So 's mine. You couldn't imagine all the things 
she thinks about me if I happen to be detained downtown. 
— Cincinnati Enquirer. 

"So you won't enlist if you have a chance? I thought 
you had more patriotism." "Ob, I'm willing to die for my 
country, but I don't want to be hurried about it." — Cin- 
cinnati Enquirer. 

Jenny — Why do you always take that old thing out? It's 
the worst-looking horse in the stable. May — Papa bought 
him very cheap, and I'm fond of driving bargains. — Phila- 
delphia Record. 

On the way home. — Jimmy — Didn't you hear the Sunday- 
school teacher say your conscience is what tells you when 
you do wrong? Tommy — It's a good thing it don't tell your 
mother. — Puck. 

"When I proposed to her she asked me if I was a new 
recruit." "What did she mean 1 " " She wanted to know 
if I had ever participated in an engagement before." — 
Chicago Record. 

"Call a man a sad dog," said the Cornfed Philosopher, 
' and he will look knowing and feel flattered, but if you call 
him a miserable pup he'll wan-t to fight." — Indianapolis 
Journal. 

" Still playing the races?" asked the ignorant person. 
"Naw," answered the bookmaker. "I never did play the 
races. I work them." — Indianapolis Journal. 

Kind Party — If 1 give you this penny, what will you do 
with it ? Tatters (sarcastically) — I'll be honest with you, 
guv'nor. I'll spend it in riotous living. — Tit-Bits. 

Mistress — Bridget, these are ewers. I hope you'll not 
call them jugs any more. Bridget — Thank yez, mum. 
Sure, an' is these cups mine, too?— The Jewelers' Weekly. 

Nell — New woman, is she? Belle — Yes, extreme. She 
told me she was passing the summer in the out-bloomers 
of the city. — Philadelphia Record. 



TRY ALLEN'S FOOT EASE,. 



A Panorama 440 Miles Long 

From the Observation Oar on the New York Central a living pan 
orama 440 miles long may be seen. This includes the Genesse, 
Black River and Mohawk Valleys and 143 miles of the Hudson 
Kiver, including the foothills of the Adirondack Mountains; the 
Oapitoiat Albanv; thp Catskill Mountains; the Palisades of tbe 
Hudson and the New York Central's magnificent approach to the 
metropolis — this being the only trunk line whose traiDr enter the 
citv of New i ork. 

FlNEstaiionery.steelana copper-plate engraving. Cooper 4 Co., 716 
Markets treet, San Francisco. 

When playing poker drink Jackson's Nairn Soda. 



mfon Try ild bj itii 

dniggltt* Trial packuer l"l;l 

- \ Y 



P. A. WILLIAMS 



MINES. 



Room 1207 Claus Spreckels Building 
San Francisco, Cal., U. S. A. 

CAIH.K Asdrbbs 



If vou have any doubt, consult the 

Is Your California Title Insurance and Trust Go. 

Titl6 Insurance policies guaranteeing titles to be 

c perfeot issued and abstraots made and con- 

r6neGfj ? tlnued. Money to loan on real estate. 

Omce-Mills Building. 

Henry L. Davis, President. Ciias. D. Stuart, Secretary. 

BANKING. Z^ZZT 
The Anglo-Galifornian Bank, Limited. 

Capital authorized 16,000,000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 

Paid Up 1,600,000 

Reserve Fund 700,000 

N. E. Cob. Pine add Sansome Sts 
Head Office— 18 Austin Friars , London, E. C 

Agents at New York— J. & W. Seligman & Co., 21 Broad street. 
The Bank transaots a General Banking Business, sells drafts, makes 
telegraphio transfers, and Issues letters of oredit available throughout the 
world. Sends bill* 'or collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange 
and bullion. ION. STEINHART l Mtt __„ ora 
P. N. LILIENTHAL f ManagerB 

The German Savings and Loan Societu. 

No. 526 California Stkeet, San Francisco 
Guarantee capital and surplus. . . .$3,109,000 99 
Capital actually paid up In cash.. 1,000 000 00 

Deposits December 31,1897 26,369,633 36 

OFFICERS: President, B. A. Becker; First Vice-President, Daniel 
Meyer; Second "Vice-President, H. Horstman; Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; 
Assistant Cashier, William Herrmann; Secretary, George Tourny ; Assist- 
ant Secretary, A. H. Muller; Attorney, W. S. Goodfellow. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS: B. A. Becker, Daniel Meyer. H. Horst- 
mann, Ign. Stelnhart, N. Van Bergen, E. Rohte, H. B. Russ, D. N. 
Walter and N. Ohlandt. 

Wells Fargo & Go. Bank. 

N. E. Corner Sansome & Sutter Streets 

John J. Valentine President 

Homer S. King Manager 

H. Wadsworth .Cashier 

F. L. Llpman Assistant Cashier 

Cash Capital and Surplus 16.250.000 

BRANCHES. 

N. Y. City, H. B. Parsons, Cashier. | Salt Lake City, J. E. Dooly, Cashier 

Portland, Or., R. M. Dooly, Cashier. 

Directors— John J. Valentine, Benj. P. Cheney, Oliver Eldridge, Henry 

E. Huntington, Homer S. King, George E. Gray, John J. MoCook, John 

Berm Ingham, Dudley Evans. 

London, Paris and American Bank, Limited. 

N.W. Cob. Sansome & Sutter Sis. 

Subscribed Capital 13,500,000 

Paid Up Capital 12,000,000 

ReserveFund • 850,000 

Head Office 40 Threadneedle Street, London, B.C. 

AGENTS — New York— Agency of the London, Paris, and American 
Bank Limited, No. 10 Wall Street, N. Y. Pabis— Messrs. Lazard, Freres 
& Cie, 17 Boulevard Polssonlere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the 
world. Commercial and Travelers' Credits issued. 

SIQ. OREENEBAUMl M . naIrBra 
O. ALTSCHUL j- Manage™. 

Security Savings Bank. 

222 Montgomery St.. Mills Building. 

INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. 

LOANS MADE. 

DIRECTORS. 
William Alvord S. L.Abbot Jr. H.H.Hewlett 

Wm. Baboook O.D.Baldwin E. J. MoCutohen 

Adam Grant W.S.Jones R. H. Pease 

Continental Building & Loan Association of California. 

Established In 1889. - 222 Sansome St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Subscribed Capital, 87,000,000 Profit and Reserve Fund, $100,000 

Paid-in Capital - - - 1,000,000 Monthly income, over - - 75,000 

Dr. Ed. E Hill, President. Capt. Oliver Eldridge, Vice-President. 
Wm. Corbin, Secretary and General Manager. 



i6 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 6 1898. 



INSURANCE 

MANAGER Willard O. Wayman, of the Merchants' 
Fire, who has been in Colorado during the past two 
weeks, is home again. 

Col. William Macdonald of the London and Lancashire 
has returned with his bride from a visit to Los Angeles 
and vicinity. 

Among the insurance companies subscribing for the 
United States Government war loan bonds are the Liver- 
pool and London and Globe, $100,000; New York Life In- 
surance Company, $20,000,000; Mutual Life Insurance 
Company, $20,000,000; Coniinental Fire Insurance Com- 
pany, $500,000; Weed & Kennedy, $100,000; Manhattan 
Fire, $500,000; Williamsburg City, $100,000; London and 
Lancashire, $200,000; German-American, $100,000. 

Leslie A. Wright, assistant manager of the Sun Fire, is 
in Los Angeles. 

Edward Brown and wife are rusticating in the Santa 
Cruz mountains. 

Charles Stuart, formerly Pacific Coast manager of the 
Western and British America, has enlisted as a private 
and wiil go to the Philippines with the next consignment 
of Uncle Sam's volunteers. 

President Moore of the Pacific Mutual is visiting in 
Southern California. 

John Landers, Coast manager of the Manhattan, it at 
Lake Tahoe. 

G. C. Hollway has been appointed special ageut for the 
Home Fire's Southern California and Arizona department, 
with headquarters at Los Angeles. 

Vice-President Tillinghast is still looking for the proper 
party to represent the Provident Savings Life in North- 
ern California. A department will be created in the 
southern portion of the State, with headquarters in Los 
Angeles. 

The Weekly Benefit Society of America has re-insured 
with the Fidelity Mutual Aid Association of this city. 

Clarence M. Smith, of the Manhattan Mutual Life, who 
has been visiting on the Coast during the past two months 
in company with Mrs. Smith, has returned to his desk 
this week. 

William Sexton is spending his vacation in the moun- 
tains. 

M. R. Higgins, general superintendent of the Pacific 
Mutual Life, has just completed a tour of the United 
States in the interest of his company. 

Henry C. Keller of the Westchester is in Oregon. 

Wm. H. Bayley of the North British and Mercantile is 
in Colorado. 

A. L. Reed, the veteran life underwriter, who has de- 
voted the past five years to extensive fruit growing and 
stock raising operations in this State, is back in harness 
again with the Fidelity Mutual Aid of San Francisco as 
manager. 

The proposition of the fire insurance companies to pay 
their internal revenue tax on monthly statements sworn 
to by the president and secretary, instead of stamping 
each policy as they are now permitted to do with open 
marine policies, has not met with favor from Internal 
Revenue Commissioner Scott. 

The Connecticut Fire has rei-ioved to California street. 

Thn Prudential Insurance Company of America will in- 
crease its capital to $5,000,000. 

The license of the Connecticut Fire has been cancelled 
by the Kansas Insurance Commissioner because the com- 
pany refused to permit an examination of its affairs. 

Ins st Upon Having Your Ticket to New York, Boston, or 

Other Eastern Cities 
Mead over the Nickel Plate (N. Y. C. A: St. L. K. II.), the popular 
low-rate short line, tjuick time, unexcelled accommodations, and 
no extra fares charged. Jay W. Adams. Pacific Coast Passenger 
Agent, 37 Crocker Building. San Francisco. Cal. 



Alw-iys in order, and always appreciated are Argonaut and J. F. 
Cutter Whiskies. They are not like the gold stories tnat come from 
Alaska for the reason that there is do discount on them. Used 
everywhere they are the highest evidence of the distiller's art. 
E. Martin it Co., 411 Market street, sole agents for the United States. 

Jackson's Napa Soda water cures dyspepsia. 




iV 



marine DnRumtEirr. 




Capital Subscribed.. $4,482 7 50 

LONDON ASSURANCE, capital paid u P 2.241,37s 

Assets 19,195,145 

Capital Subscribed .. $5,000 OOO 

OCEAN MARINE. Capital Paid Up 500.000 

Assets 2,502,050 



INSURANCE. 



FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

Firemans Fund 

INSURANCE COMPANY, OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL, 

Capital, $1,000,000. Assets, $3,500,000 



PALATINE 



INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited), OF MANCHESTER, ENGLAND. 

SOLID SECURITY. OVER $9,000,000.00 RESOURCES 

CHAS. A. LATON, Manager 480 California St., S. F. 
Fibi Insdhanci. 

CONNECTICUT FIRE INSURANCE CO. OF HARTFORD. 

Capital Paid Up tl.OOO.OOJ 

Assets 8,300,1118 

Surplus to Policy Holders 1,668,88; 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager. 

GOLIN M. BOYD. gVgSjSffflSg 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INSURANCE CO., LIMITED, 

OF LIVERPOOL. 

Capita', M,700,OOI 

BALFOUR, 3UTHRIE & CO., Agents, 

No. 810 California st. , S K 

Founded A. D. 1792 

Insurance Company ol North America 

OF PHILADELPHIA, PESN. 

Paid-up Capital 18,000,000 

Surplus to Policy Holders 5,032,016 

JAMES D. BAILEY, General Agent, 412 California St.. S. F. 

ROYAL EXCHANGE ASSURANCE, OF LONDON, 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, A. D. 1726. 

Capital Paid Up. 18,446,100. Assets, t21.584.413. 

Surplus to Policy Holders, t8.980.25l. 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager. FRANK W. DICKSON, Ass't Manager. 

501-503 Montgomery St., corner Sacramento. 

PHOENIX ASSURANCE CO. OF LONDON *«*«*-« 
PROVIDENCE-WASHINGTON INSURANCE CO. i»~rpor.t«i 179. 

BUTLER ft HALDAN, General Agents, 

418 California St., S * 

THE THURINGIA INSURANCE COMPANY. 

Of ERFURT, GEUKAN '.. - 
Capital, 12,250,000 Assets. tlO.984.24R. 
Pacific Coast Department: 204-208 SANSOME ST., S. F. 

VOSS. CONRAD & CO., General Minagws. 



August 6, 1898. 



sax francisco m:\vs u;tti:r. 



17 



'•• ttft'tlll 



HOME DEGORATIOM 

iim mniiiiinmummi i 



s 

mi 1 iitt 



!- 



BY the name Colonial, a great variety of stales is in- 
cluded. Since very little of the better sort of furni- 
ture was made in America during colonial times, the 
various articles coming from France, England, or Holland 
were, with some modifications to suit the simple require- 
ments of the colonists, like that in use in the respective 
countries from whence it came. The Chippendale designs 
were those most extensively introduced in the northern 
colonies, while the French colonial furniture of New Orleans 
was quite as different as that which the sturdy Dutchmen 
brought from their native Holland to embellish their 
American homes. 

To criticise a piece of furniture because it is not ab- 
solutely correct in every detail, according to the best ex- 
amples of the period of which it is a copy, is to presume 
too much. Xo one can determine where our finally recog- 
nized style began and just where another ended. It was 
an intermingling at all times. There is no doubt that the 
shell ornamentation and cabriole legs in the Dutch furni- 
ture of the Renaissance period were due to the influence 
of the French. When such a famous 
artist as David, best known through 
his portrait of Madame Recamier, 
especially designed and decorated a 
writing-table for Marie Antoinette, 
and employed the most pronounced 
features of the previous period, the 
cabriole legs and swell front, the con- 
sistency of having various styles in 
one room is apparent. 

Moreover, modern inventions have 
so simplified the construction of furni- 
ture that the laborious handwork 
effects of centuries ago are now re- 
produced at a cost within the reach 
of those of even moderate means. 
The expensive feature is no longer a 
bar to beauty, but the ability to make 
appropriate selections so as to secure 
that harmony of elegance and comfort 
so essential to the making of a home 
is needful. Art in furniture has made 
wonderful strides in the past ten years, 
not in originating new designs, but in 
recognizing the fixed principles of de- 
sign in all the best masters. The 
productions of the best manufacturers 
of the day are placed by the aid of 
machinery within the reach of ail who 
have an appreciation of the eternal 
fitness of things. 



A new fad that promises to have at 
least temporary popularity is the use 
of burlap for floor covering, either in 
the place of carpets as a background 
for rugs or as a filler around rugs and 
carpet centers. The use of burlap 
for this purpose, however, is still very 
much in its infancy, and so it cannot 
be stated as yet with any degree of 
certainty just how satisfactory it will 
prove. Experience and experiment 
only can determine this, but if it is 
found aftet use that it meets the re- 
quirements it will prove a decided 
boon to the small householder and the 
cottager who desires to put into his 
dwelling the maximum of taste and 
comfort with the minimum of expense. 

This burlap for use on floors differs 
from that to which we have become 
accustomed as wall covering in that it 
is of a much stronger and finer grade 
and is carefully dyed, while the other 



is simply painted or stained. The floor burlap has also a 
special backing, which prevents the dust and dirt 
sifting through onto the floor, keeping it instead 
on the surface where it can be eaMlv swept away. 
The dyeing loaves the burlap in a soft flexible con- 
dition which makes it a comparatively simple 
task to lay it. either by sewing in breadths, as is done 
with an ordinary ingrain carpet, or tacking the edges as 
one would a matting. In laying it, it is well to observe one 
point that will prove of advantage, namely: to use two 
thicknesses of carpet lining instead of one, as this double 
iayer will give a softer feeling under foot and will also add 
considerably to the life of the material. 



«X 
sc 



appreciated donation for the sick and wounded 
soldiers was that of G. H. Mumm & Co., who gave 
1200 bottles of extra dry wine for their use. Lieutenant- 
Colonel J. M. Brown has just written a letter to the Com- 
pany thanking it for the gift, which is highly prized by the 
Surgeon-General's office. Here is a fine example for other 
firms. G. H. Mumm & Co. have made a generous contri- 
bution. 



President Faure devotes two or three hours every 

morning to private reading. 



t : 1 




The laundress is sure of satisfactory results <t 

in her work if she uses Ivory Soap. Linens are | 

of immaculate whiteness ; no dirt or streaks any- I 

where. There's no room for criticism in the work * 

when brought home. * 

Ivory Soap is cheaper than common soaps | 

in the end. | 

A WORD OF WARNING.— There are many white soaps, each represented to be " just 3J 

as good as the ' Ivory';" they ARE NOT, but like all counterfeits, lack the peculiar and g 

remarkable qualities of the genuine. Ask for " Ivory " Soap and Insist upon getting it. ^ 

CoDjright.WW, b, Tl,6 Pr U rt<r ft Cmblo Co , Cincinnati. ;jj 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 6 1898. 




THE wedding of Miss 
Louise Dutton and Cap- 
tain Lewis J. Leland, chap- 
lain of the First Tennessee 
\ Volunteers, took place on 
t Wednesday afternoon at the 
Dutton residence on Sacra- 
mento street. Appropriate to the times, and in compli- 
ment to the groom, the bower in which the ceremony was 
performed by the Rev. J. G. Schliemann, chaplain of the 
Kansas Regiment of Volunteers, was formed of two of our 
Star Spangled Banners combined with delicate green 
foliage, other flags of the national colors being used for 
decorative purposes throughout the other rooms of the 
house. The bride, who wore a stylish tailor-made costume 
of blue cloth, was unattended, but the groom was sup- 
ported by Captain Samuel O. Murphy, of his regiment, as 
best man. A handsome wedding dijeuner followed the 
ceremony, the guests consisting of relatives and a few in- 
timate friends, and the brief honeymoon trip will doubtless 
be supplemented by another longer one with the Philip- 
pines as the locale. 

The engagement of Miss Hilda Castle ard Thos. L. Cun- 
ningham has been formally announced, and the date of 
their wedding will be made known ere long. 

The Pavilion still continues to be the scene of receptions 
to the soldiers and military drills, the Army and Navy 
Christian Commission fund being the beneficiary of the 
fancy drill given by the Twentieth Kansas Regiment on 
Thursday evening. The Seventh California Regiment of 
Volunteers are to be the heroes of to-night's reception, as 
it will be a sort of farewell to them ere they depart for 
Manila. The Red Cross will benefit by the proceeds and 
it is anticipated that a large crowd will be on hand. The 
First Tennessee Regiment was given a reception by the 
Epworth League at theM. E. Church on California street 
on Tuesday evening. 

August promises to be the banner month at Del Monte 
this year. Many of those who have spent July there will 
remain during this month, and in addition there will be, 
among others, Mr. and Mrs. Dan Murphy, Mrs. Sam 
Knight, Miss Follis and Miss Flood, Mrs. Phoebe Hearst, 
Miss Sophie Pierce, Miss Nellie Hillyer, Mr. and Mrs. Ned 
Hopkins and their daughters, who have just returned 
from their visit to Boca; Harry Holbrook, Miss Ollie Hol- 
brood, Mrs. Tevis, Mrs. Fred Sharon and her daughter 
Miss Breckinridge. Hermann Oelrichs is most prolific in 
devising new forms of amusement for his friends, and is 
first and foremost in golf, which seems to be taking front 
rank in the diversions at Del Monte. 

The determination of Miss May Hoffman to follow in the 
footsteps of Miss Laura McKinstry and become a profes- 
sional nurse has caused consternation in the ranks of her 
admirers and much regret among her friends. The loss 
of these two bright young ladies will be felt in the swim, 
where, for many seasons past, no function was deemed 
complete that did not number either or both of them 
among the guests. However, the war has caused a de- 
mand for just such services as they are desirous of giving, 
and no doubt many a poor fellow will benefit by society's 
loss, and their gratitude prove compensation sufficient for 
all the social pleasures these young ladies forego. 

Dr. Frank Robinson is another of society's beaux who 
has gone a soldier to be, having enlisted in the regular 
army. His detail will be as Surgeon to the 1st Utah 
Cavalry, which will spend the ensuing few weeks on guard 
duty in the Yosemite Valley. 

Announcement is made of the engagement of Miss 
Henriette Edith Crane, daughter of the late Byron G. 
Crane, of Crane, Hastings & Co., and Mr. John Perret 
Wallace. The wedding will take place in the fall. Mrs. 
Crane and ber daughter reside at 3000 California street. 



San Francisco has been well represented at Santa Cruz 
the past week, among the visitors from here being Mr. 
and Mrs. McBean, Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph Spreckels, Miss 
Minnie Jolliffe, Mrs. Albert Dibblee, Miss Juliet Williams, 
Mr. and Mrs. Paul Jarboe, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Green, Miss 
Rogers, Mrs. J. P. Hale, Wilfred Chapman, Harry Stet- 
son, General Houghton, Will Heath, Jim Flood, and Mrs. 
Charles Page. 

The Hotel Rafael has proved 
to be one of the pleasantest 
places to be found outside of 
San Francisco the past week. 
The excessive fog and chill of 
the city was only felt there in 
a mild degree, and the many 
pleasant people assembled as 
guests there rendered the 
slight confinement of some of 
them within doors the early part 
of the week far from irksome. 
Dinners and luncheons continue 
to be quite a feature, friends 
from the city coming over to 
enjoy the hospitality of those 
who are making that hostelrie 
their summer locale. The 
Misses Lillian and Maud O'Con- 
nor were recently joint host- 
esses at one of the prettiest 
luncheons of the season, which 
they gave at Fairfax Villa, en- , 
tertaining thereat Mrs. Ansel 
Easton, the Baroness Von 
Schroeder, Mrs. Morton Mit- 
chell, Mrs. D. B. Davidson, 
Mrs. Will Whittier, Mrs. R. P. 
Schwerin, Miss Ella Morgan, 
and Miss Folger. The paper 
chase of the Marin Hunt Club last Saturday was one of the 
largest meets of the season. The eight mile route was 
gone over in a spirited manner in the short time of forty 
minutes, Baron Von Schroeder winning first gentleman's 
prize and Miss Morgan the first lady's prize. 

The Reverend W. I. Kip has been visiting Highland 
Springs; Mr. and Mrs. I. W. Hellman and family will 
spend the rest of the summer at their San Rafael Villa; 
they passed the month of July at Lake Tahoe; Mr. and 
Mrs. W. I. Kip and the Misses Clemmie and Mary Kip 
have returned from Blue Lakes and are at the Hotel 
Richelieu; A. J. Bowie, the mining engineer, is one of the 
arrivals of the week from Alaskan wilds; Mrs. Hitchcock 
and Mrs. Coit are at the Palace, having arrived from the 
East last week. Mrs. J. W. Mackay will spend the autumn 
months at a country place she has recently taken in 
County Kent, England, where her sister, the Countess 
Telfener, her daughter, the Princess Colonna, and their 
children will bear her company. 

The serious illness of Mrs. Wm. Alvord cast quite a 
damper over the spirits of her relatives and the intimate 
friends who are at Del Monte, but she has somewhat im- 
proved this week, and again they all hope for the best. 




Joftannid. 



Of exceptional purity and excellence. 






H. ISAAG dONES, M. D. 

Eye, Ear, Nose, and Throat. 

Office, 222 Post street, between Grant avenue and Stockton Sts., S. F. 
Hours, 10 A. m. to 4 p. m. Sunday by appointment. 

Tel. Grant 101. 



HERCULES Marine Oil Engine !£g?2S£L 

surest engine 
Tor launches, yachts, and pleasure boats. HEticn.Ks Gas Engine Works, 
407 Sansome street, San Francisco. 



August 6, 1898. 



SAX FRANCISi O NI-WS LKTTHR. 



'9 



An exccedini;l.V handsome j^irl, who f>r several 
has been the guest of Miss Ltliie McKenoa. 
Haven, is Miss J. Meta Hndenfeldt, of San Prai 

Hadenfeldt comes directly bv her beaut. 
New York World of July lf.th.'her mother bavins 
belle in San Francisco years a>ro. Miss Hndenfeldt 
with a beautiful figure. She has a face the contour of 
which is perfect. Educated at Mills' t' »ileyo. in Fruit- 
vale, she went abroad in 1<S:i to study painting and 
voice culture. Since then she has had many offers 
into opera, but has preferred to sing for her friends onlv, 
leav.ng the professional life to those less fond of society. 
She is an amateur actress of marked ability. The fact 
that she was chosen queen of a carniva' given a year or 
two ago by the first German clubs of San Francisco is 
proof sufficient that she is possessed of- striking bei 
While in New Haven she was the recipient of a great deai 
of attention, more, in fact, than almost any other girl who 
ever visited here. She will leave New Haven the last of 
July as she is to return to San Francisco on the 1st of 
August. 

It goes without saying that all society, and especially 
those who are dwelling at San Mateo County, are entering 
heart and soul into the coming flte to be held at the 
Crocker place next Saturday for the benefit of St. Mat- 
thews Parish. The ladies have been working industriously 
at pretty articles which ate to adorn the tables for the 
sale of fancy goods, and some of them are spoken of as be- 
ing ''just lovely." The entertainments will be of a diver- 
sified character, and nothing left undone to make it the 
flte of the decade; the indications are it will be a grand 
success. 

A considerable number of guests are arriving at Kenil- 
worth Inn for August and September. On Friday night 
a progressive whist party was given at the Inn, after 
which a delicious lunch was served by the host. 

Mr. and Mrs. Simon Erlanger, of Berkeley, gave a most 
enjoyable military dinner last Monday to a number of 
tbeir friends. During the evening an impromptu enter- 
tainment was given, which was followed by dancing until 
a late hour. 

The wedding of Dr. Edward H. Lake, only son of Louis 
Lake, and Edna J. Scott, only daughter of Joseph W. 
Scott, will take place early in the spring. 

Dr. Byron W. Haines, who fcr a long time has occupied 
offices at 14 Grant avenue, has removed to newly-appointed 
and elegant quarters at 813 Sutter street. 

A. June, the sculptor, has just completed a bust of Col. 
James F. Smith, the popular officer of the First California 
Volunteers. The work is well executed and is an excel- 
lent likeness of the Colonel. It will be presented to him 
by a number of his admirers. 

At Metropolitan Temple, on Friday evening, the 12th 
inst., Wm. L. Tomlins, of Chicago, Y will deliver alectureon 
"Music, its Nature and Influence." The series promises 
to be of exceptional interest. 

The Sons and Daughters of St. George will give a liter- 
ary entertainment and ball on the evening of the 10th 
inst. at Union Square Hall, on Post street, near Mason, 
in aid of the Red Cross Society. Music will be furnished 
by the First Regiment band, Tennessee Volunteers. Ad- 
mission 25 cents. 

Los Lomas Parlor No. 72, N. D. G. W., will give a cas- 
carone party at Mission Parlor Hall, Seventeenth street, 
near Valencia, on Friday, August 19th. 

Mr. Fred Poisson, the well-known mining expert of 
London, is in the city on a visit. He will remain here 
some time. 

BURGLAR insurance not only protects you against loss 
from thieves, but it ensures the capture and punish- 
ment of the burglars whenever it is possible. Shainwald, 
Buckbee & Co. are local agents for the Fidelity and Cas- 
ualty Company of New York. Rates of insurance are most 
reasonable and protection absolute. 

GAS. 

We want to c-u b-a customer of ours. Get a two-burner gas stove 
tor one dollar and fifty cents. C. Brown & Son, 807 Market street. 



Jackson's Napa Soda knocks rheumatism. 



.****+«**. 



^ I /•; Kl I < T FOOD -a.« Whnltsnmc as It In 

«: 

« 



livUcinun.' 



Walter Baker &Co!s 

||fc Breakfast 

Cocoa I 




Trnde-Murk. 



The Standard for 
Purity and 
Excellence 



Costs less than one cent a cup 

Our Trade-Mark on Every Package. 



WALTER BAKER & CO. Ltd. 

DORCHESTER, MASS. 

ESTABLISHED 1700. 




$1.00 — 

"PARTRIDGE" 
Fountain Pen 

With fine Gold Pen Point. 

JOHN PARTRIDGE, 
Stationer, Printer, Bookbinder. 



IMPORTANT TO LAWYERS 
~ BRIEFS 

Printed Id a night if required. 
JOHN PARTRIDGE, 
Printer, 
306 California Street, S.F 



San FrancisGO Dress -Gutting School, 

French tailor method taught. Full course of instruction in the 
art of Dressmaking. Patterns cut to order. Terms reasonable. 

NO. 916 MARKET ST., Opposite the Emporium, San Francisco. 



LUDLM.^ 

928 Sutter St. 



ELOCUTION and 

DRAMATIC ART 



Lft GRANDE LAUNDRY, 



Telephone Bush 12. 



Principal office, 23 Powell St., opp. Baldwin Hotel. 

Branch— 11 Taylor St., near Golden Gate avenue. 

Laundry— Twelfth St., between Folsom and Howard Sts., San Franelsco. 



Weak Men and Women 



Should use DAMIANA BIT- 
TERS, the great Mexican rem- 
edy ; it gives health and strength to the Sexual Organs. Depot at 323 Mar- 
ket street, San Francisco. Send for circular. 



>R. T. FELIX GOURAUD'S ORIENTAL 
CREAM, OR MAGICAL BEAUTIFIER. 



Removes Tan, Pimples, Freckles, Moth 
Patches, Rash, and Skin Diseases, and 
every blemish on beauty, and defies de- 
tection. It has stood the test of 48 years 
and is so harmless we taste it to be sure 
it is properly made. Accept no counter- 
feit of similar name. Dr. L. A. Sayre 
said to a lady of the haut-ton (a pa- 
tient) : "As you ladies will use them, I 
recommend ' Gouraud's Cream' as the 
least harmful of all the Skin prepara- 
tions." For sale by all Druggists and 
"Fancy-goods Dealers in the United 
States, Canadas, and Europe 




FERD. T. HOPKINS, Prop'r. 

37 Great Jones St., N. Y. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 6, 1898. 




New York, 



August 1, 1898. 



THE New York Mining Board, like unto your San Fran- 
cisco Stock Exchanges, has virtually suspended busi- 
ness, pending some hole being discovered out of which they 
can crawl to escape the war tax on sales. While in San 
Francisco the stock managers will reduce capitalization to 
oil the machinery, the stock dealt in by the New York 
mining brokers are wildcat Colorado corporations, and as 
the business at this end doesn't amount to anything any- 
how, there is no incentive to disincorporate and reincor- 
porate to meet the exigency. Ergo, the New York Ex- 
change will quietly subside. Hie jacet, etc. 

* • # 

Many contradictory reports are circulating in the upper 
circles. Among the on dits is one that the Countess Cas- 
tellane has put a check rein on the Count's expenditures, 
and that he is kicking in the traces like a wild steer. An- 
other: That Cornelius Vanderbilt Sr. is coming home to 
forget Cornelius Jr. 's distasteful marriage, which would 
be eminently proper and nice. Another: That W. K. Van- 
derbilt (whose divorced wife married Belmont of Newport), 
will presently marry the Duchess of Manchester, who was 
a Miss Yznaga of New York. This report has often been 
denied, and is based chiefly on wind. Another: That Wil- 
liam Waldorf Astor, who abjured his American home and 
citizenship because he was defeated for Congress, after a 
house to house canvas in the slums on the East side, will 
marry the widow Goelet, whose weeds are still quite fresh 
and blooming, and so cement together two of the largest 
landed interests of New York. 

* * * 

The following "personal " in one of the New York dailies 
may interest some people out your way: - 'If lady with fine 
gray hair, last year in San Francisco, afterward ill at St. 
Luke's Hospital, New York, with typhoid fever, desires 
to meet an admirer, just arrived from San Francisco and 
anxious to make her acquaintance, kindly address X. Y. Z." 
Strange to say, the words "object matrimony," which 
are always included in this class of advertisements, are ab- 
sent. It is simply a case of platonic affection. 

* * * 

One of the dramatic critics, noting the costume — per- 
haps lack of it— which petite Edna Wallace Hopper wears 
in Yankee Doodle Dandy, declared that on her appearance 
all the thermometers in the neighborhood were immedi- 
ately bursted. Edna is one of the sensations of the new 
extravaganza, and in the cutting to which it is being sub- 
jected, there is no danger of interference with her ther- 
mometer smashing costume. It is the un-warmest get-up 
that was ever seen at the Casino. If Sydney Smith could 
have been similarly attired he need not have wished on a 
warm night to sit in his bones. 

* * # 

The world is getting gooder— not the journalistic World, 
but this material, altogether wicked world. Susie Swift 
(they say she is a native-born Californienne), who figured 
recently, after a series of adventures and misadventures 
as a Brigadier-General in the Army of Salvation, has gone 
into a nunnery, and will hereafter consecrate herself to 
good deeds. Ansen Phelps Stokes Jr., who has a big for- 
tune to burn whenever he wants to light a lucifer, has de- 
termined to become a minister of the Gospel. With his 
big fortune he may be a power of good, and the wicked 
world will warmly welcome bim to the fold. He comes of 
a family as old as the hills, and it includes quite a number 
upon whom the young pastor may work with saving in- 
fluence. 



If you should see a young man of eight and twenty, wear- 
ing pointed shoes and a mustache over- waxed and' twisted 
furiously under his nose, five feet and six inches in height, 



drop into the Palace courtyard some foggy August morn- 
ing, that will be what is left of Vittorio Torino Giovanni 
Maria de Savoy-Aosta alias Count of Turin, who escaped 
from Newport a few days ago, and is supposed to have 
taken himself off to San Francisco in his search for a 
bride sufficiently encumbered with ducats to become a 
possible future Queen of Rome. He must be pretty well 
fagged out, for they led him a terrible dance in the mael- 
strom of summer society — Newport. 

P. S. — That sly old profligate, the King of the Belgians, 
promises to be along presently. 



The yellow journal, wnose proprietor is young Mr. 
Hearst, has it in for General Shatter. It will not be an 
open-handed, straight-from-the-shoulder attack, but un- 
derhanded and indirectly. The first charge is that Gen- 
eral Shafter is personally responsible for the appearance 
of yellow fever in the Santiago camps, to be followed by 
others. Cause: General Shafter exiled three Journal re- 
porters, and confiscated 40,000 Journals and " Remember 
the Maine " placards in the interests of law and order. 

Entre Nous. 




HER TROUBLES OVER. 

Miss Blackford. — Mornin', Auntv ! How comes yo' ain't 
washur on yo' wash day? ' 

Aunty Easeford - Lawd save yo'. chile ! I don' haf to wuk 
hard no mo' Ah dun got some o' dat James Pvles Pearline 
an hit mek de wnshiu' so drefful easy dat ma' pickanuiuy does it 
an nuks its jes' playin'.— /Yowr Puck. New York. 

CITY INDEX AND PURCHASER'S GUIDE 



RESTAURANTS. 
Maison Tortoni, French Rotlsserle, 111 O'Farrell street. 

rooms and banquet ball. S. Constantlbt, Proprietor. 
Poodle Dog Restaurant, S. E. 

dining and banquet rooms. 



Private dining 



cor. Grant ave. and Bush st. Private 
Tel. 429. A. B. Blanco & B Bron. 

Say state Oyster House and Grill Room. 15 Stockton street and 100 
O'Farrell street. N. M. Adler Proprietor. Telephone Main 6067. 



Or. Hall, 1228 Market street. 



MEDICAL. 
Diseases or women and children. 



POSTAGE STAMP DEALERS. 
Hawaiian stamps a specialty. MAKINS & CO 508 Market street. 
Selections on approval: any place in world, w. F. GREANY,827Brannan 
The W. H. Hollls Stamp Oo., (Incorporated), 106 O'Farrell St., S.F. 

BOILERMAKERS. 
P. F. Dundon's San Francisco Iron Works, 314, 816, and 818 Main street. 
Iron Work of every description designed and constructed. 

DllOWtLL CO. Bookbinder, Paper-Ruler, Printer, 

and Blank-Book Manufacturer. 
Niantic block, corner Clay and Sansome streets. 



August 6, 1898. 



SAN PRANCISCO NBW8 LETTER. 





FRIDE has a fall, and so has conceit; at least, so that 
fascinating society young gentleman, whose chief 
boast is that he has been around the world, and "cannot 
possibly be taken in," has discovered. He was out at the 
Chutes on Thursday night, seeking for 
an adventure, and the adventure discov- 
ered him. He found her melancholy, sad. 
alone, and not slow. He offered his 
precious escortship and protection 
against the rude soldiery and the ribald 
citizen. Modestly she accepted it. She 
was married, he learned, and to a vin- 
dictively jealous Spaniard, and as he 
was drinking the waters or wallowing 
in the healing mud ot some spring, she 
had escaped strict surveillance and 
wandered out to see the fireworks. She 
was alternately pathetic and gay, and 
the young man had made a conquest of 
which he could boast. Would she go 
to dinner the next night? After some 
hesitation she consented. They went. 
It was to be awfully private, because 
her reputation, etc., a married woman, 
a stilleto-bearing Spaniard, with a diseased liver, and lia- 
ble to return any moment from the springs and slay both 
alike. Danger added fascination to tbe meeting. She 
must be careful — and she was careful. She drank him into 
inanity. He went home in a hack, and all that he remem- 
bers of the meeting was the Spaniard-fearing dame drink- 
ing cocktails and leading him to places unknown even to a 
man who was supposed to know the town like a book. He 
was up only Sunday, and thinks that for a woman who had 
a jealous husband and must be careful of her reputation 
she had a remarkably long and well-developed thirst. 

* * * 

'Tis said that of all the places where Fashion congre- 
gates, Burlingame has the largest supply of men, but then 
the married men count as beaux there, and however 
charming they may be (and are) to dance with to drive 
with, and yes — to flirt with — they are not profitable as 
"eligibles," so don't figure as such with parental minds. It 
is true that our pretty buds find the married men quite as 
delightful as single ones, as a visit to Del Monte at this 
time will show, but this especial bud was always given to 
liking attention no matter if from another woman's pro- 
perty or not, and in this case the wife is so many miles 

away she don't count. 

* * * 

Enthusiasm for the soldier lad may be carried a little 
too far, at least so thought some people the other day 
when they saw a pretty blonde girl wearing upon her arm 
a disreputable pink garter which some departing soldier 
had flung at her from his vessel. 

* * * 

Since the departure of the Military Governor with his 
glittering staff the Medico's wife has to content her hand- 
some self with small fry in the Volunteer line, but anything 

in buttons "goes." 

* * * 

On dit the gallant Yachtsman has succumbed to the 
charms of the golden tressed widow which may account for 
his choice of locale for passing the recent holidays. 

* # * 

Miss Betty is nothing if not cultured and clever, say her 
friends, so to hear that she is busy over in Ross Valley 
finding a rime for Deering, Fearing, Endearing, etc:, 
will not surprise everyone. 

Japan, England and America are not likely to form an offensive 
and defensive alliance against all the rest of the World, but Geo. T. 
Mar-h &Co., at 625 Market street, under the Palace hotel, are in 
receipt of the rioe*t and latest stock of satsama, ivory, carved ware, 
vases, tapestries and other elegant Japanese goods. 

Kick if you don't get pure Jackson's Napa Soda. 



The FINEST JjIN Imported. 

Especially Adapted for Family Use 
and Medicinal Purposes. 

In Large Square White Bottles. 



TGA-E VBRK 



Annexed Trade Mark - - 
Appears on Cap and - - 
is blown in on shoulder- 
Sold by Grocers and Dealers,..Beware of Filled-up Bottles 




CHARLES MEINECKE & CO., 

314 Sacramento St., S. F. 



Agents. 



AFRAID 

OF 

BURGLARS 



218-220 Montgomery St. 
Mills B'ld'g., S. F. 



Then insure against them 
by a policy in the Fidel- 
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of New York. Your mind 
will be easy. The rates 
are very low. 
Full particulars of 

SHAINWALD, 
BUCKBEE 
& CO., 



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1 ANDY CATHARTIC 

CURE CONSTIPATION 




Constipation Afflicts 

part of the people all the time, 
all the people part of the time. 
' Are you a chronic or occasional sufferer from constipation ? 1 
Do you want a sure, pure cure ? 

CASCARETS (eat 'em like candy) will stimulate ; 
your liver, regulate your bowels, leave your i 
Kood clean and rich, sweeten your breath and J 
rr ake your stomach do its work. 

CASCARETS kill disease germs, cure; 

sick headache, taste good and do good, please J 
tie children, destroy and drive off worms and 1 
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A ioc box will prove their merit, and put you on 1 
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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 6, 1898. 



PE RSONAL IS. 

Queen Victoria will soon celebrate her jubilee as 

"Lady of Balmoral." She purchased Balmoral in the 
summer of .1848, and took possession of it in the following 
September. Hence, when she goes there in the autumn 
she will have been a resident of Deesidefor half a century, 
a fact which is to be commemorated by the erection of a 
fountain on the Ballater road. 

If Viscount Wolseley is sent to Canada as governor- 
general, it is believed that Queen Victoria's son, the Duke 
of Connaught, will be made commander-in-chief of the 
British army, a place he is likely to retain permanently, 
like the Duke of Cambridge before him. 

Auguste Bruchet, the philologist, who died a few 

days ago at Cannes, was once employed by the Empress 
Eugenie to teach her how to pronounce French with a 
Parisian accent. 

Piper Findlater has thrown off 

war office restraint. H. E. Moss of 
the Empire palace has completed an 
agreement with the piper to play on 
the Edinburgh stage at the rate of 
1500 a week. Mr. Moss is the head 
of the Empire palaces throughout the 
kingdom, and if Piper Findlater is a 
successful attraction during the next 
week he will in all likelihood go on 
tour as one of the Empire variety 
artists. 

One of the last works on which 

the late Mr. Burne-Jones was engaged 
was the designing of a memorial win- 
dow in Hawarden church to Mr. 
Gladstone. This, it had been hoped, 
would have been erected in the life- 
time of the Grand Old Man, and as the 
gift of his sons and daughters, he 
himself was keenly interested in the 
proposals. 

A few Harvard graduates have 

given money to replace with bronze 
the worn marble inscription tablets 
on the monument to John Harvard, 
which was erected on the burial hill 
in Charleston, Mass., in 1828 to the 
memory of the founder of the uni- 
versity. 

Garner Sims of Providence, R. 

L, a well-known engineer and three 
times a millionaire, lately appeared 
before the United States naval ex- 
amining board. Mr. Sims wished to 
serve in the engine room without pay. 
He will be commissioned as a chief 
engineer. 

Miss Helen Gould, although pos 

sessed of millions, is about to take her 
first voyage across the Atlantic ocean. 
She will visit England this summer, 
and as far as she can arrange it her 
stay will be incognito. 

Morgan Robertson, the young 

American who is winning praise as a 
writer of sea stories, is a son of a 
skipper on the great lakes and went 
to sea at the age of 16. 

Sir Henry Irving has in his pos- 
sessions the sandals worn by Kean 
when the latter played in "Brutus" in 
1818, and also the boots which Kemble 
wore some years later. 

Princess Chimay, after a period 

of comparative obscurity, is soon to 
make another sensational tour of 
the European capitals. The Princess 
has learned a daring wire act. 



THE State Fair will be held this year at Sacramento 
from the 5th to the 17th of September. It will be 
unusually complete and interesting, and is sure to be 
largely attended. Reduced rates will be given on the rail- 
roads, large prizes and purses will be given, and prepara- 
tions are being made for a most successful exhibition of 
the State's resources. 



ftN international fishery, Norwegian art and industrial 
exhibition is now being held at Bergen, Norway. The 
exhibition will close on the 30th of September. It is very 
complete and presents a complete exposition of the fish, 
minerals, arts and sciences of Norway. Many other coun 
tries are also well represented. 



Allen's Press Clipping Bureau. 510 Montgomery street, S. F., deals 
to all kinds of newspaper Information, business personal, political, from 
press of State, Coast, and Country. Tel. Main 1042. 



All sensible people drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



NEVER HAS ANYTHING BEEN SO HIGHLY AND SO JUSTLY PRAISED AS 



VIN MARIANI 



MARIAN! WINE, the FAMOUS TONIC for BODY. NERVES and BRAIN. 



GEN. SIR EVELYN WOOD Says: 




" Regarding the Intantry marching in the recent ma- 
noeuvres it was the best seen during my command at 
Aldershot. Many officers availed themselves of the 
tonic and reconstituent properties of the well-known 
Mariani Wine, the most certain as well as the most 
palatable method o! inducing resistance to fatigue. 
From " The London Sketch." 
HAX 0'REIX, 
The Renowned Writer and Lecturer. Writes: 




Your Vin Mariani is positively marvelous : one glass 
put me on my feet : one bottle made a new man of me. 
Yours gratefully. MAX O'RELL. 

ALL DBUVOISTS. 
PARIS: 41 Ifciukvard Haussmann. London: 83 Mortimer Si 



MARIANI WINE is invaluable at 
this season of the year, when, owing 
to trying climatic conditions, the 
system is especially susceptible to 
attacks of debility and prostration. 

VIN riARIANl (riARIANI WINE) 
has stood the test of thirty-five 
years' trial. It has written endorse- 
ments from more than 8000 Ameri- 
can physicians, in addition to hav- 
ing received cordial recommenda- 
tions from royalty, princes of the 
Church and of the State, and many 
notable personages. 



MARIANI WINE is a tonic pre- 
pared upon careful scientific prin- 
ciples. It contains absolutely no in- 
jurious properties. It gives power 
to the brain, strength to the entire 
nervous system, firmness and elas- 
ticity to the muscles, and richness 
to the blood. It has been aptly de- 
scribed as a promoter of good health 
and longevity. 



MARIANI WINE is specially indi- 
cated for General Debility Weakness 
from whatever causes. Overwork, 
Profound Depression and Exhaus- 
tion, Throat and Lung Diseases, 
Consumption, Halariaand LaCrippe. 



MARIANI WINE Is an adjuvant in 
convalescence and a powerful reju- 
venator. For Overworked Men, Del- 
icate Women, Sickly Children it 
works wonders. Taken with tracked 
Ice, it relieves Summer Prostration 
quickly and effectually. It soothes, 
strengthens and sustains the sys- 
tem. 



To those who will kindly write to 
MARIANI & CO., 52 West 15th Street, 
New York City, will be sent free, book 
containing portraits with endorsements 
of Emperors, Empress, Princes, Cardi- 
nals, Archbishops and other interest- 
ing matter. 

.1 VOID SUBS riTTTTIONS. 
Montreal: 28-30 Hospital S: 



August 6, 1898. 



SAN IK \N\ VVS LETTER. 



*3 



Southern Pacific Co—Pacific System. S an Francisco and North Pacific R'y Co. 



Train* Lthve and »re Due 10 Arrive at BAN FRANCISCO 
(Main LlDf . Pool of Market Street.) 



• I 



from J .'; .... MM 



I Arryrf 



■6:00* Niles. San Joso. and way nations „ •$:** 

110O a. Bealela. Suisun. and Sacramento 10:46 a 

TWa Marysville. Orovillc. and Redding, via Woodland 6:46 P 

7.-00 A Elmtra, Vacavltte and Rumsey 8:46 P 

7:30 a Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo. Napa.Calistoga, Santa Rosa 6:16 p 

8:00a Atlantic Express, Ogden and East 6:46p 

8:80 a San Jose, Stockton, Vallty Spring, lone, Sacramento, 

MarysTllle. Chlco. Tehama, and Red Bluff 4:l6p 

8:80 a Peters, Oakdale, and Jamestown Msp 

'8:30a Milton »7:15P 

9:00a New Orleans Express, Merced, Fresno, Bakersfleld, Santa 
Barbara, Los Angeles, Doming. El Paso. New Orleans, and 
East 6:46 P 

10.00 a Vallejo, Martinez, and way stations 7.4b p 

•1 :U0 p Sacramento River steamers. *S:0U P 

San Jose. NUes, and Way Stations 10:16 a 

2:00 p Ltvermore, Mendota, Hanford, and Vlsalla 4:16 p 

Llvermore, San Jose. Niles and Way Stations 110:15 a 

4:00 p Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, Napa, Calls toga. El Verano 

and Santa Rosa 9:16 A 

4:00 p Benlcla. Vacavllle, Woodland, Knight's Landing, Marys- 
ville, Orovtlle, and Sacramento 10:45a 

4 :30 p Niles. San Jose, Tracy, and Stockton 7 :15 p 

4:30 p Stockton and Lodi 12:15 P 

4.30 P Lathrop. Modesto, Merced. Fresno, Mojave, Santa Barbara 

and Los Angeles . 7:45 A 

4:30 P Martinez. Merced, (Raymond for Yosemlte) and Fresno 12:15 P 

4:3u p Santa Fe Route, Atlantic Express, for Mojave and East.... 6:45p 
6 :00 p European mall, Ogden and East 9 Ah a 

•«:00p Vallejo 12:15p 

6:00 P Haywards. Niles and San Jose 7:45 a 

J7^00 p Vallejo, Port Costa^and way stations ....J9:45p 

8 :00p Oregon Express, Sacramento, Marysville, Redding, Port- 

land. Puget Sound and East 8:15a 



San Leandro and Haywards Local. (Foot of Market St.) 



8:00 a] 
9:00 a 
10:00 a 
ill. 00 A I 
112:00 11^ 
t3:00 P 
6:00 p I 
7:00 p| 



Melrose, Seminary Park, 
fltchburg, elmhtjrst, 
San Leandro. 
South San Leandro. 
Estudilxo. Lorenzo, 
Chhrry, and Haywards. 

i Runs through to Niles. 
t From Niles 



7:15 A 
£*9:45 A 
10:45 A" 
11:45 A 
12:45 P 
fl:45 P 
J2:45 P 
15:45 P 

7:45 P 



Coast Division (Narrow Gauge). (Foot of Market St.) 

$7:45 a Santa Cruz Excursion, Santa Cruz and Principal Way 

Stations '. J8 :05 P 

8:15a Newark, Centerville. San Jose, Felton, Boulder Creek, Santa 

Cruz and way stations 5:50 p 

■2:15 p Newark, Centerville, San Jose, New Almaden, Felton, Boul- 
der Creek, Santa Cruz, and principal way stations *10:5UA 

4:15 P San Jose, Glenwood and way stations 9:20 A 

04 : 15 P Boulder Creek and Santa Cruz 7 9:20 a 

CREEK ROUTE FERRY. 

From San Francisco— Foot of Market street (Slip 8).— *7:15, 9:00, and 
11:00 a. n., Jl:00.«2:00, 13:00, *4:00,t5:00 and «6:00p. m. 

From Oakland— Foot of Broadway.— *6:00, 8:00, 10:00 a. m.; 112:00, *1:00, 
lg:00,*3:00, 14:00 *5:00P. M. 

Coast Division (Broad Gauge). (Third and Townsend streets). 

•7 :00 A San Jose and way stations (New Almaden Wednesdays only) 1 :30 P 
17;3u a Sunday Excursion for San Jose, Santa Cruz, Pacific Grove, 

and Principal Way Stations t8:35p 

9 :00 A San Jose, Tres Pinos , Santa Cruz, Pacific Grove, Paso Robles 

San Luis Obispo, Guadalupe, Surf and principal way stations 4 :10 t 

10 :40 a San Jose and way stations *8 :00 A 

11:30 a San Jose and way stations It. *8:35a 

•3:45 p San Mateo, Redwood, Menlo Park, Palo Alto. Santa Clara, 
San Jose, Gllroy, Hollister, Santa Cruz, Salinas, Mon- 
terey, and Pacific Grove *10:S6 A 

*3;31p San Jose and Way Stations *9:00A 

•4:15 P San Jose and Principal Way Stations 9:45 A 

*5:00p San Jose and Principal Way Stations 6:35 A 

6 :80 p San Jose and principal way stations 5 :30 p 

6:30pSanJose and way stations 7:30p 

til :45p San Jose and way stations 7:30p 

A for Morning. P for Atternoon. *Sundays exoepted. tSaturdays only. 

(Sundays only. 

oSaturdays andS-mdays. j Sundays and Mondays. 

The Pacific Transfer Company will call for and check baggage from 
hotels and residences. Enquire of Ticket Agents for Time Cards and 
other information. 

The Most Comfortable Way to Travel 



Santa R? 
' Route 



ACROSS THE CONTINENT. 

Through Pullman Palace and Tourist Sleep- 
ing Cars every day. Meals at Harvey's fam- 
ous dining rooms. Get full particulars at 
Ticket office, 628 Market street, San Fran- 
cisco, and 1118 Broadway, Oakland, Cal. 



S<N FRANCISCO TO S«N RAFAEL. TlBtmuR Fikht- Footof Market Strool. 

WEEK DAYS— 7:80, 0:00. 11:00 A U, I2:». S:S0 5:10. 8:30 p H. Thuradkjl— 
Extra trip at 11:90 p M. Saturdays— Extra trips at 1 :fto and 11 :30 p y. 
SUNDAYS— 8:00,»:JO, 11:00* u. 1:90. 9:30, 6:00. «:20 P M. 

SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO. 

WEEK DAYS— «:>0. 7:B0. »:'.l). 11:10 A y; 12:46. 9:40,6:10py. Saturdays— 

Extra trips at 1 :66 and 6:36 p M. 

SUNDAYS— 8:10, 9:40, 11:10 AH; 1:40, 840, 6:00,6:26 P y. 

Between San Francisco and Schuctzen Park, same soncdulo as above. 



Leave s. P. 


In Effect Juno 26, 1898 


ARRIVE in S. F. 


Weok Days. 


Sundays. 

8:00AM 
9:30 am 
5:00pm 


Destination. 


Sundays 

10:40 am 
6:10 pm 

7:35 p m 


Week Days 


7:30a y 
8:30py 
6:10 py 


Novato, 
Petaluma, 
Santa Rosa. 


8:40 A M 
10:26 AM 
6:22 PM 






Pulton, Windsor, 

Healdsburg, 

Geyserville, Cloverdale 






7:30am 


8:00 AM 


7:36pm 




8:80 PM 


6:22 P M 


7:30 am 
3:30 PM 


8:O0am 


Hopland, Uklah 


7:85 pm 


10:25 A M 
6:22PM 


7:80A M 
3:30PM 


8:00am 


Guernevllle. 


7:85pm 


10:25 A M 
6:22 p M 


7:30 AM 

6:10pm 


8:00 am 
5:00 pm 


Sonoma, 
Glen Ellen. 


10:40 am 
6:10pm 


8:40 A M 
8:22 P M 


7:30am 
8:30pm 


8:00am 
5:00 pm 


Sevastopol. 


10:40 am 
7:85 pm 


10:25 A M 
6:22 P M 



Stages connect at Santa Rosa for Mark West Springs; at Lytton for 
Lytton Springs; at Geyserville for Skaggs' Springs; at Cloverdale for the 
Geysers; at Hopland for Duncan Springs. Highland Springs, Kelsey- 
ville, Carlsbad Springs, Soda Bay, Lakeport, and Bartlett Springs; at 
Ukiah, for Vichy Springs, Saratoga Springs, Blue Lakes, Laurel Del 
Lake, Upper Lake, Porno, Potter Valley, John Day's, Riverside. Lier- 
ley's, Bucknell's Sanhedrin Heights, Hullville, Boonevllle, Orr's Springs, 
Mendocino City, Ft. Bragg, Westport, Usal. 

Saturday-to-Monday Round Trip Tickets at reduced rates. On Sundays, 
Round Trip Tickets to all points beyond San Rafael at half rates. 

TICKET OFFICE— 650 Market St., Chronicle Building. 
A. W. FOSTER, Pres. & Gen. Manager. R. X. RYAN, Gen. PasB . Agent. 



Pacific Coast Steamship Co. 




Steamers leave Broadway 
Wharf, San Francisco. 

For Alaskan ports. 10 a. h. August 4, 9, 14, 19, 34,39; 
September 3; transfer at Seattle. 

For Alaskan ports (from Spear St. wharf ) 10 a. m., 
August 3, 23; transfer at Portland, Or. 

For B. C. and Puget Sound Ports, 10 a. m., Aug. 4, 
9, 14, 19,34,39; Sept. 3, and every fifth day thereafter. 

For Eureka (Humboldt Bay) i0 a. m., August 6. 12, 18, 
24, 3d; Septembers and every sixth day thereafter. 
For Newport (Los Angeles) and way ports, 9 a. m. Aug. 
1, 5,9 13. '7, 21, 25, 29; September 2, and every fourth day thereafter. 
For San Diego, stopping only at Port Harford, Santa Barbara. Port Los 
Angeles, Redondo, (Los Angeles) 11 A. m., Aug 3, 7, 11, 15. 19. 23,27, 31; 
September 4, and every fourth day thereafter. 
For Mexican ports, 10 a. m., I8lh of every month. 
For further information obtain folder. 

The company reserves the right to change, without previous notice, 
steamers, sailing dates, and hours of sailing. 

TICKET OFFICE— No. 4 New Montgomery street. (Palace Hotel.) 

G00DALL. PERKINS & CO., Gen. Agts., 10 Market St., San Francisco 

Occidental and Oriental Steamship Co. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Steamers leave wharf, FIRST and BRANN AN STREETS, at 1 ph., for 

YOKOHAMA AND HONGKONG, 

calling at Kobe (Hio£o), Nagasaki and Shanghai, and connecting at 
Hongkong with steamers for India, eto. No cargo received on board on 
dayof sailing. 

Doric (via Honolulu) Saturday, August 13, 1898 

Belg i o (via Honolulu) Saturday, September 3, 1898 

COPTIC (via Honolulu) Thursday. Sept. 22, 1898 

Gaelic (via Hono.ulu) Tuesday, October 11, 1898 

Round Trip Tickets at Reduced rates. 

•for freight or passage apply at Company's Office, No. 421 Market street, 

corner First. D. D. STUBBS. General Manager. 

If II 11 IF SS "Mariposa." Wednesdav, Aug. 10th, at 2 pm. 
'PMlllW Line to Coolgardle, Australia, and Capetown 
l^ m South Afrioa. 

(^Ip^llKllin^ J ' D ' SPRECKELS & BROS • co - 

ifihlRflPfcr*- Agents, 114 Montgomery St. Freight office, 827 
^HipilH^ Market St.. San Francisco 




COAL I J. C WILSON & CO. 



900 Battery Street. 

RING UP MAIN 1864. 



FAMILY TRADE 



A SPECIALTY 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 6, 1898. 



MOCH, DER KAISER! 



(FROM THE "MONTREAL SUN.'') 

|The death of the Iron Chancellor brings Into high light Emperor Wil- 
liam, whoee personal peculiarities have otten been the subject of well- 
deserved jest in this country and anxiety in his own. The following lines 
bit off admirably the puissant attribute with which the Kaiser invests 
himself and his mighty mission in the universe.] 

~J\ER Kaiser auf der Vaterland 
*-\ Und Gott on High all dings command, 
Ve two! Ach! don'd you understand? 
Meinself — und Gott. 

While some men sing der power divine, 
Mein soldiers der Wacht am Rhein, 
Und trink her healt, in Rheinisn wein, 
Auf me — und Gott. 

Dere's France dot svaggers all aroundt, 
She's ausgespielt — she's no aggoundt 
To much, ve dinks — she don't amount — 
Meinself — und Gott. 

She vill not dare to fight again; 
But, if she should I'll sho.v her blain 
Dot Elsaas und (in French) Lorraine 
Are mein— by Gott. 

Dere's gran'ma dinks she's kein small beir 
Mit Boors and dings she interfere- - 
She'll learn none owns this hemisphere 
But me— und Gott. 

She dinks, good frau, some ships she's got, 
Und soldiers mit der scarlet coat— 
Ach! Ve could knock them— pouf— like dot! 
Meinself— und Gott. 

In dimes auf peace brebared for wars, 
I bear the helm and spear of Mars, 
Und care nicht for ten dousand Czars— 
Meinself— und Gott. 

In short, I humor ev